Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released October 25, 2019 | Harry Connick Jr

Hi-Res
Following his foray into the uber-contemporary pop production of 2015's That Would Be Me, Harry Connick, Jr. returns to his swinging big-band sound with 2019's True Love: A Celebration of Cole Porter. The singer's first album since signing with the storied Verve label, True Love is also his first extended exploration of a single composer's work. A burnished set of Porter standards, the album brings to mind Connick's late-'80s and early-'90s work, especially We Are in Love, Blue Light, Red Light, and his beloved soundtrack to When Harry Met Sally. Helping to capture this energy is Connick's big band, featuring seasoned players like bassist Neal Caine, New Orleans trumpeter Mark Braud, saxophonist Bob Sheppard, and others. On some tracks, he even brings in a full orchestra, creating a sound that evokes classic albums by his heroes Nat King Cole and Frank Sinatra. The best moments on the album are the punchy, midtempo swingers like "Anything Goes," "Just One of Those Things," and the buoyant "I Love Paris," all of which showcase Connick's vocal charisma and his band's dynamic instrumental skills. The latter song also includes a bluesy solo by New Orleans trombonist Lucien Barbarin, who also guests on a roiling and sultry rendition of "Why Can't You Behave." It's also nice to hear Connick take his turn at the piano, soloing several times on the album and offering an extended Cuba-meets-New Orleans bar-style intro to "Begin the Beguine." This is a lush, languorously paced album, but it never drags; even the slower songs benefit from bluesy instrumental solos and Connick's richly attenuated arrangements. True to Porter's urbane image, Connick offers an album as romantic as it is sophisticated. ~ Matt Collar
HI-RES$17.49
CD$14.99

Jazz - Released June 7, 2013 | Columbia

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released June 1, 1990 | Columbia

At one point in 1990, two Harry Connick, Jr. albums were released almost simultaneously, an instrumental outing with his trio (Lofty's Roach Souffle) and this vocal-oriented album. Oddly enough We Are in Love is the more successful of the two. Connick's vocals, while limited, are personable, guitarist Russell Malone gets in some short solos and Branford Marsalis makes two strong guest appearances (one apiece on tenor and soprano). Most selections utilize an orchestra and, although Connick is heard on piano, the emphasis is on his voice. He contributed most of the tunes but the high points are the two standards "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" and "It's Alright with Me." ~ Scott Yanow
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released September 24, 1991 | Columbia

CD$12.99
She

Jazz - Released June 30, 1994 | Columbia

Known for a style reminiscent of a young Frank Sinatra, Harry Connick, Jr. takes a drastic turn on SHE, choosing the funkier side of his New Orleans roots. Enlisting the likes of George Porter Jr. and Ziggy Modeliste (the Meters' rhythm section), Connick easily shifts into a more '70s-oriented vibe. The Earth, Wind, & Fire sounding background vocals which wash over "Between Us" are preceded by Connick's grittier phrasing in the title track where he plays an organ like a man possessed. The experimentation on SHE is best exemplified on "Follow The Music" and its companion "Follow The Music Further" featuring a stab at beat-esque minimalism courtesy of Ramsey McLean's smoky recitation over a bare rhythm track. Harry Connick, Jr. pays the ultimate tribute to his hometown, coming out of the slinky instrumental "Joe Slam And The Spaceship" into "To Love The Language" which lovingly embraces the vernacular of the Crescent City.
CD$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released July 25, 1989 | Columbia

Harry Connick, Jr.'s vocals perfectly fit the moods throughout the 1989 Billy Crystal film When Harry Met Sally. This soundtrack album (which stands apart from the movie) was a big hit and a major step forward for the young pianist-vocalist, although it appears to have been the high point of his career. Connick warmly sings such numbers as "It Had to Be You," "Our Love Is Here to Stay," "But Not for Me," and "Let's Call the Whole Thing Off," while usually accompanied by bassist Benjamin Wolfe, drummer Jeff "Tain" Watts, and a big band. Frank Wess' warm tenor makes a brief appearance on "Our Love Is Here to Stay." In addition, there are a few melodic instrumentals, including some solo Connick piano on "Winter Wonderland" and "Autumn in New York." Highly recommended. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$14.99

