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Alternative & Indie - Released April 26, 2019 | GBV Inc

Just when we were all getting used to the notion of Guided by Voices making only one album a year and recording songs that were in the neighborhood of three minutes long, Robert Pollard has to go and remind us he's still the guy who made Bee Thousand and Alien Lanes. Something of a throwback to GbV's early lo-fi era, 2019's Warp and Woof -- which arrived a bit less than three months after the super-sized Zeppelin Over China -- is a manic burst of bite-sized tuneage, whipping through 24 songs in less than 37 minutes. Originally planned as a stopgap EP, Warp and Woof grew into an LP as the band cut tunes during soundchecks, while waiting backstage, in their tour van, and at home, in addition to some studio sessions, and the results speak to the scattershot nature of its creation -- in a good way. Warp and Woof leaps from one idea to another in rapid succession, never letting any of them wear out their welcome, giving one melody just enough time to sink in before the next one takes its place. However, there are some substantive differences between Warp and Woof and GbV's lo-fi salad days. While the recording quality varies from track to track, this music is tighter and better focused than what the band delivered in their relative youth, and the upgrade in studio craft does make a difference. And even more important, this lineup of Guided by Voices continues to demonstrate it may be the best in the group's nearly 35-year history, and guitarists Doug Gillard and Bobby Bare, Jr., bassist Mark Shue, and drummer Kevin March hit a near-perfect sweet spot between raw, scrappy basement jamming and the power of a tight, emphatic rock band in full flight. Warp and Woof is a series of short sprints compared to the marathon of Zeppelin Over China, but it covers a lot of ground at a brisk pace and it's a whole lot of fun. Who would have guessed that GbV would be in the midst of a new golden era 15 years after they first broke up? ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 1, 2019 | GBV Inc

While no one would have guessed it at the time, the inglorious collapse of the "classic" lineup of Guided by Voices in 2014 has proved to be one of the best things that could have happened to the band. The collection of 1993 through 1996 stalwarts Robert Pollard first assembled for reunion shows in 2010 had nostalgia and lots of goodwill going for them, but the six albums they cut between 2012 and 2014 hardly ranked with GbV's best work, and their abrupt flame-out suggested the group's sell-by date had come at last. But since returning to action in 2016, Pollard and his latest set of collaborators -- Doug Gillard and Bobby Bare, Jr. on guitars, Mark Shue on bass, and Kevin March on drums -- have been on a remarkable hot streak, and this edition has delivered some of the strongest studio work of GbV's career. 2017's August by Cake and How Do You Spell Heaven and 2018's Space Gun were ambitious and accomplished in a way GbV hadn't achieved since the early 2000s, and 2019's Zeppelin Over China is every bit as memorable as its immediate predecessors. Once again, the big difference is two-fold: by slowing down his legendary productivity, Pollard is giving us one very good album a year instead of two or three so-so ones, and he's working with musicians who don't just accompany him, but add richness and texture to his songs. Like Space Gun, Zeppelin Over China finds GbV leaning more toward the prog rock side of Pollard's melodic influences (though there are still tunes to die for scattered throughout). Doug Gillard is a guitar player with the chops and good taste to make the most of the melodies, and he's also written string and horn arrangements for several tracks that put the right amount of whipped cream on the top of this sundae. Bare, Shue, and March do a superb job of holding down the rhythms, and producer Travis Harrison reminds us that hi-fi doesn't have to be a bad thing for Guided by Voices as long as he gives the players the space to do what they do best. Delivering 32 songs in 75 minutes, Zeppelin Over China is overstuffed in the grand GbV tradition, and it delivers like the loosest slot machine in Las Vegas, paying off over and over with great songs and vigorous, inspiring rock & roll. Guided by Voices have been enjoying an unexpected but very welcome late-career renaissance, and anyone who has ever had a taste for their singular take on rocking pop owes it to themselves to check out Zeppelin Over China. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2018 | GBV Inc

