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Jazz - Released January 2, 1999 | ENJA RECORDS Matthias Winckelmann

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
One of the busiest and most dependable musicians of the '90s, pianist Fred Hersch delivers another strong performance with Point in Time, mixing standards, choice jazz classics, and his own creative originals. His trio with bassist Drew Gress and drummer Tom Rainey is featured on four tracks; highlights include his moving rendition of "The Peacocks" and a driving original, "Cat's Paws," dedicated to the late promising pianist Dave Catney who died a few months before these sessions. Tenor saxophonist Rich Perry is featured on the delicate arrangement of "Infant Eyes," while trumpeter Dave Douglas joins Hersch on the pianist's melancholy but insistent "Too Soon." The full quintet is featured on several songs, including the pianist's pulsating post bop title track as well as on "Evidence," which captures the playfulness of its composer, Thelonious Monk. Recommended. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 13, 1998 | Nonesuch

Pianist Fred Hersch has a very different style than Thelonious Monk did, and on this solo tribute CD, he does not attempt to closely emulate Monk. Hersch does hint at Thelonious in spots on the 13 Monk compositions, but mostly performs in a sparse, melodic and quietly playful manner. His interpretations of such songs as "In Walked Bud," "Ask Me Now," "Let's Cool One" and "Misterioso" (which he calls "Five Views of Misterioso") are tasteful yet full of subtle invention. A pleasing and respectful effort. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 19, 1996 | Nonesuch

"A gifted pianist of the Bill Evans school, Fred Hersch composed and arranged this voluptuous collection of music by Duke Ellington's creative alter ego..." © TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 14, 1999 | Nonesuch

Fred Hersch is a well-respected session pianist and bandleader who has taught at the New School and is currently on the faculty of the New England Conservatory in Boston. This disc documents a faculty recital he played in October of 1998, a concert that was never intended to be released commercially. But Hersch, who hadn't played a full concert in public for over six months before his recital at Jordan Hall, was so pleased with this performance that he agreed to allow Nonesuch to issue it on CD. He was right. The program opens with a gently stunning rendition of the folk song "Black Is the Color of My True Love's Hair," which then segues into the love theme from Spartacus, a tune generally associated with the late Bill Evans, and one which Hersch plays with an impressionistic delicacy that harks back explicitly to Evans. There are other standards, including the Gershwin classic "I Loves You Porgy" and Hoagy Carmichael's "The Nearness of You," as well as a rather meditative rendition of Thelonious Monk's "Blue Monk," on which Hersch uses open chords in manner that evokes the Balkan modalisms of Bartok. One of the more touching performances here is his piano arrangement of the Joni Mitchell song "My Old Man." Everything is played with virtuosic flair, but Hersch never shows off his technique or lapses into noodling self-indulgence. The result is a solo album of rare insight and musicality. Highly recommended. © Rick Anderson /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 31, 1994 | Concord Jazz

Fred Hersch's first solo recital came about thanks to -- what else? -- the Maybeck Recital Hall series, which devotes Vol. 31 to his survey of several well-worn pop standards, a few jazz tunes, and a couple of originals. Luckily, Hersch likes to use a percussive form of counterpoint often enough to juice things up, a plan that launches "The Song Is You" and "Everything I Love" in unorthodox fashion. "In Walked Bud," an inventive takeoff on Monk's own stabbing manner, is also clever in its spiky, asymmetrical way. The opening and ending of "Haunted Heart" work well with a nostalgic drone in the bass, and Ornette Coleman's "Ramblin'" gets a gospel-influenced workout that fans of Keith Jarrett's early solo concerts would appreciate. As for the two Hersch originals, "Heartsong" is ebullient and romantic at the same time, while "Sarabande" concentrates solely upon lyricism. In other words, another classy, technically unimpeachable, spotlessly recorded outing in the Maybeck series. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Jazz - Released August 16, 1996 | Nonesuch - Warner Records

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Jazz - Released May 1, 2001 | Jazzen Records