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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 25, 1999 | Epic - Razor Sharp Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 5, 2018 | X-Ray Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 13, 2019 | Now Generation Music Corp.

Ghostface Killahs is the Wu-Tang rapper's first true solo album in almost five years, following releases co-billed with the likes of Czarface and Big Ghost Ltd. Having left Def Jam in 2010, he's far removed from his major-label days, but even for an independent release, the album gives off the appearance of a low-profile mixtape rather than a studio album. The artwork looks like outtakes from an amateur straight-to-streaming crime movie, with Ghost surrounded by a crew donning cheap presidential masks and bearing weapons. The album itself is brisk, barely lasting half an hour, but it's packed with focused, riveting tracks. Ghost sounds as driven and inspired as ever, and the production, primarily handled by newcomer Danny Caiazzo, has a vintage Wu-Tang sound, filled with booming beats and lush, cinematic backdrops. "Burner to Burner" is laced with fuzzy, rough-edged guitars and eerie reversed vocals, while "Flex" revolves around a deep, aching soul sample. The lyrics typically consist of detailed heist scenes and sexual conquests, with the action-packed cop show caper "The Chase" being a definite high point, but there's a handful of more reflective moments. "New World" has a more laid-back groove and Curtis Mayfield-like chorus vocals by Eamon, with lyrics lamenting the state of the world and calling for resistance and revolution. The album ends with "Soursop," a Jamaican diversion with a sunny, reggae-inspired beat and uplifting vocals. The album seems somewhat patched-together compared to other Ghostface albums, but it still boasts some excellent tracks. The main problem is the blatantly homophobic and misogynistic lyrics which crop up throughout. Not that this is anything new, or unexpected, but it still mars an otherwise strong album. ~ Paul Simpson
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 30, 2018 | X-Ray Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 26, 2018 | Mello Music Group

In 2013, Ghostface Killah recorded Twelve Reasons To Die with producer Adrian Younge. The result: a distillation of groove, an unprecedented orgy of sharp rap and vintage soul. But the Wu-Tang Clan rapper also asked producer Apollo Brown to concoct an alternative version of this album. Dubbed The Brown Tape, it only came out on cassette tape… Five years later, this rarity has officially surfaced - and so much the better! Not least because Ghostface has brought together several Wu-Tang colleagues like Inspectah Deck, U-God, Masta Killa, Cappadonna and RZA are also the narrators here. Behind this concept album that's packed with gangsters, treachery and crime in general, the Detroit producer has thought up a framework that's even dirtier and more punchy than the original. A soundtrack that fits perfectly to Ghostface's prose and his unique flow, which owes more to Wu-Tang than to Twelve Reasons To Die! And what if RZA had produced this Brown Tape all on his own? © MZ/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 13, 1999 | Epic - Razor Sharp Records

Every Wu-Tang Clan solo project has a different flavor, and Ghostface Killah's Ironman is no exception. Though it boasts cameos from nearly every other Wu-Tang member -- notably Raekwon and Cappadonna -- Ironman is unlike any other record in RZA's catalog of productions, particularly because it's significantly lighter in tone. There are still touches of the Wu's signature urban claustrophobia throughout the record, but the music is largely built on samples of early-'70s soul, from Al Green to the Delfonics, who make a guest appearance on "After the Smoke Is Clear." Consequently, the mood of the album can switch tones at the drop of the hat, moving from hard funk like "Daytona 500" to seductive soul with the Mary J. Blige duet "All That I Got Is You." Ironman bogs down slightly in the middle, yet the record is filled with inventive production and rhymes, and ranks as another solid entry in the Wu-Tang legacy. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B - Released July 18, 2000 | Epic - Razor Sharp Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2006 | Def Jam Recordings

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 5, 2014 | Tommy Boy Entertainment, LLC

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 30, 2018 | Linear Labs

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 27, 2000 | Epic - Razor Sharp Records

Most of the members of rap's Roman Empire, the Wu-Tang Clan, experienced sophomore slumps with their second solo releases, whether artistically or commercially (usually both). The second offerings from Method Man, Ol' Dirty Bastard, GZA, and Raekwon featured some of the old Wu magic, but not enough to warrant a claim to their once total mastery of the rap game. Just as the Wu empire appeared to be crumbling, along came the second installment from the Clan's spitfire element, Ghostface Killah (aka Tony Starks, aka Ironman). Every bit as good as his first release, Supreme Clientele proves Ghost's worthiness of the Ironman moniker by deftly overcoming trendiness to produce an authentic sound in hip-hop's age of bland parity. Some of the Wu's slump could be contributed to Wu-Abbott's (aka RZA) relative sabbatical. This album has RZA's stamp all over it, but the guru himself only provides three tracks. On this effort, the Wu-Pupil producers at times seem to outdo their teacher. RZA's best composition is the piano-driven, double-entendre-laced childhood retrospective "Child's Play." But of the many standout cuts, it's the slew of disciple producers paying homage to the Wu legacy that truly makes this album fresh-sounding: "Apollo Kids" (Hassan), "Malcolm" (Choo the Specialist), "Saturday Nite" (Carlos "Six July" Broady), "One" (JuJu of the Beatnuts), "Cherchez la Ghost" (Carlos Bess), "Wu Banga 101" (Allah Mathematics). While the album is complete and characteristically Wu-sounding, each track is distinctive lyrically, thematically, and sonically. Ghostface's Supreme Clientele is a step toward the Wu-Tang Clan's ascent from the ashes of their fallen kingdom. The once slumbering Wu-Tang strikes again. ~ M.F. DiBella
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 8, 2000 | Epic - Razor Sharp Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2006 | Def Jam Recordings