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Robert Pollard has long taken pride in being recklessly prolific, cranking out albums with his band Guided by Voices at a dizzying pace while also issuing a steady flow of solo releases and side projects. When GBV released August by Cake in April 2017, Pollard announced it was the 100th album he'd appeared on, and several fans contested his math, insisting he'd been on even more LPs than that. So when Pollard declared that Space Gun would be the only Guided by Voices album of 2018, it was hard not to wonder what he was up to. Why was the most prolific man in indie rock suddenly dialing down his workflow? Well, maybe he just wanted to concentrate on making one really good album for a change. Pollard certainly benefited from the strength and chops of the edition of GBV he assembled -- guitarists Doug Gillard and Bobby Bare, Jr., bassist Mark Shue, and drummer Kevin March -- on 2017's August by Cake and How Do You Spell Heaven, and Space Gun doubles down on the skill of his current collaborators. Pollard hasn't had a band this solid since GBV's initial breakup in 2004 (that lineup also featured Gillard and March), and they sound tight, muscular, and imaginative on Space Gun, not just playing Pollard's songs but giving them shape and gravity they might not have had otherwise. These guys sound like a band, not a handful of backing musicians, and with producer Travis Harrison at the controls, this real band has made what sounds like a real album. Space Gun is full-bodied and adventurous, with the subtle but intelligent use of the studio giving the album a sonic gravitas that many of GBV's albums, good as they are, happen to lack. And as both a songwriter and a vocalist, Pollard is in especially fine fettle, with his bent pop melodies and gloriously cryptic lyrics a perfect match for a band that can play this stuff with a power that belies its detail-oriented intuition. Guided by Voices haven't made an album that's this committed to craft since 2001's Isolation Drills, and if Space Gun doesn't quite match that underappreciated masterpiece, it comes close enough to confirm that Guided by Voices are quietly in the midst of a late-career renaissance. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 4, 1995 | Matador

It's surprising what a difference it makes when a musician knows someone will actually be hearing his work. After 1994's charmingly sloppy Bee Thousand gained Guided By Voices a nationwide cult following (instead of the local cult following they were accustomed to), 1995's Alien Lanes found Robert Pollard and his partners in hard pop cleaning up their act a bit. For the most part, Alien Lanes isn't radically different from Bee Thousand -- it was primarily recorded on a four-track cassette machine (and sounds like it), and Guided By Voices was still a garage band with more in the way of inspiration than chops. But the musicians have put a bit more care and focus into their performance on this set; the playing is tighter and sharper, and the band plays toward their strengths, pushing their occasional sloppiness into a harder, more rock-oriented direction. And if Pollard and Tobin Sprout were still obsessed with tiny fragments of pop song wonderment, they also rounded up a more consistent collection of them; there aren't quite as many obvious masterpieces as on Bee Thousand, but also fewer obvious mistakes, and the sequencing gives the album a more consistent flow than before. Pollard also made genuine inroads into more lyrically cognizant material (though don't fret, "Auditorium" and "Blimps Go 90" are as cryptic as ever), and "Watch Me Jumpstart," "Striped White Jets," and "Motor Away" are simply superb pop/rock songs. (Sprout also gets a few shining moments on "A Good Flying Bird" and "Straw Dogs.") Both Bee Thousand and Alien Lanes sound like they were made by a band of inspired amateurs with great ideas; the difference is that Alien Lanes suggests that Guided By Voices wanted to prove that they could turn pro some day. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2005 | Scat

The cult of indie rock thrives on the unexpected discovery, and in 1994 Guided by Voices were just the sort of musical phenomenon no one figured was still out there -- 30-something rock obsessives cranking out fractured guitar-driven pop tunes in a laundry room. Robert Pollard and his stable of beer buddies/backing musicians had been churning out stuff like Bee Thousand for years, but the album's surprise critical success marked the first time the group found a significant audience outside their hometown, and it made a clear case for Guided by Voices' virtues -- as well as their flaws. From the moment "Hardcore UFOs" kicks in, it's obvious that Pollard has an uncanny gift for a hook and a melody, and Bee Thousand's 20 cuts are dotted with miniature masterpieces like "Echos Myron," "Smothered in Hugs," and "Queen of Cans and Jars." However, there are also more than a few duds that threaten to cancel out the goodwill the great songs generate, and Pollard is an acquired taste as a lyricist -- his freakishly poetic verse has a real charm, but it's hard to figure out what he's on about. (GBV's other principal songwriter, Tobin Sprout, contributes less often, but manages a higher batting average.) The lo-tech rumble of the album's D.I.Y. production also wavers between being a help and a hindrance, depending on the songs, and as musicians Guided by Voices veer between sounding like inspired amateurs and, well, just amateurs. On Bee Thousand, Guided by Voices sound like a passionate and gloriously quirky garage band fronted by a thrillingly and maddeningly idiosyncratic songwriter; its many pearly moments make it a fascinating discovery for rock enthusiasts, but a few years would pass before this band was fully earning the new accolades showered upon it. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 3, 2001 | The Orchard

Guided by Voices fans who embraced them as the saviors of lo-fi pop after discovering such four-track-in-a-basement masterpieces as Bee Thousand and Alien Lanes had better learn to live with the fact those days are gone for good -- the high-gloss production of 1999's Do the Collapse made it clear that GBV topkick Robert Pollard wanted his band to compete in rock's big leagues, and Isolation Drills only confirms that notion, sounding even more polished and precise than its precursor. However, if you loved GBV for their songs rather than their sometimes-charming sloppiness, then you'll be glad to hear that Pollard and Company have never used professionalism to better advantage than they do here. While Ric Ocasek's production on Do the Collapse was sympathetic, he clearly favored the pop side of the band's personality at the expense of their muscle (most clearly evidenced by the pseudo-new wave keyboard patches). But with Rob Schnapf behind the controls, Isolation Drills sounds like the real rock album GBV have always wanted to make; Pollard's hooky-but-rollicking melodies pay audible tribute to his great love for mid-'70s rock throughout, while Doug Gillard and Nate Farley's guitars finally crunch as much as they chime, making the band's rock moves as credible as their pop gestures ("Glad Girls" and "Chasing Heather Crazy" even finding them managing both at the same time, to superb effect). And Guided by Voices has never made an album this consistently strong from start to finish; with the possible exception of "Frostman" (which appears to have been processed to sound like it was recorded on four track), every song here matters, with Pollard's vocals at the top of their form (it helps that most of his lyrics actually make sense for a change -- sounds like Bob's been having relationship problems again) and the band sounds tight, forceful, and emphatic throughout. God knows if the indie rock audience will ever forgive him for such obvious craft, but the side of Pollard's personality that thought touring with Cheap Trick was a great idea finally gets the album he's been waiting for with Isolation Drills. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 14, 1995 | Matador

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 26, 1996 | Matador

After firmly establishing themselves as America's most original and interesting band of part-time, over-30 garage rockers, Under the Bushes Under the Stars found Guided by Voices dipping their toes into something resembling professionalism. Leaving behind the homemade studio craft of their previous work, this album was recorded in a pair of actual recording studios, and the sessions boasted an outside producer (friend and temporary fellow Ohioan Kim Deal); while no one would mistake the results for the latest Bob Rock project, the set sounded more like a "real" record than anything GBV had attempted up to that time. The new edition of the band attempted to rise to the occasion, and though the performances lack the passion of Bee Thousand and Alien Lanes' finest moments, the stronger playing and cleaner production honors the pop sensibilities of Robert Pollard's songwriting. Pollard was also reaching for a better controlled style as a songwriter; Under the Bushes Under the Stars boats a mere 18 songs (as opposed to the 30 on Alien Lanes), and most sound like full fledged pop tunes, with fewer shards of musical fancy littering the way. While Pollard's tighter reign over the band and new sense of self-control made this album a more solid and consistent album than GBV had made in the past, it's also not as exciting as Alien Lanes; Pollard's songs lack a certain fire here (though "Man Called Aerodynamics," "Your Name Is Wild," and "The Official Ironmen Rally Song" sound just fine), and the band sounds more stifled than enthused by their new grasp of the material. There's plenty to enjoy here, but it also appeared to have caught Guided by Voices in a transitional stage; just how much they were changing would be revealed on their next two albums. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 3, 2003 | Matador

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 5, 1996 | Scat

1992's Propeller was an album that Guided by Voices originally released themselves; it was eventually reissued on the Scat label one year later. All of the ingredients that make the group totally original are present -- rough production, strong melodies courtesy of Robert Pollard, and an overall sound straight out of the British clubs back in the mid-'60s. The opening epic, "Over the Neptune/Mesh Gear Fox," is two different songs sewn together (similar to T. Rex's "Tenement Lady" off their classic Tanx album). It starts off as a rock & roller and later changes into space rock, while "Quality of Armor" starts off as a cross between the Beatles and Elvis Costello's "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace Love and Understanding?" But Guided by Voices have a style all their own, evidenced by the irresistible combination of chromatic guitar riffs and anthemic choruses contained in "Exit Flagger," and in the experimental song splices throughout "Back to Saturn X Radio Report." "Circus World" is pure guitar pop, as is the now-classic "Weedking." Propeller proved to be an important stepping stone for the group, helping to set the stage for such later triumphs as Bee Thousand and Alien Lanes. ~ Greg Prato
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Rock - Released August 3, 1999 | The Orchard

One school of thought regarding Guided By Voices considers the band in their element with a four-track, turning out impressionist albums of fragmented, mini-pop songs. The other claims that they're a great pop band that has never made a great pop album because of their adherence to the four-track. Maybe frontman Robert Pollard is among the latter camp, since Do the Collapse is their first effort recorded in a full-fledged studio with a real producer, namely Ric Ocasek. Of course, the jump to professionalism could have happened simply because there was nowhere left to go; their amateurish, homemade guitar pop had become entirely too predictable, and hiring Cobra Verde as a backing band on Mag Earwhig! didn't really change things -- it was time for a shot at the big time. As a matter of fact, Do the Collapse was even designed as their major-label debut, but the label passed on their option after hearing the finished result, so GBV headed over for TVT. It's hard to blame the major label, actually, because Do the Collapse simply doesn't work. It's not that Ocasek's production is inappropriate, or that the expanded song lengths feel wrong, it's that Pollard is stuck in a rut. His songs follow familiar patterns, and now that there have been so many of them, it's hard not to feel like they're all tossed off to a certain extent. No hooks gain hold, the imagery feels silly, and there's no excitement or energy to the band's performances, resulting in exactly what any fan would fear from a GBV major-label release -- a puffed-up, overblown version of Alien Lanes. It's clear that's not what Pollard or Ocasek wanted, but the band's strengths have deteriorated so much, that's the only thing they were capable of cutting. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 24, 2004 | Matador

Ever since they first burst into the consciousness of indie rock fans across our great nation in 1994 with Bee Thousand, Guided by Voices seemed like one of those bands that was always going to be there for us, letting loose with a steady stream of albums, singles, EPs, live shows, and side projects that even devoted fans had trouble keeping up with. But in April of 2004, GBV commandant Robert Pollard announced that the band would be calling it quits at the end of that year, and that Half Smiles of the Decomposed would be their last album. Given its status as GBV's sort-of-official recorded farewell, Half Smiles of the Decomposed carries significantly more psychic weight than previous albums from the group, so it's a bit surprising that the results hardly equal a "typical" Guided by Voices CD. Comprised of a mere 14 songs in 42 minutes, half of which are over three minutes in length, Half Smiles of the Decomposed is a final departure from GBV's tradition of compact pop masterpieces, and while the production (by occasional keyboard player Todd Tobias) doesn't approach the slickness of Do the Collapse or Isolation Drills, this may be the polished and attentive "indie" album Pollard and GBV have ever made. And the songs appear to be reaching for an epic quality that goes beyond their length; Pollard's way with a melody is very much in evidence, but rather than going for simple blissful hookiness, this set approximates a homegrown version of the big-screen sweep of, say, The Who on Who's Next or Mott the Hoople on Mott. But even though Half Smiles of the Decomposed sounds great, the band plays with impressive skill, and it represents one of Pollard's most successful attempts to balance his lo-fi musical impulses against the demands of proper record production, it lacks the ineffable fire and energy that has always set their best work apart. In short, Half Smiles takes Guided by Voices to the edge of their musical possibilities, but instead of leading them to a final glorious victory, it just seems to stop at the end of the road. But then again, maybe this is really just where Robert Pollard picks up a ride to his next destination. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 18, 2002 | Matador

