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Alternative & Indie - Released June 19, 2012 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 29, 2013 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

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For his third studio album, the former leader of The Frames broadens his field of action even more. With Between Two Shores, Glen Hansard is no longer just an icon of contemporary folk rock, but also an all-around musician and songwriter who is willing to venture down new avenues, no matter how surprising they may be. His 2018 edition slaloms between a rock that could almost pass for some Springsteen, an almost chamber choir soul and, of course, deeply moving folk rock. It’s not surprising then that the subtle and genial jazz drummer Brian Blade took part in this sophisticated record. But it’s in the most intimate sequences that Hansard proves to be the most astounding, such as when he blends his voice with a crepuscular trumpet on Wreckless Heart or when he makes his melody grow throughout Movin' On. With restrained organ playing here, heavy brass instruments there (Roll On Slow, Lucky Man), and some dreamy piano parts (Time Will Be The Healer), Glen Hansard orchestrates every moment of his album with real skill. It’s impressive. © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 12, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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The opening track on 2019's This Wild Willing, "I'll Be You, Be Me," begins with a fuzzy rhythm track and a bass patiently thumping over a clanky rhythm machine as Glen Hansard delivers his lyrics in an ominous murmur. Four minutes later it snowballs into a massive tower of cacophony with guitars, keyboards, and strings united in a howling frenzy of sonic force. It's a powerful way to start an album, and while it's easily the set's boldest departure from the introspective but passionate indie folk that has been Hansard's trademark, it sets the stage for a set that finds Hansard pushing his stylistic boundaries. This Wild Willing was primarily written during a four-week working holiday in Paris, and Hansard received input and inspiration from a wide variety of fellow artists, running the gamut from Irish traditional folk instrumentalists to experimental electronic musicians. Hansard merged his subdued but passionate melodies and lyrics with the many musical favors of his collaborators and has given us an album that pushes him forward as a recording artist. The craggy murmur of Hansard's voice turns out to be more versatile than one might imagine, given how well it responds to the forbidding squall of "I'll Be You, Be Me," the slinky sax-accented grooves of "Race to the Bottom," and the stark dynamics of "Fool's Game." Much of the rest of This Wild Willing seems to more readily fit Hansard's typical working method, but there is a rich and spacious sound that producer David Odlum brings to the recordings that, like the flavorful arrangements, doesn't simply give Hansard's compositions a suitable backdrop, but expands them into something deeper and more compelling. Glen Hansard has long been a gifted and effective vocalist and songwriter, but on This Wild Willing, he reveals a greater vision and intelligence in using the studio to give his music life, and it's an unusually strong offering from him. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

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Glen Hansard is an artist who is not afraid to lay bare his soul for his audience to see, but few artists as passionate as Hansard can modulate themselves quite so well; his music is deeply and openly emotional without Hansard sounding as if he's melting into a puddle of melodrama. Hansard's emotional high-wire act is once again the centerpiece of his third full-length solo effort, 2015's Didn't He Ramble, and the album's polished yet rustic modern-folkie sensibility is a splendid backdrop for Hansard's compositions, ten songs that find rays of hope in bad situations while also never missing the bits of rust in his own emotional armor. Didn't He Ramble was cut during sessions in Ireland, England, and the United States, but the set has a warm and unified feel, suggesting the glory days of the '70s singer/songwriter era but with a cleaner and less indulgent sensibility. Hansard's singing is at the top of his game on Didn't He Ramble, unaffected but strong as the soulful edges of his instrument wrap themselves around his songs like a more restrained version of Van Morrison (especially on the gospel-tinged "Her Mercy"). Hansard's accompanists make the most of his lean but evocative melodies, and the string arrangements by Rob Moose and Thomas Bartlett are excellent, adding to the air of mystery in these tunes without giving the performances an unwelcome level of gloss. Didn't He Ramble shows that as a performer and a songwriter, Hansard can create powerful and satisfying work that's up to the standard he set with the Frames, and this is a step up from 2012's impressive but uneven Rhythm and Repose. ~ Mark Deming
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Pop - Released January 17, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 15, 2012 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2018 | Anti - Epitaph

For his third studio album, the former leader of The Frames broadens his field of action even more. With Between Two Shores, Glen Hansard is no longer just an icon of contemporary folk rock, but also an all-around musician and songwriter who is willing to venture down new avenues, no matter how surprising they may be. His 2018 edition slaloms between a rock that could almost pass for some Springsteen, an almost chamber choir soul and, of course, deeply moving folk rock. It’s not surprising then that the subtle and genial jazz drummer Brian Blade took part in this sophisticated record. But it’s in the most intimate sequences that Hansard proves to be the most astounding, such as when he blends his voice with a crepuscular trumpet on Wreckless Heart or when he makes his melody grow throughout Movin' On. With restrained organ playing here, heavy brass instruments there (Roll On Slow, Lucky Man), and some dreamy piano parts (Time Will Be The Healer), Glen Hansard orchestrates every moment of his album with real skill. It’s impressive. © CM/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

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Pop - Released March 5, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 15, 2012 | Anti - Epitaph

The first solo outing from Frames leader and Swell Season co-conspirator Glenn Hansard doubles down on the prolific Irish singer/songwriter's penchant for crafting soulful, slow burn ballads that ache like the sliced-open underbelly of a terminally swollen rain cloud. Inspired by a year-and-a-half stint as a denizen of New York City, as well as his breakup with Swell Season partner Markéta Irglová, the 11-track Rhythm and Repose is as lonely and pained as the face that graces its cover. Hansard's wounded Cat Stevens-esque cadence serves as an excellent bad news delivery system, especially on the sparse piano- and string-laden "The Storm, It's Coming" and the tense, brooding opener "You Will Become," but even the upbeat "Love Don't Leave Me Waiting," with its mid-'70s, blue-eyed soul shuffle and shimmery, Spanish guitar noodling, feels rooted in sleepless, pre-dawn anxiety. There are moments ("High Hope," "Bird of Sorrow") on Rhythm and Repose where Hansard uses the confessional singer/songwriter trope as a front for a much more primal process, allowing songs the room to smoke and sizzle before tossing in the gas can in a fit of explosive melodrama that suggests some of the finer moments from the Frames, but overall, it's a pretty somber affair, conjuring up images of humid, ashtray-filled midnights spent gazing out of a tenth story window, contemplating whether or not the fall would kill or just cripple you. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 22, 2006 | Overcoat Recordings

Alternative & Indie - Released September 14, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 29, 2013 | Anti - Epitaph

Built around a star-studded (production from Joe Henry, guest vocals from Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder, and saxophone from the late, great Clarence Clemons' nephew Jake Clemons) cover of Bruce Springsteen's epic 1980 ballad "Drive All Night" (from The River), this four-song EP from Irish singer/songwriter and actor Glen Hansard (the Frames, the Swell Season) was released to raise money for Little Kids Rock, a nonprofit charity that aims to restore music education in public schools. Hansard and company play it safe on the title cut, offering up an emotionally charged yet largely superfluous (outside of the whole raising-money-for-a-good-cause thing) rendition of Springsteen's ardent paean to working-class heartache, while the three original cuts, the evocative "Pennies in the Fountain," the soulful "Renata," and the empowering, completely a cappella "Step Out of the Shadows" should please fans of the Once star's 2012 solo debut, Rhythm and Repose. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 19, 2016 | Anti - Epitaph

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Rock - Released April 12, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph

Alternative & Indie - Released June 30, 2015 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 31, 2012 | Anti - Epitaph

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 17, 2012 | Anti - Epitaph

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Pop - Released April 9, 2019 | Anti - Epitaph