Pop - Released September 21, 2009 | Columbia

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released February 2, 2004 | Columbia

Featuring ballads from the '50s and '60s, Only You finds vocalist/pianist Harry Connick, Jr. further developing his contemporary crooner aesthetic. Having begun his career covering popular songs from the '20s through the '40s, it's surprising that Connick never before explored tunes from the baby boomer era. In some ways, it's almost as if he skipped the period altogether, moving from the '40s to the '70s between 1992's 25, his last jazz standards album, and 1994's She, his move to funk and pop. It was a jarring creative leap that many fans found too far to make with him. It's pleasing then, that Connick has found ways to incorporate his love of the Great American Songbook and straight-ahead jazz in a style that harks back to jazz's golden era without being retro. Only You showcases this, soaring on Connick's sophisticated and classy arrangements of such popular tunes as "I Only Have Eyes for You," "Save the Last Dance for Me," and "More." From his cinematic bossa nova take of "My Blue Heaven," replete with pizzicato string backgrounds, to his inspirational gospel-inflected version of "For Once in My Life," Connick's vision for these classic songs is singular and fresh. ~ Matt Collar
CD$14.99

Pop/Rock - Released February 25, 2011 | Columbia

Part of WNET's Great Performances series on PBS, In Concert on Broadway features crooner/pianist Harry Connick, Jr. performing with big band and orchestra over two nights at the Neil Simon Theatre in New York City in July of 2010. Backing Connick here is a top-notch group of musicians featuring several well-known New Orleans performers, including trombonist Lucien Barbarin and trumpeter Mark Braud, who are featured. Although the album opens with his '90s hit "We Are in Love," Connick largely sticks to tracks off his 2009 album Your Songs. To this end, listeners get his take on the Latin classic "Bésame Mucho" and the American popular song standard "All the Way," as well as the mid-album Frank Loesser medley "My Time of Day"/"I've Never Been in Love Before." Elsewhere, Connick delves into his own high-quality original material with "The Other Hours" from 2003's Other Hours: Connick on Piano, Vol. 1 as well as the midtempo swinger "Nowhere with Love" and title track from 1999's Come by Me. A longtime champion for his hometown of New Orleans, Connick closes out the album with several joyous Crescent City-themed cuts, including his own "Take Her to the Mardi Gras" as well as the traditional second-line song "Bourbon Street Parade." Joyous, urbane, and always charming, Connick is in perfect vocal form here and, of course, shows off his impeccable piano jazz chops throughout the album. In every way, In Concert on Broadway is a welcome showcase for Connick's traditional-meets-contemporary pop chops. ~ Matt Collar
CD$12.99

Pop/Rock - Released May 11, 1999 | Columbia

By 1999, Harry Connick, Jr. found himself in a curious place. Undoubtedly, he was one of the artists that kick-started the whole neo-swing movement that peaked in the late '90s. However, he was always too serious and traditional -- too much of a musician, really -- to fit in with the likes of the Cherry Poppin' Daddies. Furthermore, he was too much of a veteran. When he was reviving swing, it was in the late '80s, when nobody else believed it could be hip again. Surely, he must have been a little irked when he saw legions of groups that were nowhere near as musically fluent or as knowledgeable as he was cultivate huge followings. So, there was only one solution -- return to big-band swing, after years of attempting some sort of amorphous New Orleans funk and R&B. Of course, he'd probably be offended if anyone suggested that Come by Me was actually a response to neo-swing, but it's easy to interpret it that way, especially since he shows what the younger swing groups are missing. Connick knows what makes big bands work. He makes the classics sound fresh and newer songs sound like classics. More importantly, age suits him well; he no longer sounds like a young kid singing his father's music, he sounds natural and inspired. True, he occasionally sounds a bit too close to Sinatra for some tastes, but at least he can really sing, along with knowing how to make a big band swing, which, ironically, not all neo-swing acts can do. That alone makes Come by Me a welcome comeback. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$14.99

