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Blues - Released November 24, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

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Rock - Released September 10, 2002 | Sanctuary Records

After spending over a decade churning out electrified blues, Gary Moore partially returns to his hard rock beginnings in Scars. Reminiscent of '60s power trios such as Cream and especially the Jimi Hendrix Experience ("World of Confusion" is practically a rewrite of "Manic Depression" and "Ball and Chain" borrows the riff from "Voodoo Child"), Moore hasn't abandoned the blues, he's just pumped it up with blustery retro roots rock. With all the genre's limitations, the guitarist is so obviously inspired in this format that the album is a success on its own terms, even though it breaks little new ground. "Wasn't Born in Chicago" infuses jazzy drums and slight electronics to enhance the basic three-piece assault, resulting in the album's most unique and arguably best performance. Moore's pacing also helps as he softens his attack on ballads like "Just Can't Let You Go" and the closing "Who Knows (What Tomorrow May Bring)?" He effectively shifts from tender to tense to explosive in seconds and, even on the nearly 13-minute "Ball and Chain," keeps the listener involved through a combination of six-string talent, full-bodied vocals, and a sense of dynamics. Occupying a well-worn space with a potent fusion of blues power and hard rock, Scars shows Gary Moore comfortable in his skin. It's a rugged if not terribly original fusion that succeeds due to his talent, enthusiasm, and no-frills approach. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 21, 1983 | Sanctuary Records

Although he'd probably beg to disagree, Gary Moore's worst enemy throughout his career has arguably been his own eclecticism; a distinct lack of focus which has regularly seen him swinging back and forth between the roles of heavy metal guitar hero and blues purist (and everything in between: Irish folk music, jazz fusion, you name it). And while the second half of his career saw him capable of focusing on both the blues and hard rock/metal with some consistency, 1984's Dirty Fingers is very much a document of those early, restless years. Originally recorded in 1980 but shelved in deference to the far more radio-oriented material released in its stead as the one-off G Force album that same year (yes, another detour by Moore), Dirty Fingers' tracks are generally characterized by a raw, uncompromising heavy rock aesthetic -- hence the title. As such, tough, virile rockers invariably slathered in frenetic six-string fretwork abound (see "Hiroshima," "Kidnapped" "Lonely Night") but, with the exception of the unapologetically nasty "Run to Your Mama," these tend to fall well short of the material heard on 1979's Back on the Streets and its "official" successor, Corridors of Power, three years later. A cover of the Animals' "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" is similarly lackluster; "Rest in Peace" is just another example of Moore's typically bland '80s balladry; "Really Gonna Rock" sounds like an early version of "Rockin' Every Night"; and the one-minute title track is merely a sketch for the electrifying solo later used to introduce Corridors of Power's epic "End of the World" (for which this album's "Bad News" was partly cannibalized, as well). But there is at least one other career highlight to be found on Dirty Fingers, and that's the bombastic "Nuclear Attack" (yet another of Moore's apocalyptic warnings), which, amid massive riffs that keep it rocking like a motherf**ker, unveils a simple but effective counterpoint synthesizer theme that one could very well assume inspired Europe to write "The Final Countdown." Also know that most of the above find Moore sharing lead vocals with former Ted Nugent singer Charlie Huhn for the first and final time, and you'll have all you need to know about Dirty Fingers -- an interesting but not essential Gary Moore album. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 30, 2003 | Sanctuary Records

Power guitarist Gary Moore's Live at Monsters of Rock is a dream come true for every guitar freak out there. Teamed with his trio of Cass Lewis and Darrin Mooney, Moore turns it up to 14 and powers his way through razored, crunching covers of the Yardbirds' "Shapes of Things" and Free's "Wishing Well" before delving into his own rather voluminous catalog. Performances of the riff-laden "Rectify," the bluesed-out "Stand Up," and the completely adrenaline-fueled metal of "Out in the Fields" take this over the top. But the final track, a deeply moving version of "Pariesienne Walkways," is a fitting tribute to the tune's original vocalist and former Thin Lizzy bandmate Phil Lynott. There is nothing but pure power here -- no restraint, no mixing, no overdubs, nothing but pure Monsters of Rock power. This is the guitar record Moore had been promising his entire career. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 30, 1980 | Sanctuary Records

