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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Mercury Studios

This five-disc box collects as many complete concerts by Irish blues-rock guitarist Gary Moore, recorded in 1990, 1995, 1997, 1999, and 2001 at the Montreux Jazz Festival. Some might call this too much material, especially given the number of songs that recur (four versions of "All Your Love," three each of "Oh Pretty Woman," "Too Tired," and "You Don't Love Me," and two each of "The Blues Is Alright," "Further on Up the Road," "Need Your Love So Bad," "Parisienne Walkways," "Since I Met You Baby," "Still Got the Blues," "Stop Messing Around," and "Walking by Myself"), but there is in fact substantial variation from disc to disc. The obvious outlier is the 1990 disc, on which Moore is joined for four superlative songs by legendary Texas guitarist Albert Collins. But the 1997 concert finds Moore moving from straight Chicago-style blues to an alternative metal roar, the guitar cranked up ferociously loud and backed by a mix of live instruments, occasionally chintzy synths, and programmed beats. By 1999, he's returned to the blues, albeit a hard-rocking version that's still closer in spirit to Blueshammer than Buddy Guy. The 2001 set is a mixed bag, running the gamut from a restrained take on "Stormy Monday" to an almost punk rock sprint through Jimi Hendrix's "Fire" and the amp-frying closing instrumental "The Prophet." At each concert, he's backed by a sympathetic and skilled band (including horns in 1990 and 1995), which only draws attention to one of this set's biggest flaws -- the total lack of information. Concert dates are provided, but no personnel listings or songwriting credits. It's a shame that the backing musicians are so ill-served, but otherwise, any serious Moore fan would do well to pick this set up and spend an afternoon or two wallowing in six hours of screaming blues-rock guitar. © Phil Freeman /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1983 | Virgin Records

Gary Moore might just be the greatest guitar hero America's never heard of, probably because only his recent blues recordings have benefited from proper distribution stateside. In fact, Moore has worn so many hats during his near 30-year career that the words eclectic and unfocused immediately come to mind. Victims of the Future arrived in the middle of the most consistent phase of his career -- that of a heavy metal guitar slinger. Between the epic cold war-inspired title track and the massive riffing of "Murder in the Skies" (written about the Korean airliner shot own by Russian fighter jets), Moore assaults the listener with more guitar notes than appear in most careers. These are great songs though, and his powerful vocals are also very effective, especially on the hit ballad "Empty Rooms." None of Moore's recordings are very easy to find in America, but make sure this is the first one you look for. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 1, 1982 | Virgin Records

This is the first of Irish guitar virtuoso Gary Moore's true heavy metal albums. Boasting a crisp, aggressive sound, Corridors of Power kicks off with the foot-stomping "Don't Take Me for a Loser," delivers the token power ballad in "Always Gonna Love You," and floors the gas pedal on "Rockin' Every Night." However, the album's climax has to be the epic "End of the World," with it's two-minute long guitar solo intro and vocals courtesy of Cream's Jack Bruce. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Blues - Released September 22, 2014 | Eagle Rock - Eagle Records

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Rock - Released September 10, 2002 | Sanctuary Records

After spending over a decade churning out electrified blues, Gary Moore partially returns to his hard rock beginnings in Scars. Reminiscent of '60s power trios such as Cream and especially the Jimi Hendrix Experience ("World of Confusion" is practically a rewrite of "Manic Depression" and "Ball and Chain" borrows the riff from "Voodoo Child"), Moore hasn't abandoned the blues, he's just pumped it up with blustery retro roots rock. With all the genre's limitations, the guitarist is so obviously inspired in this format that the album is a success on its own terms, even though it breaks little new ground. "Wasn't Born in Chicago" infuses jazzy drums and slight electronics to enhance the basic three-piece assault, resulting in the album's most unique and arguably best performance. Moore's pacing also helps as he softens his attack on ballads like "Just Can't Let You Go" and the closing "Who Knows (What Tomorrow May Bring)?" He effectively shifts from tender to tense to explosive in seconds and, even on the nearly 13-minute "Ball and Chain," keeps the listener involved through a combination of six-string talent, full-bodied vocals, and a sense of dynamics. Occupying a well-worn space with a potent fusion of blues power and hard rock, Scars shows Gary Moore comfortable in his skin. It's a rugged if not terribly original fusion that succeeds due to his talent, enthusiasm, and no-frills approach. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Blues - Released June 7, 2004 | Castle Communications

