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Rock - Released January 1, 1990 | Virgin Records

Relieved from the pressures of having to record a hit single, Gary Moore cuts loose on some blues standards as well as some newer material. Moore plays better than ever, spitting out an endless stream of fiery licks that are both technically impressive and soulful. It's no wonder Still Got the Blues was his biggest hit. © David Jehnzen /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 24, 2012 | Mercury Studios

Both Jimi Hendrix and Gary Moore played guitar and sang with the soul of bluesmen and the drive of hard rockers. So who better to pay tribute to Hendrix at an August 2007 London Experience Hendrix launch of Hendrix's Live at Monterey reissued DVD than the veteran Moore? And to add more gravitas to the post-DVD presentation concert, Experience drummer Mitch Mitchell and Band of Gypsys bassist Billy Cox joined Moore for three tunes near the end of the 80-minute-long set. The DVD, Blu-Ray, and CD (all available separately) capture the amped-up excitement of the night as Moore and his regular touring duo tear though some of Hendrix's biggest hits with the ferocity that Moore brings to every gig. The only criticism is the set list, which trots out the usual suspects of Hendrix's early catalog ("Fire," "Foxy Lady," "Purple Haze," "The Wind Cries Mary") which are overplayed. Whether Moore had control over that or was instructed to play tunes that hewed closely to those from the Monterey Hendrix performance is unclear. But even though he doesn't exactly make them his own, the Irish guitarist brings plenty of sweat and intensity to those warhorses. He also adds the less well-known "I Don't Live Today," which, in light of Moore's untimely 2011 passing, is strangely and sadly prophetic. An emotional six-minute reading of "Angel," prefaced by a frantic guitar improv instrumental oddly named "My Angel" that displays Moore's chops, gives him a chance to get sensitive on one of Hendrix's most ghostly and beautiful tunes. The "blues" in the album's title is spotlighted as Mitchell and Cox kick off their 25-minute guest appearance with a fiery, 11-minute "Red House," arguably the night's highlight. Cox's basslines find a deep groove (he also sings the song) and Moore is clearly in his element, whipping off solos that shift from sweet and jazzy to biting and raw. The threesome had only rehearsed once the day before, and that lack of preparation nearly sinks "Stone Free," also sung by Cox, where things get a little too ragged. But they bounce back for a punchy, nine-minute "Hey Joe" that captures the spirit of Hendrix's version while providing Moore a platform for his own six-string acrobatics that organically build to a crescendo even Hendrix would have applauded. The DVD shows how much the trio is enjoying itself, but even the audio is evidence that Moore is in his natural habitat with this material, and playing with Hendrix's sidemen is clearly a thrill. He brings back his own band for a closing ten-minute "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" that puts an exclamation point on an already outstanding performance. Why it stayed in the vaults for five years until its 2012 release is unclear, but this is a lightning-in-a-bottle treat to be savored by both Moore and Hendrix fans. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1993 | Virgin Records

4 Stars - Excellent - "...You get from Moore what you crave in vain from Clapton--melody, power, flash, that fluid, smoking guitar sound, and the permanent grimace of a revved-up virtuoso with one foot on earth and the other on the live rail..." © TiVo
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Metal - Released January 1, 1985 | Virgin Records

Run for Cover took the heavy metal ingredients of Gary Moore's previous two albums and added a little pop refinement to the mix. Thankfully, this did not compromise the overall heaviness of the record, and Moore even achieves a successful remake of his classic ballad "Empty Rooms." Calling on his many friends to help in the studio, Moore obtains fantastic vocal performances from former Deep Purple bassist/vocalist Glenn Hughes on "Reach for the Sky" and "All Messed Up," and former Thin Lizzy leader and childhood friend Philip Lynott on the dramatic "Military Man." The latter also trades vocals with Moore on the album's biggest single, "Out in the Fields." Written about the religious turmoil in their native Ireland, it was actually Lynott's final recorded performance before his tragic death. It also presaged the musical and lyrical Irish themes which would dominate Moore's future work. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Virgin

In 2003, the folks in England finally got an official release of the 1995 U.S. Gary Moore collection Ballads & Blues, 1982-1994, retitled The Essential Gary Moore. As its original title suggested, the 14-track collection bypasses Moore's '80s-era heavy metal excursions in favor of his power ballads from the same decade and his bluesy rebirth of the early '90s. The best-known tracks of the bunch remain "Still Got the Blues (For You)" and a live take of "Parisienne Walkways" (which in his review of Ballads & Blues, Ed Rivadavia fittingly points out are both carbon copies of each other), but other lesser-known highlights are featured. Tops include the slow-burning blues of "Jumpin' at Shadows," the synth-heavy yet haunting "Johnny Boy," and the acoustic "With Love" (not to be confused with the Moore-era Thin Lizzy song of the same name). Also included is the schmaltzy ballad "Empty Rooms," a track that has probably been featured on more Gary Moore recordings than any other. If you're in the U.S., instead of shelling out the extra bucks for The Essential Gary Moore import edition, save your money and get the more affordable Ballads & Blues (or better yet, go for a more comprehensive Moore collection, such as 1998's Out in the Fields: The Very Best of Gary Moore). © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 1, 1984 | Virgin Catalogue