After cooperating with Phil Lynott on Back on the Streets, Gary Moore moved to L.A. and formed the group G-Force with Willie Dee, Tony Newton, and drummer Mark Nauseef. The group did not hold together much longer than it took to finish the first album, and on its re-release on CD, only Moore gets credit. But the album they left behind, also named G-Force, is clearly underrated. As expected, it does contain the elements that would later make Moore famous, like hard rock riffs and long instrumental solos. Looking for this, listen to "White Knuckles/Rockin' and Rollin'," which would stay in his repertoire for a long time. But the album also shows a side later hardly seen. "Hot Gossip" and "The Woman's in Love" are catchy pop tunes that, except for the guitars, have more in common with Elvis Costello than with Moore's coming albums, or with the weird boogie rock of Grinding Stone. These tracks could appeal to a pop audience if they would ever find them, which is unlikely. And surprisingly, these are two of the tracks written exclusively by Moore. Yes, one can suspect that some of the humor of the quirky choruses is unintentional, but the timing is perfect. But if underrated, the album still holds problems for the buyer. Except for the apparent difficulty of appealing to two different audiences, the album also contains a few tracks ranking among Moore's worst. So despite a number of great songs, G-Force is probably best bought by listeners who want to find a few unexpected gems. It may contain too few true Gary Moore songs for rock fans and too many guitar solos for pop fans. In 1990 the album was re-released on CD by Castle Communications. © Lars Lovén /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1990 | Sanctuary Records

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Rock - Released September 27, 1999 | Sanctuary Records

All credit to Gary Moore for having the courage to leap into the relative unknown with A DIFFERENT BEAT. It is indeed greatly removed from anything he had released prior to 1999. Perhaps it was the new-found freedom from the guitarist's contract with Virgin that fuelled the change of direction--that and Moore's obvious affinity with outfits along the lines of Apollo 440 and Fatboy Slim (to whom "Fatboy" is a tribute). There's still opportunity for some trademark axe solos, thankfully, and hearing Moore's fretwork gymnastics over contemporary dance beats is a totally unique experience. Most impressive are "Lost in Your Love," given an impassioned vocal and instrumental performance, and the blissed-out "Surrender," the other end of the emotional scale entirely. "Bring My Baby Back," meanwhile is a marvellous pictorial description of a jilted lover's impending train ride to attempt a rescue of his former love. Moore and his production team serve up a pleasing array of dance beats, spiced up with inimitable melodies. A Phat Lizzy, perhaps?! © TiVo
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Rock - Released September 21, 1983 | Sanctuary Records

This live album, recorded circa 1980 at London's Marquee Club, is a mixed bag, featuring material from Gary Moore's 1979 solo album Back on the Streets and his band project G Force. Most impressive, perhaps, is the incredible musicianship in this performance from Moore and drummer Tommy Aldridge. Besides rocking out with "Back on the Streets" and "Run to Your Mama," the band locks into a great groove on "She's Got You." But they reach an absolute peak with a beautiful rendition of Moore's first U.K. hit, the instrumental ballad "Parisienne Walkways," a melody so lovely that Moore plagiarized himself 12 years later, tweaking it only slightly to create his hit "Still Got the Blues." © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Blues - Released November 24, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

Blues and Beyond is a compilation box set assembling various recordings from legendary Northern Irish singer/songwriter and blues guitarist Gary Moore. The collection features previously unheard material as well as live renditions of the hits "Still Got the Blues" and "Parisienne Walkways." I Can't Wait Until Tomorrow, an authorized biography written by music journalist Harry Shapiro, is also included. © Rob Wacey /TiVo