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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released July 24, 2020 | Gege Produções Artísticas

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 20, 2018 | Palco

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 31, 2014 | Gege Produções Artísticas

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released July 15, 2019 | Gege Produções Artísticas

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1994 | WM Brazil

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 20, 2018 | Palco

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 31, 2014 | Gege Produções Artísticas

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released October 25, 2005 | WM Brazil

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After the hard years dominated by social convulsion in Brazil, in which it was demanded that every artist explicate his political views, the end of dictatorship brought an uncommitted inebriating feel of liberty that was translated into music by Caetano Veloso's "Odara" (where all the composer wanted to do was to dance) to the horror of political activists. This is the Gilberto Gil version of those days. One of his most danceable albums, most songs make it clear that no further considerations are taken into account, just plain Saturday night entertainment. Songs like "Luar," "Palco," "Sonho Molhado" (whose biggest virtue is the use of accordion and other northeastern touches), "Lente do Amor" (with a subtle reference to sexual freedom, which also coincides with Fernando Gabeira's loincloth, from around the same period), "Morena," "Cara Cara" (a frevo by Caetano Veloso interpreted as dance music), the beautiful "Cores Vivas," and "Axé Babá" (with its heavy Afro-Bahian percussion) all have in common the desire for pleasure and the avoidance of deeper questions. The last two songs break this uniformity, though: "Flora" is a delicate bossa with a beautiful melody in Gil's style, in which a melodic sequence is transposed in ascendant manner, and "Se Eu Quiser Falar com Deus" ("If I Want to Talk with God"), a deeply heartfelt slow song where Gil dialogues with his own relationship with religion. The album had several hits ("Palco," "Lente do Amor" -- which was included in a TV series -- "Axé Babá," and "Se Eu Quiser Falar com Deus"), representing a document of a period, and having at least two melodically/lyrically highly expressive songs. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 2002 | Palco WMB

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 20, 2018 | Ensaio Geral | Gege

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 20, 2018 | Ensaio Geral | Gege

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1997 | Palco WMB

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 3, 1975 | Universal Music Ltda.

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Recorded with little rehearsal and only two acoustic guitars (plus a percussionist) for accompaniment, Gil e Jorge focuses squarely on the individual talents of Gilberto Gil and Jorge Ben as musicians, vocalists, performers, and improvisers. Of course, they prove up to the task. The nine lengthy tracks on the album (it was originally configured as a double LP) feature Gil and Ben interacting to a high degree, trading lines and often repeating them several times. The best tracks here -- "Nega," "Taj Mahal," and "Meu Glorioso Sao Cristovao" -- are highly rhythmic and have the heft of ancient Brazilian folksongs. Unfortunately, there isn't another record in Gil's discography even remotely close to it. © John Bush /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 20, 2018 | Ensaio Geral | Gege

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released May 28, 2021 | Gege Produções Artísticas

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World - Released March 20, 2018 | Ensaio Geral | Gege

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 20, 2018 | Gege Produções Artísticas

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released August 17, 2018 | Geleia Geral

Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 20, 2006 | WM Brazil

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Unlike his friend and fellow Brazilian musical legend, Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, through the years, has had a strong tendency to follow the temporary shifts in styles and trends that occur within popular music. Because of this the music of Gil usually has sounded very up to date when it was released, but often his recordings haven't at all aged as gracefully as the timeless music of Caetano Veloso. The tracks on many of the albums of Gilberto Gil have also been of very uneven quality. Refavela is clearly one of the exceptions to this rule. Heavily inspired by traditional African and Afro-Brazilian sounds and rhythms, the songs on this album have aged very well indeed. The title of the album, Refavela, of course, refers to the slum quarters found in the large Brazilian cities, which are called favelas. Among the more famous songs on this album are the beautiful title track, "Refavela," the funky "Babá Alapalá," and the Afro-Brazilian rhythmic "Patuscada de Gandhi" and "Ilê Ayê." There is also a cover of Tom Jobim's "Samba do Avião." Refavela is, without doubt, one of the most consistent and probably the best of all albums recorded by Gilberto Gil. © Philip Jandovský /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released March 20, 2018 | Palco