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Jazz - Released October 13, 1955 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released April 17, 2020 | Mack Avenue Records

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Part of Mack Avenue’s wonderful Octave Remastered series, Gemini allows us to rediscover Erroll Garner in the last years of his life. Originally released in 1972, this groovy album was created along with double bassist Ernest McCarty Jr., conga player Jose Mangual and drummer Jimmie Smith. Supported by the omnipresent rhythm section, Garner plays not only piano but harpsichord too, revisiting standards such as How High the Moon, Tea for Two and These Foolish Things. The pianist also tackles more contemporary compositions, such as The Beatles’ Something. Like always, his unstoppable swing (one of the most recognizable in the history of jazz) radiates through this brilliant, multifaceted re-release. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released May 15, 2020 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz - Released February 14, 2020 | Mack Avenue Records

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The Erroll Garner Octave Remastered series from Mack Avenue continues its insanely dedicated remastering project with Up in Erroll’s Room, created from intense sessions in November 1967 and that were published the following year. This eighth volume is particular as you can hear Garner’s entourage – Ike Isaacs on double bass, Jimmie Smith on drums and José Mangual on the congas – with a brass section conducted by Don Sebesky, using arrangements improvised by the master. Richard Spencer is also present conducting The Brass Bed, a great group of brass instrumentalists that includes saxophonist Pepper Adams, trumpeter Bernie Glow and tuba player Don Butterfield. These collaborations amplify the musicality of the themes that are played, resounding like dynamic punctuation that is often welcome. As always, Erroll Garner reappropriates classics like Herbie Hancock’s Watermelon Man, Antonio Carlos Jobim’s The Girl from Ipanema and Gershwin’s I Got Rhythm, imprinting his own playing techniques and unbeatable swing upon some of the most recognisable jazz pieces in the world. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released September 27, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released January 11, 2011 | SendDigital

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

It was a typical recording session for pianist Erroll Garner. With his regular trio of the period (bassist Wyatt Ruther and drummer Fats Heard) plus Candido, Garner recorded 24 songs (all first takes) on July 27, 1954. 13 of the pieces are on this 1998 CD reissue, including the earliest recorded version of his big hit "Misty." Other highlights include "I've Got the World on a String," a lengthy "7-11 Jump," "There's a Small Hotel" and "I've Got to Be a Rugcutter." Erroll Garner never recorded an uninspired solo, and this CD is as good a place as any to explore his joyful music. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released September 30, 2016 | Octave Music Licensing, LLC

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Jazz - Released June 12, 2020 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz - Released March 20, 2020 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz - Released September 27, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released April 9, 1987 | Columbia

Concert by the Sea is certainly one of the biggest albums in jazz history, selling over 225,000 copies in the first year after its 1956 release and turning into such a steady seller over the next few years, it reportedly brought Columbia Records a million dollars by 1958 -- a nice sum at any time but astronomical in the late '50s. It should've turned Erroll Garner into a full-fledged superstar and, in a way, it did, because it was a reliable catalog item and earned him plenty of fans, including Johnny Carson, who frequently invited the pianist onto The Tonight Show. Instead, Concert by the Sea turned into a pinnacle, with Garner and manager Martha Glaser sliding into contractual battles with Columbia that hampered his long-term growth. Glaser is the one who had the idea to turn the tapes of Garner's September 19, 1955 concert at the Sunset School in Carmel-by-the-Sea, California into a full-fledged album, taking tapes that may have otherwise wound up as a bootleg and turning them over to Columbia. The label whittled the 19-song concert into an 11-track single LP -- Columbia/Legacy's 2015 The Complete Concert by the Sea restores the entirety of the concert over the course of two CDs, adding the original LP as a third -- and, by doing so, they wound up distilling Garner's joyous appeal. Supported by bassist Eddie Calhoun and drummer Denzil Best, Garner seems at home skipping and swinging through a collection of bop and big-band standards, tunes that offer showcases for his sly skill of remaining melodic even when departing from the melody. Garner's playing is so robust and easy to enjoy that his flashier flourishes, such as the cloistered chords that call up "Caravan," almost seem camouflaged, but there are also subtler signatures, like how he slyly emphasizes staccato left-hand rhythms as much as the melody on "They Can't Take That Away from Me." These are distinctions that appear on close listening but the wonderful thing about Concert by the Sea is how it's so infectious and open-hearted, it almost defies inspection: it's the kind of warm, inviting music that seems born from joy and can't help but engender bliss in the listener. [The 2015 expansion offers simply more of a good thing: the rest of the concert is every bit as good as the selections that made the official LP.] © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 13, 2018 | Mack Avenue Records