After a brief return to his hard rock roots in 2002's Scars, guitarist Gary Moore comes back to the blues where his heart seems to be. But really, Moore's forte is his knack of combining the meaty licks and rugged tone from his gutsy rock to energize the electric blues music he has embraced since 1990's Still Got the Blues. To that end, Scars' drummer Darrin Mooney returns and Bob Daisley, veteran of such thundering outfits as Ozzy Osbourne's band, Uriah Heep and Rainbow, joins on bass. Hence this album's title is appropriate, since the power trio format pounds out this music with clenched-fist authority. Moore is an exceptionally tasty musician but even when the amps are turned up to eleven, as they are for most of this disc, there is feeling in his fiery licks. The originals that dominate are little more than rewritten established blues riffs and his songs are predominantly vehicles for his explosive, wah-wah-heavy attacks. Covers of Willie Dixon's "Evil" and "I Can't Quit You Baby" don't take the tunes anywhere they haven't been before (the latter copies Led Zeppelin's version almost down to the note) but Moore wrings enough guts out of them to make his renderings well-worth hearing, if not essential. A crawling take on Percy Mayfield's "Memory Pain" drags the standard on to Moore's playing field, but maintains the original's sense of sorrow. The guitarist's understated imprint is also evident on ballads like "That's Why I Play the Blues" where his low-key vocals and lighter touch are surprisingly poignant. He seems to be having a ball throughout, singing and playing with the loose authority that only 35 years as a professional musician allows. Moore is especially convincing and enthusiastic on the jazzy, walking bass propelled "Can't Find My Baby," a nice change-up from the album's predominantly charging tone. The creeping menace of the closing "Torn Inside" also shows how Moore uses subtle dynamics and a less-is-more tactic borrowed from his mentor Peter Green, to ramp up the drama. There's nothing here Moore hasn't done previously, but it's another stellar entry into his bulging catalog and a great place for hard rock fans to jump aboard the blues train. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 21, 1983 | Sanctuary Records

Although he'd probably beg to disagree, Gary Moore's worst enemy throughout his career has arguably been his own eclecticism; a distinct lack of focus which has regularly seen him swinging back and forth between the roles of heavy metal guitar hero and blues purist (and everything in between: Irish folk music, jazz fusion, you name it). And while the second half of his career saw him capable of focusing on both the blues and hard rock/metal with some consistency, 1984's Dirty Fingers is very much a document of those early, restless years. Originally recorded in 1980 but shelved in deference to the far more radio-oriented material released in its stead as the one-off G Force album that same year (yes, another detour by Moore), Dirty Fingers' tracks are generally characterized by a raw, uncompromising heavy rock aesthetic -- hence the title. As such, tough, virile rockers invariably slathered in frenetic six-string fretwork abound (see "Hiroshima," "Kidnapped" "Lonely Night") but, with the exception of the unapologetically nasty "Run to Your Mama," these tend to fall well short of the material heard on 1979's Back on the Streets and its "official" successor, Corridors of Power, three years later. A cover of the Animals' "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" is similarly lackluster; "Rest in Peace" is just another example of Moore's typically bland '80s balladry; "Really Gonna Rock" sounds like an early version of "Rockin' Every Night"; and the one-minute title track is merely a sketch for the electrifying solo later used to introduce Corridors of Power's epic "End of the World" (for which this album's "Bad News" was partly cannibalized, as well). But there is at least one other career highlight to be found on Dirty Fingers, and that's the bombastic "Nuclear Attack" (yet another of Moore's apocalyptic warnings), which, amid massive riffs that keep it rocking like a motherf**ker, unveils a simple but effective counterpoint synthesizer theme that one could very well assume inspired Europe to write "The Final Countdown." Also know that most of the above find Moore sharing lead vocals with former Ted Nugent singer Charlie Huhn for the first and final time, and you'll have all you need to know about Dirty Fingers -- an interesting but not essential Gary Moore album. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 30, 2003 | Sanctuary Records

Power guitarist Gary Moore's Live at Monsters of Rock is a dream come true for every guitar freak out there. Teamed with his trio of Cass Lewis and Darrin Mooney, Moore turns it up to 14 and powers his way through razored, crunching covers of the Yardbirds' "Shapes of Things" and Free's "Wishing Well" before delving into his own rather voluminous catalog. Performances of the riff-laden "Rectify," the bluesed-out "Stand Up," and the completely adrenaline-fueled metal of "Out in the Fields" take this over the top. But the final track, a deeply moving version of "Pariesienne Walkways," is a fitting tribute to the tune's original vocalist and former Thin Lizzy bandmate Phil Lynott. There is nothing but pure power here -- no restraint, no mixing, no overdubs, nothing but pure Monsters of Rock power. This is the guitar record Moore had been promising his entire career. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 28, 2009 | Mercury Studios

