Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released November 7, 2014 | Palmetto Records

From
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released October 30, 2015 | Palmetto Records

From
CD$6.99

Jazz - Released September 4, 2015 | Palmetto Records

From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released May 14, 1999 | Nonesuch

Fred Hersch is a well-respected session pianist and bandleader who has taught at the New School and is currently on the faculty of the New England Conservatory in Boston. This disc documents a faculty recital he played in October of 1998, a concert that was never intended to be released commercially. But Hersch, who hadn't played a full concert in public for over six months before his recital at Jordan Hall, was so pleased with this performance that he agreed to allow Nonesuch to issue it on CD. He was right. The program opens with a gently stunning rendition of the folk song "Black Is the Color of My True Love's Hair," which then segues into the love theme from Spartacus, a tune generally associated with the late Bill Evans, and one which Hersch plays with an impressionistic delicacy that harks back explicitly to Evans. There are other standards, including the Gershwin classic "I Loves You Porgy" and Hoagy Carmichael's "The Nearness of You," as well as a rather meditative rendition of Thelonious Monk's "Blue Monk," on which Hersch uses open chords in manner that evokes the Balkan modalisms of Bartok. One of the more touching performances here is his piano arrangement of the Joni Mitchell song "My Old Man." Everything is played with virtuosic flair, but Hersch never shows off his technique or lapses into noodling self-indulgence. The result is a solo album of rare insight and musicality. Highly recommended. © Rick Anderson /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released March 31, 1994 | Concord Jazz

Fred Hersch's first solo recital came about thanks to -- what else? -- the Maybeck Recital Hall series, which devotes Vol. 31 to his survey of several well-worn pop standards, a few jazz tunes, and a couple of originals. Luckily, Hersch likes to use a percussive form of counterpoint often enough to juice things up, a plan that launches "The Song Is You" and "Everything I Love" in unorthodox fashion. "In Walked Bud," an inventive takeoff on Monk's own stabbing manner, is also clever in its spiky, asymmetrical way. The opening and ending of "Haunted Heart" work well with a nostalgic drone in the bass, and Ornette Coleman's "Ramblin'" gets a gospel-influenced workout that fans of Keith Jarrett's early solo concerts would appreciate. As for the two Hersch originals, "Heartsong" is ebullient and romantic at the same time, while "Sarabande" concentrates solely upon lyricism. In other words, another classy, technically unimpeachable, spotlessly recorded outing in the Maybeck series. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
From
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released July 1, 1995 | Jazzen Records

From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released August 16, 1996 | Nonesuch - Warner Records

From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released October 30, 2015 | Palmetto Records

From
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released November 7, 2014 | Palmetto Records

From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released April 24, 2020 | Palmetto+

Hi-Res
From
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released November 29, 2016 | VSOP Records

From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released March 6, 2020 | Palmetto+

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released April 26, 2019 | Palmetto+

Hi-Res
From
CD$8.99

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released March 1, 2016 | MAXJAZZ

From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released April 3, 2020 | Palmetto+

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released October 30, 2015 | Palmetto Records

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released October 30, 2015 | Palmetto Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | GM Recordings

From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released April 1, 2019 | Palmetto+

Hi-Res
From
CD$7.99

Jazz - Released April 21, 2009 | Sunnyside

Ever the restless artist, pianist Fred Hersch wastes no time moving from one project to another. But he's termed this one "unintentional", having played with his "Pocket Orchestra" (in reality a quartet) only one other time, and that was the evening prior to these recordings at Jazz Standard in New York City. Stripping down the ensemble to barebones with no bassist, Hersch is joined by veteran drummer Richie Barshay, the excellent trumpeter Ralph Alessi, and Australian vocalist Jo Lawry. The music sports ethereal, wistful qualities at times, and in other instances, playful, prosaic, ethnic, and curious ones. Ever mindful of the deeper spirit of the heart, Hersch is consistently able to excavate deep emotions from the wellspring of timeless beauty, ancient traditions, and always the true spirit of modern jazz. "Stuttering" kicks off the set, and it's one of those irresistible pieces that commands your attention from the first note to the last, with its mixed meter navigation based in 3/4 time, unison piano, muted trumpet, and vocal lines, a daunting swing, the complex made simple, and adding a smidgen of funk. Hersch's famous "Song Without Words" is a samba with spiritual implications, Alessi's bright trumpet identifies the bluesy da-da song "Down Home," and an Afro-Cuban bounce tacked onto a New Orleans shuffle with Lawry and Hersch's quick, maximized staccato phrases enhances "Free Flying." Norma Winstone's lyrics are soulfully sung by Lawry in the innocent, breathless, light hearted way they were written on the waltz swing ballad "Invitation to the Dance" and the unrequited, sweet, Valentine's Day invitation "A Wish." Lawry sings and recites M.J. Salter's "what did you think?" poem; "Light Years," uses wordless scat on the fun and impish tune "Lee's Dream," one Bill Evans would enjoy; la-la's along during the more ECM like, Native American elements of "Child's Song," and hums in reserved, reverent repast aside Hersch for the Spanish tinged paean/prayer "Canzona." Each piece uniquely tells its own story, with Alessi's constantly inventive and listenable horn positively influencing the sound of Hersch's wise and wary piano stylings. Another successful project in a long line of them, it is a very fine example of how Hersch continually expands his horizons beyond standard fare and tradition, making his own history with every unique idea he is still capable of fathoming after all these years. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo