Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Metal - Released June 17, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
From
CD$10.49

Metal - Released June 17, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
This sixth album by the French extreme metallers is a bold step forward into new territory. Having already cemented their place as one of the best technical death metal bands in history, here they broaden their horizons considerably, experimenting with melody, groove, shorter songs, more straightforward structures, and actual singing. This shift from complexity toward accessibility has seen Magma draw comparisons with Metallica's black album, which Gojira have welcomed. Although they have toned down the complexity a bit, the music is still incredibly heavy, and there are still more ideas in this album than most bands manage in an entire career -- from the Middle Eastern soloing of "Silvera" through the brutal, syncopated drum tattoo that drives "The Cell" to the almost liturgical, monastic vocals on the title track and the incredibly harsh, shrieking, industrial guitar effect that shows up periodically. Opener "The Shooting Star" sets the stage for the rest of the album with a sludgy midtempo groove, multi-tracked vocals, a minor-key melody, clean singing, and a veritable wall of guitar. The title track is one of the most progressive on the record, harking back to the band's old-school days with at least five different sections, and is followed up immediately by the one-two punch of a couple of the album's heaviest tracks -- "Pray," blasting along with grinding, djent-inspired riffage, and "Only Pain," where Joe Duplantier roars into the void over a cyclical maelstrom of guitar. But there's almost a pop feel to some of the material here. Both the music and Duplantier's singing style have a '90s vibe, and the chorus on "Stranded" could almost have come off something by one of the sludgier grunge bands, like Alice in Chains or Tad (who were, incidentally, once described by a British music journalist as "the Metallica it's OK to like"). The album ends in stately near-silence with the acoustic instrumental outro "Liberation." The bulk of the lyrics are inspired by the untimely passing of the Duplantier brothers' mother, a subject that has obviously been the cause of much pain but is also handled with grace, sensitivity, and good taste. This album is not going to give Gojira any big pop radio hits, but it will certainly broaden their appeal outside of the death metal ghetto to more general fans of metal and hard rock. © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
From
CD$15.49

Metal - Released June 20, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

From
CD$12.99

Metal - Released June 20, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

From
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Metal - Released August 5, 2020 | Roadrunner Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$11.99
CD$10.49

Metal - Released April 30, 2021 | Roadrunner Records

Hi-Res
When Magma was released in 2016, Gojira unveiled a theretofore hidden facet of the group’s personality: the album, written following the death of the mother of Joe and Mario Duplantier (guitarist/singer and drummer of the group respectively), is a dark introspection shot through with heightened sensitivity and palpable pain. This catharsis set to music no doubt left fans wondering what the follow-up would sound like. The single Another World, released in 2020, gave an early indicator, pointing in a brighter direction which was subsequently confirmed by the groovy and riff-centric Born For One Thing, signalling a return to the group's fundamentals. This proved to be the key for this opus which might just be the triumphant commercial breakthrough of a career that has been in perpetual rise: Gojira meticulously lay out each of the elements which have built their “trademark” sound through the years. Whether it’s raw death (Grind, Into The Storm), more progressive (The Chant, The Trails) or a return to their ethnic influences as on the eponymous title track or Amazonia, Gojira have an immediately identifiable uniqueness. So much so that the four Landes (France) natives can now afford to unleash a Sphinx or New Found, two tracks which are archetypal of their music, without anyone finding fault with it, since the band themselves are the symbolic of these types of combinations. There may not be many surprises, but when viewing Fortitude as a pivotal album, this huge “summary of previous episodes” makes sense. This is a gateway. Because even though the quartet’s work to this point has undoubtedly put France squarely on the worldwide metal map, they’re still miles from tapping into their full potential, a message the group make clear with this seventh clarion-call of an album. Gojira are like a child prodigy grown into an exciting teenage prospect, and now a balanced adult who lives his life as a man. They don't need to show off to be heard: their intelligence is self-evident and has already won them respect. In short, this band is the complete opposite of what our current trash culture offers us. Ultimately, that march against the tide explains why, 20 years after the completely unexpected surprise of Terra Incognita, Gojira’s Fortitude is in full flex, perfectly synthesising the past and looking ever higher and further into the future. © Charlélie Arnaud/Qobuz
From
CD$7.99

