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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | Lava Music - Republic Records

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Rock - Released October 19, 2018 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | Lava Music - Republic Records

Do you like Led Zeppelin? Mitten State retro-rockers Greta Van Fleet sure do, and their debut long-player -- it's actually a pair of combined EPs -- delivers enough Plant-induced "Oh mamas," genuine Page-turners, and cavernous Bonham-esque beats to reforge the hammers of the gods ten times over. Comparisons to the band's 1980s doppelgängers Kingdom Come are inevitable, but unlike those Zep clones, who arrived at a time when hard rock and hair metal were still fairly relevant, Greta Van Fleet are outliers, a trad rock band in an era that's more concerned with EDM drops than hot licks. Still, their unbridled enthusiasm for all things classic rock is kind of endearing -- their oldest members were barely of legal drinking age at the time of the recording -- and that fresh-faced approach to such well-worn tropes helps elevate the material. It's awfully easy to spot the Zep cut that served as the inspiration for each song -- "Safari Song" ("In My Time of Dying"), "Flower Power" ("Hey, Hey, What Can I Do"), "Highway Tune" ("The Rover"), etc. -- but there really isn't an iota of cynicism to be found. The future will not be too kind if subsequent efforts continue to climb the stairway to heaven, but there are worse ways to get your Led out. Ramble on, gents. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released December 4, 2020 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released October 9, 2020 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released October 19, 2018 | Republic Records

Greta Van Fleet hail from Frankenmuth, Michigan, home of Bronner's CHRISTmas Wonderland, the store that keeps the holiday spirit alive nearly every day of the year. Living with the specter of Santa is bound to keep a young man residing in a fantasy land, and so it is with Greta Van Fleet: They inhabit a world they never experienced, namely the '70s. Every member of Greta Van Fleet -- which consists of a heap of brothers called Kiszka and a drummer named Danny Wagner, all born too late to witness either Kingdom Come or Jimmy Page & Robert Plant's Unledded reunion -- act as if the earth stopped turning in 1974, the year when Led Zeppelin still traded in myths learned from J.R.R. Tolkien and strode the earth like golden gods. Try as they may -- and, lordy, do they try -- Greta Van Fleet never seem immortal on Anthem of the Peaceful Army, the 2018 album billed as their debut (From the Fires, a record that is only 12 minutes shorter than Anthem, is apparently a double-EP). Blame it on GVF's desperate desire to hit their marks precisely. The group is so intent on recapturing the majestic lumber of Zeppelin at their peak, they dare not miss a step, letting the riffs pile up so they suggest epics. Sometimes, guitarist Jake Kiszka, bassist Sam Kiszka, and drummer Danny Wagner do work up a head of drama -- no swing, of course, because it's harder to replicate John Bonham's beat than approximate Jimmy Page's guitar army -- but they're undone by Josh Kiszka, a singer who is intent on singing with velocity that he can't muster. Josh may be the weak link, but he merely reveals how the whole band seem to have learned their moves from watching late-night concerts on Palladium while buying pre-worn vintage-styled T's at Urban Outfitters. For the band and audience alike, Greta Van Fleet is nothing more than cosplay of the highest order. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 10, 2021 | Republic Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 6, 2019 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released March 19, 2021 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released February 10, 2021 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released October 9, 2020 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released December 4, 2020 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released March 19, 2021 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released April 16, 2021 | Republic Records

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Rock - Released April 16, 2021 | Lava - Republic Records

The Battle at Garden's Gate is the kind of album title that accurately reflects the contents within. Greta Van Fleet isn't much concerned with the modern world, preferring to live in a fantasy of their own creation, one cobbled together with ideas learned from old albums from Led Zeppelin, Rush, and Styx. All these elements were in place on their 2018 debut Anthem of the Peaceful Army, but they're amplified on The Battle at Garden's Gate, an album that makes everything that worked the first time bigger and louder, or just more. The group's unexpected success meant they had the power to enlist an A-list producer, so they brought Greg Kurstin -- a Grammy winner for his work with Adele and Beck who also helmed records by Paul McCartney and Foo Fighters -- into the studio to help shape their fanciful notions and heavy riffs. Kurstin manages to conjure the expansive vistas that were so common in 1974, letting the band puff up their pomp and ramble on. As texture is Greta Van Fleet's main gift, this is for the best: the extra length gives the impression that the group is in control of their fantasy. This spell works best when guitarist Jake Kiszka, bassist Sam Kiszka, and drummer Danny Wagner labor to conjure the ghost of Houses of the Holy, paying rapt attention to the slight shifts in light and shade. The spell is punctured whenever Josh Kiszka stumbles in to caterwaul his tales of barbarians and nations. More Geddy Lee than Robert Plant, Josh Kiszka commands attention then alienates; his wail is the weak link in a group who is getting better at their period-accurate cosplay. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo