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Chamber Music - Released November 4, 2014 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released May 4, 2004 | Naxos

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Among his most imaginative works, Schubert's fragmentary piano sonatas offer insights into his struggles with form and his experiments with tonality, preoccupations that led to great innovations in his final masterpieces. Composed between 1817 and 1823, the 12 unfinished sonatas reveal the most striking ideas and expressions, though many proved too difficult to develop satisfactorily; or, in other cases, the sonatas are incomplete because pages or whole movements are missing. The Sonata No. 5 in A flat major, D. 557, is the most complete and is included here because its unusual ending in E flat suggests an unwritten fourth movement. Written in 1817, the Sonata No. 7a in D flat major, D. 567, is a virtuoso piece Schubert wished to publish. However, the lost last page puts this substantial work among the fragments. The Sonata No. 11 in C major, D. 613/612, and the Sonata No. 12 in F minor, D. 625/505, are true fragments, with significant lacunae and without middle movements. Aside from the insertions of D. 612 and D. 505, Gottlieb Wallisch plays the sonatas as they appear in the manuscripts, without the completions added by others, and stops playing where Schubert halted. Wallisch's performances are sensitive, clean, and stylistically appropriate, and Naxos provides splendid sound throughout. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 14, 2020 | Grand Piano

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Classical - Released July 10, 2020 | CPO

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Classical - Released November 13, 2020 | Grand Piano

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The first volume in this series traced the inter-war craze for carefree dance music in Austria and the Czech Lands. This latest album focuses on Germany where jazz-influenced music flourished from the mid-1920s onwards even in the face of some social, political and racial opposition. Cabarets and dancehalls rejected this nationalist resistance and the Weimar Republic rejoiced in a cross-pollination of symphonic jazz and Kunstjazz - a fusion of dance and classical elements. The many previously unrecorded pieces here chart the progress of this vigorous musical rejuvenation. © Grand Piano Records
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Classical - Released November 2, 2018 | Alpha

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Classical - Released October 28, 2008 | Naxos

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Classical - Released May 1, 2020 | Paladino Music

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Classical - Released September 30, 2007 | Naxos

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Classical - Released March 21, 2006 | Naxos

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The abstract for this disc on its back claims that "...Schubert's Sonatas are now regarded as among the greatest works for piano." That's stretching it for the three particular sonatas included on this disc by Gottlieb Wallisch. These are early sonatas, and they don't quite have the maturity of emotion or construction found in Schubert's more popular late sonatas, which are among the greatest works for piano. Movements that were published separately or were never finished make up Sonatas No. 2 and No. 6, although musicologists agree the movements go together. No. 3 actually is a complete sonata that the publisher inexplicably entitled "Five Pieces." Wallisch plays the sonatas in a rational, pleasing way, more as if they were Mozart or Haydn sonatas. The opening theme of Sonata No. 2 and the second theme of its unfinished finale might normally be more forcefully played, but Wallisch doesn't press them. He balances them against the elegance of the Andante and first theme of the finale. There is a large amount of playfulness in the Sonata No. 3, which Wallisch treats as delicate teasing. His attitude is even banter-like in the Allegro patetico, rather than affected as the tempo marking implies. He puts together all four movements of the Sonata No. 6, which is performed just as frequently in the originally published two-movement version or in a version with just the Scherzo attached. He again doesn't force anything, but keeps any drama modestly in check. Wallisch, throughout, also has a finely detailed and controlled touch that makes each phrase nicely distinct. The sound is satisfactorily warm and not too expansive. It all evokes the scene of one of Schubert's evenings of home music making, with music that is interesting, has attractive melodies and textures, and enough contrast in dynamics and mood to hold attention but not demand the listener's full, emotional involvement. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released July 7, 2015 | Naxos Special Projects