Metal - Released May 27, 2014 | Listenable Records

Although their first two efforts, 2000's Terra Incognita and 2003's The Link, had been quite impressive in their own ways, Gojira's third album, 2005's From Mars to Sirius, was the one that really stamped the French quartet's all-pro credentials, gaining them access into the exclusive top echelon of the world's progressive metal elite. Meticulously conceived from the inside out, the record radiated a newfound confidence to match both the unprecedented diversity of its musical palette, and the evocative cover art (featuring a whale adrift amongst mystery planets) representative of its often otherworldly qualities. Yes, the band's primary influences -- Pantera's heavy grooves, Meshuggah's icy technicality, Neurosis' post-metal atmospherics -- were still very evident in complex new musical excursions like "Ocean Planet," "From the Sky," and "The Heaviest Matter in the Universe" (listen for their shared, Dimebag-inspired, jarring guitar-squeal effect). But the way in which Gojira were deconstructing and remixing these influences was something they could now finally, safely, call their own. Certainly, the fluidity with which utmost heaviness and delicate melodies were made to coexist within the scope of single songs like "Where Dragons Dwell," "Flying Whales," and "World to Come," was truly astonishing -- as was the surprisingly seamless flow accomplished by the sequencing of these wildly disparate tracks, and the thematically conjoined esoteric subjects undertaken throughout. The final outcome was still not easy to digest, and admittedly just a tad bit overlong (Gojira's next challenge was definitely to be a little more concise), but compared to most of the impossibly dense (and often exhausting) prog metal available, From Mars to Sirius, struck a close to perfect balance between degree of difficulty and ultimate reward. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
From
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Metal - Released February 17, 2021 | Roadrunner Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$7.99

Metal - Released July 24, 2012 | Listenable Records

From
CD$9.99

Metal - Released April 10, 2007 | Listenable Records

While Gojira's 2000 debut album, Terra Incognita, left many listeners confused about what to make of its schizophrenic combination of extreme metal styles (death, groove, thrash, prog, even metalcore), the French band's second full-length, 2003's The Link, helpfully revealed that this was simply how Gojira "rolled," man. Deal with it, or move on. And so, as it was the first time around, here too, simultaneously intricate and sonically punishing compositions like "Death of Me," "Remembrance," and "Embrace the World" consistently challenged listeners to withstand their dizzying array of Cuisinart-ed styles, presented with a quasi-industrial aesthetic and near-atonal brutality. To enlightened metal heads, such songs will mostly recall Sweden's Meshuggah, minus the distinctive, exotic rhythmic patterns; to neophytes they'll seem like the work of angry machines, grinding along eternally in a post-humanity future. But the aforementioned versatility was also reflected in a few brief, gear-shifting interludes ("Connected," "Torii," "Wisdom Comes"), slower songs augmented by evanescent melodies and white noise sound effects (the title track, "Dawn"), and a pair of unusually concise and less oppressive "singles" in "Indians" and "Over the Flows." All in all, there was just enough variety and discernible human emotion on hand to broaden Gojira's creative reach; though not yet as much as the band would develop on subsequent albums, beginning with the eye-opening leap forward of 2005's From Mars to Sirius. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
From
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Metal - Released March 26, 2021 | Roadrunner Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$1.49

Metal - Released April 22, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

From
CD$1.49

Metal - Released May 20, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

From
CD$1.49

Metal - Released April 27, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

From
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Metal - Released April 25, 2021 | Roadrunner Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Metal - Released April 12, 2021 | Roadrunner Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$0.79

Metal - Released November 4, 2019 | unholy records

From
CD$0.59

Metal - Released August 17, 2015 | Roton

From
CD$0.59

Metal - Released February 17, 2015 | Roton