After leaving the comfy indie confines of Matador Records for the corporate sponsorship of bigger indie TVT Records, Robert Pollard and his partners in Guided by Voices abandoned the sloppy production that had long been their hallmark and starting playing on the same field as the big boys, which offended purists but also resulted in one of the band's best albums, 2001's Isolation Drills, which boasted a clean but potent production by Rob Schnapf. In 2002, Guided by Voices and TVT parted ways, and GBV's return to Matador, Universal Truths and Cycles, sounds like a case of two steps forward, one step back. Produced by the band with Todd Tobias in their humble home state of Ohio, Universal Truths and Cycles lacks the high sheen of Do the Collapse and Isolation Drills, but it also reveals a much sharper focus and precise musical attack than anything this band released prior to Mag Earwhig!, and if the production has a rougher surface, Pollard's ambition has certainly grown, with a tighter sound, more details, and even a well-placed string section on a few cuts. However, Universal Truths and Cycles shows the band has lost touch with the most important thing outside producers brought to their TVT albums -- someone to help pick, choose, and sequence Robert Pollard's over-abundance of songs. While Pollard has, as usual, come up with a few great tunes here (most notably "Cheyenne," "Everywhere With Helicopter," and "Eureka Signs"), this album lacks the thematic coherence and unified impact of Isolation Drills. Universal Truths and Cycles proves that Robert Pollard and Guided by Voices have come a long, long way since Bee Thousand and Alien Lanes, but it also suggests the old high school football star needs a good coach to play at the top of his game. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 1, 2019 | GBV Inc

Thirty-four years after their first lineup came together, Guided by Voices are once again a band making albums to look forward to -- guitar-heavy exercises in proggy-pop goodness that are smart and satisfying, ranking with the best recorded work of their career. And they're not repeating themselves, either. In February 2019, they issued the epic-scale Zeppelin Over China, a stylistic throwback to the great two-LP sets of the '70s, and the following April, they gave us Warp and Woof, a reminder of their era of compact genius, with 24 songs crammed into 37 minutes. Six months later, in October 2019, GbV handed over their third long-player of the year, Sweating the Plague, which could be seen as a compromise between those two sets. Like Zeppelin Over China, Sweating the Plague sounds big and bold, with Robert Pollard and his crew (Doug Gillard and Bobby Bare Jr. on guitars, Mark Shue on bass, and Kevin March on drums) quenching their thirst for hard rock bluster and prog rock melodic blandishments. But they're also keeping things relatively compact here, and though 12 songs in 38 minutes is fairly hefty by GbV standards, Sweating the Plague is like a good, solid meal that leaves you satisfied but not bloated, unlike the Thanksgiving-dinner quality of Zeppelin Over China. Sweating the Plague plays like a stately, unified work rather than a set of pop nuggets, though "My Wrestling Days Are Over" sounds like it could have been an outtake from Bee Thousand and "The Very Second" boasts a guitar figure that may have been borrowed from their fellow Ohioans Pere Ubu. Sweating the Plague is best taken as a whole rather than in smaller portions; it works as a clever but swaggering dose of rock & roll, and it plays to this band's strengths while showing how much they've expanded their sonic palette in over three decades...or in a single year, for that matter. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 11, 2017 | GBV Inc

It's sometimes difficult to fathom the thought processes of Robert Pollard, but more often than not, it turns out the guy knows what he's doing. More than a few fans and observers were puzzled when Pollard debuted a new edition of Guided by Voices in February 2016, less than 18 months after the ignoble breakup of the "classic lineup" that had been touring and recording since 2010. But a spin of 2017's How Do You Spell Heaven, the second album from the reconstituted band, shows that in terms of chops and imagination, Pollard certainly traded up. This version of GbV can do more than just play Pollard's songs -- they bring a tough but intelligent rock & roll swagger to the music, and seem as comfortable with his glam and prog rock influences as his pop hooks. Doug Gillard's lead guitar work shines on these tracks, especially the stomping instrumental workout "Pearly Gates Smoke Machine" (the tune was written by Gillard as well, with Pollard penning the rest of the set), and Bobby Bare, Jr. lends him impressive support. The rhythm section of Mark Shue on bass and Kevin March on drums is excellent, bringing a muscular snap to the performances as well as an enviable sense of color and shading. And with a band this good behind him, Pollard has stepped up as a vocalist, singing with a vigor and commitment that he hasn't achieved in recent years. As a songwriter, How Do You Spell Heaven finds Pollard in an expansive mood, with more (relatively) grand-scale rock numbers on board than pocket-sized pop tunes. But if Pollard has this good a band at his disposal, why wouldn't he want to make use of their talents? How Do You Spell Heaven is one of the best and smartest rock albums Guided by Voices have given us since Isolation Drills, and this music confirms Pollard is no dummy when it comes to putting together a band. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 19, 2003 | Matador