This album is a jaw-dropping affair for anyone who believes that Eddie Van Halen is the ultimate guitar-shredding experience. Gary Moore's classic live album We Want Moore! is about as good as it gets. Drawing mainly from the Irish guitarist's previous two studio albums, every cut gets a shot in the arm from Moore's extended soloing, most notably the Yardbird's "Shapes of Things" at almost nine minutes. Recorded in places as distant as Tokyo, Glasgow and Detroit, the performances also benefit from the impressive vocal tag team between Moore and rhythm guitarist Neil Carter. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1989 | Virgin Records

This album attempted to repeat the pop-metal formula of Gary Moore's 1985 album, Run for Cover, but falls short for various reasons. First, the songwriting wasn't quite up to par and except for "Over the Hills and Far Away, the title track, and "The Loner" - a beautifully moody guitar instrumental, Moore seemed to be going through the motions. Second, and most fatal was the decision to use a drum machine throughout the album; a failed experiment which just plain sounds wrong. Still, this is hardly a bad record, just slightly disappointing. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 31, 2020 | Provogue Records

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In 2009, just over a year before his untimely death, the late, great Irish bluesman played an intimate set at London's Islington Academy which has since gone down in legend among his fans. Recorded for posterity, it appeared in January 2020. Featuring Moore at the top of his game, it includes some of his best-loved tunes including "Since I Met You Baby," "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know," "Walking by Myself," and the classic "Parisienne Walkways." © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1994 | Virgin Records

This ill-advised compilation rudely splices early ballads from Gary Moore's "metal period" ("Empty Rooms," "Johnny Boy") with his better-known latter-day blues experiments ("Midnight Blues," "Story of the Blues"). It's mostly solid material notwithstanding; however, this record can only be described as a doomed marriage -- the kind that could only have made sense to awful people like record company execs. Even worse, the record exposes the troubling similarity between 1979's "Parisienne Walkways" (co-written by Thin Lizzy main man Phil Lynott) and 1990's "Still Got the Blues" (Moore's biggest stateside success) in a blatant case of self-plagiarism. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1995 | Virgin Records

Gary Moore's tribute to Fleetwood Mac guitarist Peter Green, Blues for Greeny, is more of a showcase for Moore's skills than Green's songwriting. After all, Green was more famous for his technique than his writing. Consequently, Moore uses Green's songs as a starting point, taking them into new territory with his own style. And Moore positively burns throughout Blues for Greeny, tearing off licks with ferocious intensity. If anything, the album proves that Moore is at his best when interpreting other people's material -- it easily ranks as one of his finest albums. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Blues - Released March 12, 2001 | Castle Communications

Six years after his successful tribute to Peter Green, Gary Moore follows with another solid electric blues-rock effort that falls squarely in line with his similarly themed albums Still Got the Blues, After Hours, and Blues Alive. Although he adds brass on a rollicking version of B.B. King's "You Upset Me Baby," Moore predominantly sticks to the basics here, pounding out energetic and full-bodied blues-rock and leading a stripped-down trio with a journeyman's enthusiasm and his trademark thick, sustained guitar solos slashing through the proceedings. The majority of the tracks are originals, although even the best of them sound suspiciously like rewritten blues standards. "Cold Black Night" is little more than a speeded-up "Messin' With the Kid," and "Picture of the Moon" sounds awfully similar to Moore's own "Still Got the Blues." And whether the world needs yet another version of "Stormy Monday" or "I Ain't Got You" is debatable. But Moore pulls off even the most clichéd material with his phenomenal prowess; supple, identifiable vocals; and a guitar tone that effortlessly shifts from a Santana/Peter Green-styled hovering intensity to a slashing Stevie Ray Vaughan attack. While Moore isn't redefining the genre or even his own approach to it, he's adding his stamp to blues-rock with Back to the Blues. Consistently rugged, moving, and heartfelt, the album is a reminder that even without reinventing an established musical style, an artist can effectively work within its boundaries to produce a satisfying, if not quite fresh, interpretation relying solely on talent and passion. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 10, 2002 | Sanctuary Records