Pop - Released October 23, 2015 | Columbia

That Would Be Me is something of an ironic title for this 2015 album, considering how it's a relatively radical overhaul of Harry Connick, Jr.'s sound. Squalls of New Orleans horns can be felt (if not always heard); there are hints of R&B and gospel; his piano is seductive enough to flirt with the louche and, as always, Connick has a way with a ballad, easing into the slower tempos without ever seeming lazy. In this respect, That Would Be Me is recognizably a Harry Connick, Jr. record. Thing is, there's the production -- an unapologetically brash pop blast, orchestrated separately by Butch Walker and Eg White. Both producers have recorded with P!nk, and Walker, like Connick, has a background in music reality TV -- Walker got there before Connick, working on the legendary 2006 series Rock Star: Supernova -- but White's modern pop is a better touchstone for Connick's album than Walker's rock. Connick largely skirts the tastefulness of Adele and Will Young, however, allowing himself to indulge in both cheerfully robust rockers ("[I Like It When You] Smile") and cornball soft rock ("Songwriter"). Sometimes the slick textures and electric pianos evoke the golden age of Yacht Rock, but Connick is up to something clever, letting the rhythms hit with the force (if not the precise style) of hip-hop-infused R&B, and glossing the whole proceedings in a crisp, reflective sheen so it winds up reinforcing either his sly pop classicism or modern wit, depending on the listener's point of view. This savvy swing is the key to the success of That Would Be Me, because Connick winds up expanding his horizons without selling out his musical aesthetic. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released September 12, 1992 | Columbia

This 1992 CD is a throwback to Harry Connick's earlier sets for it mostly features the pianist-vocalist on a solo set of standards. Ellis Marsalis drops by to back Connick's vocal on "Stardust," Connick accompanies Johnny Adams' singing on "Lazybones," and "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe" is a trio outing with tenor saxophonist Ned Goold and bassist Ray Brown. Otherwise it is all Connick and he sounds in good form on such tunes as "Music, Maestro, Please," "On the Street Where You Live," "After You've Gone" and "Muskrat Ramble." It is a pity that Connick has not continued in this direction. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$12.99
20

Jazz - Released November 1, 1988 | Columbia

On a set of mostly unaccompanied piano solos and vocals, Harry Connick, Jr., shows a great deal of potential. His renditions of 11 standards are highlighted by collaborations with singer-organist Dr. John on "Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans" and especially a memorable vocal duet with Carmen McRae on "Please Don't Talk About Me When I'm Gone." In addition, bassist Bob Hurst helps out on "Do Nothin' Till You Hear from Me." Years later, this still remains one of Harry Connick, Jr.'s finest recordings. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released October 21, 1997 | Columbia

Harry Connick is heard in three roles on this CD. As a jazz pianist, he makes some cameo appearances and shows that his playing has evolved a bit from his earlier years. Connick has matured as a vocalist, and he sounds fine backed by a string orchestra and his quartet, never stretching himself. All ten selections (ballads dealing with love) are his originals, and he displays some talent as a composer/lyricist/arranger, although it is doubtful that any of these numbers will become standards in the future. A more interesting set overall than his preceding pop date, To See You is a step in the right direction for Harry Connick, Jr., and also features brief, warm tenor solos from Charles Goold. ~ Scott Yanow
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 30, 2007 | Columbia

After Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in the summer of 2005, musician Harry Connick, Jr. was one of the first people to lend not only his celebrity, but also his own two hands in aid to the survivors of the catastrophe. Connick brought a television crew with him as he traveled through his damaged hometown and shot footage to help draw attention to the situation. Soon after, he organized the benefit telethon A Concert for Hurricane Relief on NBC to raise money for the beleaguered residents of New Orleans. It was clear through all of this that Connick truly loved his hometown and perhaps even felt he owed the city a debt for all it had given to him. In that light, though he tastefully underplays his feelings about the tragedy, Connick's Oh, My Nola is clearly his response to Hurricane Katrina. But rather than making a one-note album filled with anger and sadness -- though he expresses those emotions here, too -- Oh, My Nola feels at once like a party-driven celebration of all that is New Orleans and a love letter to the city he almost lost. Featuring songs from, of, and about New Orleans, Oh, My Nola touches on almost every musical style that has come from the city and, in a similar sense, every style Connick has delved into over the years. For that reason it's both his most expansive and personal album to date, and finally finds the pianist/vocalist/arranger coalescing his eclectic tastes in jazz standards, stride piano, funk, Cajun, gospel, and contemporary pop under a unified vision that not surprisingly takes him back to the roots of New Orleans music. To these ends, he turns Allen Toussaint and Lee Dorsey's classic R&B cut "Working in the Coal Mine" into a swaggeringly funky big-band workout. Similarly inventive, he does Hughie Cannon's traditional "Won't You Come Home, Bill Bailey?" as a second-line-inspired big-band swing number reminiscent of his own When Harry Met Sally soundtrack. But while these numbers showcase Connick's obvious talent for arranging and crafting large ensemble numbers, other cuts such as the traditional "Careless Love" reveal his more laid-back, country-inflected barroom piano style that recalls his early solo albums 20 and 25. Mixing this approach, Connick once again returns to Toussaint with the spiritual and motivational "Yes We Can" in a loping and funky, large-ensemble style. Always a student of American popular song, it's no surprise that Connick's original compositions stand up next to the classic tracks here; however, it's also on these originals that he moves toward expressing his anger over what happened to the city. On the half-improvised, stark, and funky "All These People" Connick sings, "I was so damn scared I held hands and wandered with the crazy man, but he wasn't crazy and I wasn't scared/We were just brothers that stood there and stared at all those people waiting there." It's one of the few moments of outright protest on the album and deftly conveys Connick's first-hand account of post-hurricane New Orleans. However, listening to the whole of Oh, My Nola, it becomes clear that the true protest Connick is concerned with is a protest of the soul against events that conspire to erase all that we hold dear. This is best expressed in Connick's own title track. Set to a simple midtempo traditional New Orleans jazz beat, he sings, "How proud would Louie and Mahalia be, to know that their memory was safe with me?/Oh, my Nola, old and true and strong just like a tall magnolia tree/Sit me in the shade and I'm right where I belong/Oh, my New Orleans, wait for me." ~ Matt Collar
CD$10.99

Jazz - Released October 21, 1992 | Columbia

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released October 19, 2001 | Columbia

CD$18.49

Jazz - Released May 5, 2006 | Columbia

CD$12.99

Jazz - Released August 8, 2003 | Columbia

Ten years after his first holiday-themed album, When My Heart Finds Christmas, pianist/vocalist Harry Connick, Jr. found the spirit again with Harry for the Holidays. Still centered on Connick's vocals, this foray into "tinsel tunes" is more jazz oriented than his 1993 release and allows for his growth as a performer, arranger, and conductor. Like a Brooks Brothers' suit worn at Mardi Gras, Connick's writing for his big band and full orchestra mixes New Orleans rhythms with crisp, swinging arrangements that call to mind '60s Michel Legrand and Quincy Jones. Nothing Connick has done before can quite prepare you for the screaming trumpets and rollicking second-line-style swing of his leadoff take on "Frosty the Snowman." In fact, most of the classic standards here, including "Hark the Herald Angels Sing" and "Silver Bells," get highly unexpected treatments as on "Santa Clause Is Coming to Town," which is worked up into a funky, brass-band "go-go" dance number. Similarly tasty is "I'll Be Home for Christmas," which not only features some of the best crooning the Will and Grace star has ever done, but also a beautifully modest Count Basie-inspired piano solo. There is also an appealing balance to Harry for the Holidays between songs of Christmas nostalgia and heartfelt ruminations on what the season means in a deeper sense. Throw in four original compositions that touch on Scott Walker-esque orchestrated pop, Tin Pan Alley songcraft, and country -- yes, that is the George Jones dueting with Connick on "Nothin' New for the New Year" -- and not only do you have one of the best holiday albums in years, but easily the best album of Connick's career. ~ Matt Collar
CD$10.99

Jazz - Released November 17, 1987 | Columbia