For those who love the idea of Guided By Voices a bit more than the reality, it's sometimes hard not to be frustrated with Robert Pollard, a scattershot genius who is equally well-defined by both halves of that description. GBV leader Pollard is a startlingly gifted and prolific songwriter and musician, but he also displays either an inability or a disinterest in separating his wheat from his chaff, as anyone who has tried to plow through his relentless barrage of side projects has doubtless noticed. Which is why Earthquake Glue is such a pleasant surprise -- it may well be the most consistent and satisfying Guided By Voices album to date, and if its potent rock crunch is bettered by 2001's superb Isolation Drills, this comes close enough to make any fan pummel his air guitar with glee. While the sharper focus and tight set list of Earthquake Glue is impressive, just as important is how good Guided By Voices sounds as a band these days; while usually regarded as little more than Pollard's backing group, this edition of GBV has become tight, emphatic, and joyously powerful after several years on the road and in the studio, with the guitars of Doug Gillard and Nate Farley and the rhythm section of Tim Tobias and Kevin March giving the tunes all the smarts and twice the muscle their creator could have hoped for. And while Earthquake Glue lacks the clunky lo-fi ambience of Bee Thousand or Alien Lanes, these songs suggest Pollard and his collaborators have been able to take the spontaneity and adventure of those tracks and graft them into a better structured and more satisfying framework. If Earthquake Glue isn't a masterpiece, it's as close as this band can be expected to get, and is the rare Guided By Voices effort that's imaginative enough for longtime loyalists and tight enough for dabblers at the same time. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 5, 1997 | Scat

The home-crafted appeal of Guided by Voices finally reached the general public when Vampire on Titus was released in 1993. The band was on a roll at the time, pumping out creative gems like a band possessed. With one of their very best lineups, they explore the many aspects of their limited production skills without any pretension. Bandleader Robert Pollard found his voice around this time, going from a tuneful yelp to a dark croon effortlessly. And the marvelous Tobin Sprout was still with the band at the time, contributing several memorable songs that mixed up things nicely. Songs float in and out with a tight efficiency that is not typical of many likeminded artists. But without one extra second wasted on a melody, the album's strengths are only made more evident. Pollard's voice had never sounded as dark and anxious as it does on "#2 in the Model Home Series," yet on most tracks he shows an endless optimism that brings to mind Warehouse-era Bob Mould. The beautiful "Marchers in Orange" is where his voice gets its best showcase, wailing away despite the weak production. The band really does display a tremendous amount of power and creativity on this effort, and fans of indie rock should try and find this as soon as possible. Like the Replacements' Hootenanny or Pavement's Slanted & Enchanted, this kicked off a several-album streak of brilliance that went unnoticed by the mainstream but collected quite a following in the underground. ~ Bradley Torreano
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2005 | Scat

Likely their darkest album, Same Place the Fly Got Smashed is another solid effort that takes the form of a tragic rock opera about a doomed, midwestern alcoholic. While the joylessness of this concept wears a bit thin over the course of the 13 tracks, the songwriting is compelling enough to make it fly. Punk rave-ups ("The Hard Way" and "Local Mix-Up/Murder Charge") and accoustic strummers ("When She Turns 50" and "How Loft I Am?") are equally capable in the evocation of the emotions of guilt, hopelessness, and forgotten innocence that pervade the album. ~ Brian Christopher Egan
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 29, 2003 | Matador

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 6, 1996 | Matador