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With the help of the label Mack Avenue, Octave Music pursues its publishing of brand new or rare recordings from Erroll Garner, with this time a live at the Royal Concertgebouw in Amsterdam on November 7, 1964 called Nightconcert. Helped by Eddie Calhoun’s double bass and Kelly Martin’s drums, the pianists covers here gems drawn from the Great American Songbook. We may have heard a thousand times Over the Rainbow, Night And Day, My Funny Valentine, On Green Dolphin Street or Laura, we definitely enjoy them once again thanks to this jazz whose swing has been magnified. And as always with Garner, offering such a wide palette of colors with only three people is nothing short of a miracle. We go from a chamber intimacy to virtuoso fireworks, from stripped-down subtleties to rhythmic uppercuts. At the heart of this voluble and infectious swing, Garner fans will be happy to find here the rare That Amsterdam Swing… After The Complete Concert by the Sea in 2015 and Ready Take One in 2016, this is a third unmissable archive. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 17, 2020 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz - Released October 18, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz - Released September 27, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

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Jazz - Released November 15, 2019 | Mack Avenue Records

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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released March 22, 1991 | Columbia

As was the case with Fats Waller, Erroll Garner's natural and advanced musical talent ingratiated him to jazz aficionados and experts alike. Garner took to the piano intuitively, never needing to take lessons because of his exceptional ear for music. Further breaking the mold, he transcended many of the jazz styles he came up with, including both swing and bebop. You hear the power of swing pianist Earl Hines in his fleet and robust approach, and, yes, he once played with Charlie Parker, but as heard on this Columbia collection from 1951-1952, Garner concocts a unique blend of the big band's svelte rhythms and bebop's heady swing. On the 20 gems found on Body and Soul, Garner employs a rush of dynamics, yet never compromises the inherent lyricism of the set's many standards. This balancing act cuts across a varied set of brisk swingers (Waller's "Honeysuckle Rose"), fine ballads ("I Can't Get Started"), and medium-tempo strollers ("It's the Talk of the Town"). In light of Garner's thoroughly engaging and self-contained work at the piano, even the fact that bassist John Simmons and drummer Shadow Wilson are practically inaudible becomes negligible. Garner bolsters many of these "little symphonies" with clever intros: a miniature recasting of the song's chord and harmonic structure, heard to sublime effect here on "Summertime" and "Body and Soul" (Garner would expand these preambles in the future, particularly on solo piano outings). And in response to criticisms of his playing being too ornate (extra tremolo on the ballads), it should be said that part of Garner's charm is his "old-fashioned" phrasing, part of the romantic and urbane touch he employs to keep said indulgences in check most of the time. Body and Soul is a fine collection of early Garner sides. Highly recommended. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released September 10, 1987 | Columbia

These sides from 1950-51 were the first Garner recorded for Columbia, and like the later Body And Soul reissue from the same label, this disc includes a sophisticated and highly enjoyable program of classic standards. In his inimitable keyboard style -­ a seamless mixture of swing's bounce, pianist Art Tatum's mammoth facility, and some of bebop's mercurial twists -­ Garner glides through fine ballad readings of "Spring Is Here" and "Long Ago and Far Away," as well as compact, medium to fast tempo swingers like "When You're Smiling" and "Lover." Garner's burgeoning knack for abstract song preludes are plentiful too, with his two minute (half the song's length) impressionistic reworking of the chords to "My Heart Stood Still" standing out in particular. Extending the process further, Garner plays cat and mouse with the chords over the entirety of both "It Could Happen to You" and "Laura," creating spectral -- some might say overly florid -- interpretations in the process. The pianist's soft, almost strumming touch endeared him to a millions of fans in the late '40s and early '50s, and made the complex improvisational embellishments almost seem like part of the original composition. A great disc for newcomers and fans alike ­- nicely remastered, too. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Verve

Another in a long line of fine Jazz 'Round Midnight collections from Verve, this Erroll Garner installment finds the pianist on a fine set of both trio sides and solo pieces. And if a jazz figure was ever tailor-made for this ballad-heavy series, then it's the dulcet-fingered Garner. This is especially true on such album highlights as "Don't Blame Me" and the extended solo rendition of "Over the Rainbow." Hit-loving fans need not worry, though, since Garner's perennial "Misty" also shows up. A fine start for the curious listener. © Stephen Cook /TiVo