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Blues - Released January 1, 1984 | Virgin Catalogue

This album is a jaw-dropping affair for anyone who believes that Eddie Van Halen is the ultimate guitar-shredding experience. Gary Moore's classic live album We Want Moore! is about as good as it gets. Drawing mainly from the Irish guitarist's previous two studio albums, every cut gets a shot in the arm from Moore's extended soloing, most notably the Yardbird's "Shapes of Things" at almost nine minutes. Recorded in places as distant as Tokyo, Glasgow and Detroit, the performances also benefit from the impressive vocal tag team between Moore and rhythm guitarist Neil Carter. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2003 | EMI Gold

Although he took a pop-metal detour during the '80s, guitarist Gary Moore was always a blues-rock guitarist at heart. After all, his chief instrument throughout his career has been a Les Paul that once belonged to Fleetwood Mac's Peter Green, and he played on the original version of Thin Lizzy's slow-burning bluesy tour de force "Still in Love With You." By the dawn of the '90s, Moore had grown tired of trying to keep pace with the Def Leppards of the rock world, and returned to his original love. The move paid off immediately for Moore, as 1990's Still Got the Blues was a worldwide hit, and as a result, the guitarist continued with this direction for much of the decade. The 2004 12-track compilation Blues Collection is true to its title, as it includes the cream of this aforementioned rootsy era. Moore sounds reinvigorated on much of the material here, especially "Oh Pretty Woman" (nope, not the Roy Orbison song of the same name), "Walking By Myself," and "Cold Day in Hell." Also included is the Phil Lynott-penned classic from the late '70s, "Parisienne Walkways," and the George Harrison-penned "That Kind of Woman," which proves to be a break from the blues (it would have fit comfortably on a Traveling Wilburys album). But one glaring omission prevents Blues Collection from being the definitive Moore blues collection -- the title track from Still Got the Blues, which just so happens to be arguably Moore's best blues track of them all. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 1, 2008 | Mercury Studios

Another year, another Gary Moore blues-rock album nearly interchangeable with the last. That's no problem for fans or even newcomers, because despite the surface similarities between releases, Moore never seems to be going through the motions for the sake of further bulking up his already substantial catalog. His tough guitar lines remain biting yet classy, and his underappreciated voice is strong and convincing on originals and covers that nail all of the blues-rock bases without sounding rote. While there are no surprises here, Bad for You Baby is far from a disappointment. Moore continues a string of rugged, post-hard rock, power blues that he has carved his niche in since 1990's Still Got the Blues. He applies his throaty vocals and feral guitar to a pair of Muddy Waters tunes to impressive effect. No one will mistake his versions of Waters' "Walking Through the Park" or "Someday Baby" for the classic Chess era nuggets they are. Yet Moore's rocked up attack hits the mark for being relatively faithful to their melodies even as he wields his power blues sledgehammer. Moore boogies through J.B. Lenoir's "Mojo Boogie" like he invented the style, and even if his husky vocals will never be mistaken for Lenoir's reedy, high pitched singing, he tears into the tune with enough energy to shake up anything in the Johnny Winter songbook. Guitar shredders will thrill to the hot fret acrobatics of the double-time "Down the Line," and those who thought Led Zeppelin's first album was their finest hour should chow down on the hard rocking Jimmy Page-isms of "Umbrella Man." Moore writes one for the ladies on the sweet ballad "Holding On," which won't win any awards for lyrical complexity but boasts a lovely melody and Otis Taylor's daughter, Cassie, on backing vocals. Cassie returns with her dad (plucking nearly inaudible banjo) for the swamped up "Preacher Man Blues" that features some surprisingly effective harp from Moore, the only time he plays it on this disc. Al Kooper's slow, yearning "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know" from the New Yorker's Blood, Sweat & Tears stint is given an extended, nearly 11-minute treatment that's as compelling as BS&T's. Those hoping for Moore to expand his horizons will need to wait a little longer, but for existing followers and especially those new to his gutsy approach, Bad for You Baby more than fills the bill. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 1, 2008 | Mercury Studios

