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Electronic - Released October 2, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

Groove Armada's ninth studio full-length, Edge of the Horizon, trades big beats for mood, transporting listeners to a cool, funky dimension where past crossover hits like "Superstylin'" and "History" make way for nostalgic, synth-based dreamscapes. Along with a team of inspired guests, the English duo creates a world that exists somewhere between Prince and Empire of the Sun. The latter group's Nick Littlemore makes multiple appearances here, returning to the mix a decade after his last collaborations with the pair wound up on 2010's Black Light/White Light. Littlemore's contributions -- the LCD Soundsystem-in-space highlight "Get Out on the Dancefloor" and the persistent pianos-and-synths "Tripwire" -- are some of the more upbeat numbers on Edge, joining other standouts such as the sleek '80s funk of "Don't Give Up" and the slinky sheen of "Talk Talk," which features James Alexander Bright's intergalactic electronic touch. Fans of Daft Punk's Random Access Memories gem "Fragments of Time" will be delighted to see Todd Edwards, who delivers "Lover 4 Now," which sounds like Wham!'s "Everything She Wants" went through a '70s time warp. Altogether, Edge of the Horizon is a pleasing trip through the psychedelic that bridges the vibes of a past era with sharp production, providing a calming comedown to balance the rest of Groove Armada's catalog. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Dance - Released February 22, 2000 | Jive

Groove Armada's second album finds the pair expanding on the sonic range of 1998's Northern Star, spreading out to Franco-electronic pop ("Dusk, You and Me"), big-beat techno ("If Everybody Looked the Same"), and laid-back funk grooves (the masterpiece titled "At the River"). Though it often seems they're throwing change-ups more to show listeners what they can do, Vertigo achieves the effortless grace of a varied repertoire. © John Bush /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released July 11, 2001 | Jive Electro

Far more than just a sampladelic trip-hop group by their third full album jaunt, Groove Armada began solidifying its reputation as one of the most copacetic production acts in electronica, equally comfortable building grooves behind folkie Richie Havens, disco maverick Nile Rodgers, and underground rapper Jeru the Damaja (yes, all three make appearances). The pair kick it off in grand style, recruiting Jeru (one of the most underrated rappers in the hip-hop world) for "Suntoucher," a breathtaking production that seeks the middle ground between a classy spy soundtrack and a classic rap track (straight out of DJ Premier's playbook). The trailer single, "Superstylin'," is another great track, a smooth, swift fusion of acid house and dub with the chatting of frequent collaborator Mike Daniels. Groove Armada isn't just branching out from "juvenile" sampladelia to more "mature" band productions, the duo's getting better at making music. Unfortunately, problems arise when the pair mature so far they soon reach the bland, ultra-smooth side of adult contemporary. The two features for Richie Havens ("Little By Little," "My Friend") are prime examples; the bright acoustic guitar and Havens' wizened growl are the only "edgy" elements in the entire productions. "Lazy Moon" and "Fogma," a pair of solid instrumentals, bring it back slightly, though Groove Armada would be served best by sinking back into the underground and not adjusting its sensibilities to its collaborators, no matter how respected they are. © John Bush /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released June 23, 2003 | Jive

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Trip Hop - Released September 21, 2017 | Columbia

Between the release of 2004's The Best Of and 2007's Greatest Hits, Groove Armada released a grand total of one studio album, so it seems like a very peculiar time for the duo's second compilation. Greatest Hits, which even looks a whole lot like The Best Of, merely replaces five of its predecessor's inclusions with cuts taken from 2007's Soundboy Rock. So, on this disc, you get "Song 4 Mutya," "Get Down," "Love Sweet Sound," "Lightsonic," and "Girls Say" instead of "Take Me Home," "Madder," "Chicago," "Think Twice," and "Inside My Mind." Between the two releases, there are nine overlapping tracks. They are both adequate overviews. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released June 11, 2012 | Late Night Tales

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Trip Hop - Released May 4, 2007 | Columbia

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Electronic - Released June 3, 2013 | Cooking Vinyl

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Trip Hop - Released November 9, 2007 | Columbia

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Electronic - Released November 3, 2014 | Late Night Tales

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Electronic - Released December 4, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Electronic - Released March 10, 2008 | Late Night Tales

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Electronic - Released March 10, 2008 | Late Night Tales

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Trip Hop - Released November 7, 2007 | Columbia

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Dance - Released February 11, 2014 | Tummy Touch Records

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Electronic - Released March 10, 2008 | Late Night Tales

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Electronic - Released April 30, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Electronic - Released March 10, 2008 | Late Night Tales

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Electronic - Released September 9, 2014 | Om