After spending over a decade churning out electrified blues, Gary Moore partially returns to his hard rock beginnings in Scars. Reminiscent of '60s power trios such as Cream and especially the Jimi Hendrix Experience ("World of Confusion" is practically a rewrite of "Manic Depression" and "Ball and Chain" borrows the riff from "Voodoo Child"), Moore hasn't abandoned the blues, he's just pumped it up with blustery retro roots rock. With all the genre's limitations, the guitarist is so obviously inspired in this format that the album is a success on its own terms, even though it breaks little new ground. "Wasn't Born in Chicago" infuses jazzy drums and slight electronics to enhance the basic three-piece assault, resulting in the album's most unique and arguably best performance. Moore's pacing also helps as he softens his attack on ballads like "Just Can't Let You Go" and the closing "Who Knows (What Tomorrow May Bring)?" He effectively shifts from tender to tense to explosive in seconds and, even on the nearly 13-minute "Ball and Chain," keeps the listener involved through a combination of six-string talent, full-bodied vocals, and a sense of dynamics. Occupying a well-worn space with a potent fusion of blues power and hard rock, Scars shows Gary Moore comfortable in his skin. It's a rugged if not terribly original fusion that succeeds due to his talent, enthusiasm, and no-frills approach. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Blues - Released June 7, 2004 | Castle Communications

After a brief return to his hard rock roots in 2002's Scars, guitarist Gary Moore comes back to the blues where his heart seems to be. But really, Moore's forte is his knack of combining the meaty licks and rugged tone from his gutsy rock to energize the electric blues music he has embraced since 1990's Still Got the Blues. To that end, Scars' drummer Darrin Mooney returns and Bob Daisley, veteran of such thundering outfits as Ozzy Osbourne's band, Uriah Heep and Rainbow, joins on bass. Hence this album's title is appropriate, since the power trio format pounds out this music with clenched-fist authority. Moore is an exceptionally tasty musician but even when the amps are turned up to eleven, as they are for most of this disc, there is feeling in his fiery licks. The originals that dominate are little more than rewritten established blues riffs and his songs are predominantly vehicles for his explosive, wah-wah-heavy attacks. Covers of Willie Dixon's "Evil" and "I Can't Quit You Baby" don't take the tunes anywhere they haven't been before (the latter copies Led Zeppelin's version almost down to the note) but Moore wrings enough guts out of them to make his renderings well-worth hearing, if not essential. A crawling take on Percy Mayfield's "Memory Pain" drags the standard on to Moore's playing field, but maintains the original's sense of sorrow. The guitarist's understated imprint is also evident on ballads like "That's Why I Play the Blues" where his low-key vocals and lighter touch are surprisingly poignant. He seems to be having a ball throughout, singing and playing with the loose authority that only 35 years as a professional musician allows. Moore is especially convincing and enthusiastic on the jazzy, walking bass propelled "Can't Find My Baby," a nice change-up from the album's predominantly charging tone. The creeping menace of the closing "Torn Inside" also shows how Moore uses subtle dynamics and a less-is-more tactic borrowed from his mentor Peter Green, to ramp up the drama. There's nothing here Moore hasn't done previously, but it's another stellar entry into his bulging catalog and a great place for hard rock fans to jump aboard the blues train. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 21, 1983 | Sanctuary Records

Although he'd probably beg to disagree, Gary Moore's worst enemy throughout his career has arguably been his own eclecticism; a distinct lack of focus which has regularly seen him swinging back and forth between the roles of heavy metal guitar hero and blues purist (and everything in between: Irish folk music, jazz fusion, you name it). And while the second half of his career saw him capable of focusing on both the blues and hard rock/metal with some consistency, 1984's Dirty Fingers is very much a document of those early, restless years. Originally recorded in 1980 but shelved in deference to the far more radio-oriented material released in its stead as the one-off G Force album that same year (yes, another detour by Moore), Dirty Fingers' tracks are generally characterized by a raw, uncompromising heavy rock aesthetic -- hence the title. As such, tough, virile rockers invariably slathered in frenetic six-string fretwork abound (see "Hiroshima," "Kidnapped" "Lonely Night") but, with the exception of the unapologetically nasty "Run to Your Mama," these tend to fall well short of the material heard on 1979's Back on the Streets and its "official" successor, Corridors of Power, three years later. A cover of the Animals' "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" is similarly lackluster; "Rest in Peace" is just another example of Moore's typically bland '80s balladry; "Really Gonna Rock" sounds like an early version of "Rockin' Every Night"; and the one-minute title track is merely a sketch for the electrifying solo later used to introduce Corridors of Power's epic "End of the World" (for which this album's "Bad News" was partly cannibalized, as well). But there is at least one other career highlight to be found on Dirty Fingers, and that's the bombastic "Nuclear Attack" (yet another of Moore's apocalyptic warnings), which, amid massive riffs that keep it rocking like a motherf**ker, unveils a simple but effective counterpoint synthesizer theme that one could very well assume inspired Europe to write "The Final Countdown." Also know that most of the above find Moore sharing lead vocals with former Ted Nugent singer Charlie Huhn for the first and final time, and you'll have all you need to know about Dirty Fingers -- an interesting but not essential Gary Moore album. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 30, 2003 | Sanctuary Records