Since the early '90s Belfast guitar whiz Gary Moore has returned again and again to the blues, leaving his metal phase far behind. Old New Ballads Blues is exactly what the title says it is, a mix of old blues (covers of songs by Elmore James, Willie Dixon, and Otis Rush), new blues (five Moore originals), ballads (half the album) and, well, blues (by one definition or another, everything here passes for blues). The real surprise is that the strongest songs are the original Moore-penned ballads, as Moore gives powerful and atmospheric performances (both vocally and as a guitarist) on "Gonna Rain Today," "No Reason to Cry," and a solid horn-augmented remake of one of his best songs, "Midnight Blues," from what is easily his best album, 1990s million-selling Still Got the Blues. The James and Dixon covers ("Done Something Wrong" and "You Know My Love" respectively) seem disappointingly by-the-numbers, while the Rush song, "All Your Love," fares a bit better, but Moore's own compositions shine brightest here, giving him plenty of room to weep on the old Les Paul, which is a very good thing, since vocals have never been Moore's strongest suit and his lyrics are often on the slight side. All of that vanishes when his guitar takes over a song, and on the instrumental "Cut It Out," Moore's muscular guitar tone says as much or more about life inside the blues as any of the vocal numbers. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 30, 1980 | Sanctuary Records

After cooperating with Phil Lynott on Back on the Streets, Gary Moore moved to L.A. and formed the group G-Force with Willie Dee, Tony Newton, and drummer Mark Nauseef. The group did not hold together much longer than it took to finish the first album, and on its re-release on CD, only Moore gets credit. But the album they left behind, also named G-Force, is clearly underrated. As expected, it does contain the elements that would later make Moore famous, like hard rock riffs and long instrumental solos. Looking for this, listen to "White Knuckles/Rockin' and Rollin'," which would stay in his repertoire for a long time. But the album also shows a side later hardly seen. "Hot Gossip" and "The Woman's in Love" are catchy pop tunes that, except for the guitars, have more in common with Elvis Costello than with Moore's coming albums, or with the weird boogie rock of Grinding Stone. These tracks could appeal to a pop audience if they would ever find them, which is unlikely. And surprisingly, these are two of the tracks written exclusively by Moore. Yes, one can suspect that some of the humor of the quirky choruses is unintentional, but the timing is perfect. But if underrated, the album still holds problems for the buyer. Except for the apparent difficulty of appealing to two different audiences, the album also contains a few tracks ranking among Moore's worst. So despite a number of great songs, G-Force is probably best bought by listeners who want to find a few unexpected gems. It may contain too few true Gary Moore songs for rock fans and too many guitar solos for pop fans. In 1990 the album was re-released on CD by Castle Communications. © Lars Lovén /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1990 | Sanctuary Records

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Metal - Released January 1, 1997 | Virgin Records

By the late '90s, guitarist Gary Moore was at a career crossroads. Should he continue on the path that brought him his biggest stateside success (Still Got the Blues), or try something a bit contemporary? The ex-Thin Lizzy member decided on the latter, issuing Dark Days in Paradise, an album that saw Moore utilize electronic beats and, of course, his trademark soaring guitar work, rather than blues-rockers. And you have to give the guitarist credit -- he does venture outside of what you'd usually expect from a new Moore album, whether it be the Beatlesque "One Fine Day" (which contains a bassline quite similar to the Fab Four's "Rain") or the keyboard-heavy ballad "Like Angels" (which sounds like it's straight from 1987). While fans of Victims of the Future may be left wondering where the hard rock went, Dark Days in Paradise will be an interesting listen for fans curious to hear Moore trying new approaches. [Originally released in 1997, Dark Days in Paradise was reissued by Virgin in 2003 with three bonus tracks: "Burning in Our Hearts," "There Must Be a Way," and the title track.] © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 27, 1999 | Sanctuary Records

All credit to Gary Moore for having the courage to leap into the relative unknown with A DIFFERENT BEAT. It is indeed greatly removed from anything he had released prior to 1999. Perhaps it was the new-found freedom from the guitarist's contract with Virgin that fuelled the change of direction--that and Moore's obvious affinity with outfits along the lines of Apollo 440 and Fatboy Slim (to whom "Fatboy" is a tribute). There's still opportunity for some trademark axe solos, thankfully, and hearing Moore's fretwork gymnastics over contemporary dance beats is a totally unique experience. Most impressive are "Lost in Your Love," given an impassioned vocal and instrumental performance, and the blissed-out "Surrender," the other end of the emotional scale entirely. "Bring My Baby Back," meanwhile is a marvellous pictorial description of a jilted lover's impending train ride to attempt a rescue of his former love. Moore and his production team serve up a pleasing array of dance beats, spiced up with inimitable melodies. A Phat Lizzy, perhaps?! © TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Mercury Studios

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Mercury Studios

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Rock - Released January 1, 2009 | Mercury Studios