Loosely speaking, More Fish is to Fishscale what Theodore Unit's 718 was to The Pretty Toney Album, albeit with more focus on Ghostface. While the title of this disc seems synonymous with Have Some Leftovers, it's not at all stale, if not nearly as spectacular as its precursor. Again, Ghostface showcases Trife da God, Cappadonna, Shawn Wigs, and Solomon Childs, while Sun God (Ghostface's son), Killa Sin, Sheek Louch, Redman, and a few others also assist. Ghost goes it alone on four tracks, and three others are left strictly in the hands of his protégés. With the exception of weak link Wigs, each one of them continues to improve. Unsurprisingly, Ghostface's performances are never outstripped by those of the other MCs, and no track -- with the exception of the tacked-on "Back Like That" remix -- makes any kind of commercial concession. Since Fishscale wasn't even close to going gold at the time of the disc's release, it's obvious that More Fish was issued to get the instant sales of Ghost's devout fanbase. "Guns 'n' Razors," "Outta Town Sh*t," and "Block Rock" generate the trademark breakneck high adventure, with Ghost on full, furious blast. Apropos of nothing, one of "Block Rock"'s tangents is an amped-up dismissal of Lil Jon: "If Little Jon could ice his cup, I'd chop that sh*t, it'd ice my nuts." After that, the intensity drops for several tracks, regained temporarily by "Alex (Stolen Script)," where Ghost makes the life of a fledgling movie mogul sound as dramatic and nearly as twisted as the crack trade. In the "too much information" department: when, in "Street Opera," Ghost recalls exploits shared with his son, "We ran trains for hours up in the Days Inn" probably has nothing to do with a dictionary's definition of "train" (unless, of course, your source is www.urbandictionary.com. ~ Andy Kellman
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 5, 2014 | Tommy Boy Entertainment, LLC

Booklet
With a title that refers to nine years away from home, 36 Seasons finds Wu-Tang rapper Ghostface Killah returning to his Tony Starks character, who is himself returning home to a different and more dangerous Staten Island. Starks is just looking to spend his later years chilling in familiar territory, but as the action movie lyrics and the accompanying comic book written by Matthew Rosenberg, explain, betrayal and Berettas are everywhere, so Starks dons his gas mask and schools the hood on what's good. The concept and presentation are wonderfully reminiscent of the rapper's 2013 collaboration with Adrian Younge, Twelve Reasons to Die, but if that excellent album was influenced by the Italian murder mystery/slasher film genre known as giallo, this one is bringing '70s Blaxploitation films back with all their funk and flare. Brooklyn band and production team the Revelations provide the funk, with wah-wah guitars, punchy drums, and popping bass creating an atmosphere where karate chops, pimps, and players are all in their element. This is also the atmosphere where comic book choruses like "Exquisite doctor, his work of art/Created a gas mask to save Tony Starks" ("Emergency Procedure" with Pharoahe Monch) become great singalong moments with an accompanying fist-in-the-air. Cooler, cinematic numbers thrive as well, and with that unique Ghostface style, like when "Homicide" goes from macabre ("I smell a massacre/I stick a bomb in your limo, blow up your passengers") to chuckle-worthy ("I'm stuck back on the couch like a potato"). Inspiration flows out of the man throughout the album, and this end-to-end concept is executed with little note-spinning or boring lyrics that just serve the story, and while Twelve Reasons took a big giallo risk and nailed it, this more expected, '70s-favored success still surprises with its vigorous sense of purpose. Besides Monch's appearance, Kool G Rap, Tre Williams, and AZ offer some great moments, while producer the 45 King joins the Revelations on "Blood on the Streets" for that old-school breakbeat rumble. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 16, 2001 | Epic - Razor Sharp Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2009 | RAL

Take that word "Poetry" with a grain of salt and then check your expectations at the door, because Ghostdini the Wizard of Poetry is a significant departure for Ghostface Killah, at least when it comes to the album format. This oversexed, always fun, and occasionally hilarious effort was inspired by the rapper's previous work with R&B artists, although the production -- from Scram Jones, Skymark, the J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League, and others -- goes way back, sampling smooth soul folks like Marvin Gaye, Joe Simon, and Love, Peace & Happiness. Unlike his GhostDeini guise, this new Ghostdini character is a lover plus a pimp more than a player, hanging in the "Guest House" with "Glass pianos and Portuguese drapes hangin' from the ceiling/Persian rugs, Moroccan sofas/I walk through the house in paisley robes and Ferragamo loafers." Things don't always go right for this cool customer, as both "Guest House" and "Lonely" are bitter, brokenhearted highlights, and being suave isn't always the rule as "Stapleton Sex" gets the seven dirty words off within the first ten seconds and then proceeds to describe a Hustler cartoon. The cause and effect of sex are covered on the great slow jam "Baby" ("I'm all right, it's just that the baby's kickin'/And I want some Popeye's chicken, and my back kinda hurts from the way I was sittin'/Hurry home so you can rub my big belly and kiss it"), and after the slick "Goner" pleases with some George Benson-like guitar, the album goes modern with two great "bonus tracks," "She's a Killah" and the Kanye West plus Ne-Yo showcase "Back Like That." Nasty as he wants to be, Ghostdini is nothing more than the Face and friends having a good time. The results are as improper as they are infectious. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 27, 2014 | RAL

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 26, 2015 | Linear Labs

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2010 | RAL

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 27, 2002 | Epic