Power guitarist Gary Moore's Live at Monsters of Rock is a dream come true for every guitar freak out there. Teamed with his trio of Cass Lewis and Darrin Mooney, Moore turns it up to 14 and powers his way through razored, crunching covers of the Yardbirds' "Shapes of Things" and Free's "Wishing Well" before delving into his own rather voluminous catalog. Performances of the riff-laden "Rectify," the bluesed-out "Stand Up," and the completely adrenaline-fueled metal of "Out in the Fields" take this over the top. But the final track, a deeply moving version of "Pariesienne Walkways," is a fitting tribute to the tune's original vocalist and former Thin Lizzy bandmate Phil Lynott. There is nothing but pure power here -- no restraint, no mixing, no overdubs, nothing but pure Monsters of Rock power. This is the guitar record Moore had been promising his entire career. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | EMI Gold

Although he took a pop-metal detour during the '80s, guitarist Gary Moore was always a blues-rock guitarist at heart. After all, his chief instrument throughout his career has been a Les Paul that once belonged to Fleetwood Mac's Peter Green, and he played on the original version of Thin Lizzy's slow-burning bluesy tour de force "Still in Love With You." By the dawn of the '90s, Moore had grown tired of trying to keep pace with the Def Leppards of the rock world, and returned to his original love. The move paid off immediately for Moore, as 1990's Still Got the Blues was a worldwide hit, and as a result, the guitarist continued with this direction for much of the decade. The 2004 12-track compilation Blues Collection is true to its title, as it includes the cream of this aforementioned rootsy era. Moore sounds reinvigorated on much of the material here, especially "Oh Pretty Woman" (nope, not the Roy Orbison song of the same name), "Walking By Myself," and "Cold Day in Hell." Also included is the Phil Lynott-penned classic from the late '70s, "Parisienne Walkways," and the George Harrison-penned "That Kind of Woman," which proves to be a break from the blues (it would have fit comfortably on a Traveling Wilburys album). But one glaring omission prevents Blues Collection from being the definitive Moore blues collection -- the title track from Still Got the Blues, which just so happens to be arguably Moore's best blues track of them all. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 30, 1980 | Sanctuary Records

After cooperating with Phil Lynott on Back on the Streets, Gary Moore moved to L.A. and formed the group G-Force with Willie Dee, Tony Newton, and drummer Mark Nauseef. The group did not hold together much longer than it took to finish the first album, and on its re-release on CD, only Moore gets credit. But the album they left behind, also named G-Force, is clearly underrated. As expected, it does contain the elements that would later make Moore famous, like hard rock riffs and long instrumental solos. Looking for this, listen to "White Knuckles/Rockin' and Rollin'," which would stay in his repertoire for a long time. But the album also shows a side later hardly seen. "Hot Gossip" and "The Woman's in Love" are catchy pop tunes that, except for the guitars, have more in common with Elvis Costello than with Moore's coming albums, or with the weird boogie rock of Grinding Stone. These tracks could appeal to a pop audience if they would ever find them, which is unlikely. And surprisingly, these are two of the tracks written exclusively by Moore. Yes, one can suspect that some of the humor of the quirky choruses is unintentional, but the timing is perfect. But if underrated, the album still holds problems for the buyer. Except for the apparent difficulty of appealing to two different audiences, the album also contains a few tracks ranking among Moore's worst. So despite a number of great songs, G-Force is probably best bought by listeners who want to find a few unexpected gems. It may contain too few true Gary Moore songs for rock fans and too many guitar solos for pop fans. In 1990 the album was re-released on CD by Castle Communications. © Lars Lovén /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 21, 1983 | Sanctuary Records

This live album, recorded circa 1980 at London's Marquee Club, is a mixed bag, featuring material from Gary Moore's 1979 solo album Back on the Streets and his band project G Force. Most impressive, perhaps, is the incredible musicianship in this performance from Moore and drummer Tommy Aldridge. Besides rocking out with "Back on the Streets" and "Run to Your Mama," the band locks into a great groove on "She's Got You." But they reach an absolute peak with a beautiful rendition of Moore's first U.K. hit, the instrumental ballad "Parisienne Walkways," a melody so lovely that Moore plagiarized himself 12 years later, tweaking it only slightly to create his hit "Still Got the Blues." © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Blues - Released April 30, 2021 | Provogue Records

How Blue Can You Get collects a selection of unreleased material from the late Gary Moore's archives. Included are takes of Freddie King's "I'm Tore Down," Elmore James' "Done Somebody Wrong," and Memphis Slim's "Steppin' Out," alongside some of Moore's own material. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 1, 2006 | Virgin Catalogue