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Rock - Released August 14, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released August 14, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
$12.99

Rock - Released August 14, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
In his contract with Ryko, Frank Zappa had to put together 12 CDs worth of live material for the series You Can't Do That on Stage Anymore. The fact that he decided to devote two of them (all of Vol. 2) to a Helsinki concert from 1974 illustrates how good and representative he thought it was -- and he was right. This two-CD set features the 1973-1974 band (Napoleon Murphy Brock, George Duke, Ruth Underwood, Tom Fowler, Chester Thompson) near the end of their tour, in a concert in faraway Finland on September 22, 1974 (there were actually two concerts performed that day and, as usual, Zappa edited the best moments together). The set list comes mostly from the Roxy & Elsewhere repertoire, except that here the songs are taken at a faster tempo and free of the overdubs found on the original album. "Echidna's Arf (Of You)" and "Don't You Ever Wash That Thing?" are very exciting, but without the vocal overdubs "Cheepnis" feels empty. But the treats lie elsewhere, as in the playful "Inca Roads" (Zappa used the guitar solo from this concert for the One Size Fits All version); "RDNZL," still a work-in-progress at the time; the unreleased "Approximate" (including hilarious stage craziness); and "T'Mershi Duween." The band is in great shape, Zappa being particularly witty and good-humored. When a member of the audience requests the Allman Brothers song "Whipping Post," he spontaneously rewrites the lyrics to "Montana" -- and backup vocalists Brock and Duke have to adapt! For fans of the man's complex, progressive rock-tinged music of the mid-'70s, this is a must-have, even though it also contains very average moments ("Dupree's Paradise," for instance). Sound quality is very good, superior to any bootleg from this period. ~ François Couture
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Rock - Released February 2, 2018 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
In forty-four years, this isn’t the first time that the recordings from December 8, 9 and 10, 1973 at the Roxy Theatre in Hollywood have been released one some form or another. First, there was the double album Roxy & Elsewhere in 1974, then Roxy by Proxy in 2014, Roxy the Soundtrack in 2015, and finally this The Roxy Performances which covers the entirety of the four concerts, as well as the filmed rehearsals from December 8 and 10, not forgetting a preparatory session of the Apostrophe (') album in Ike Turner’s Bolic Studios, on December 12th. Is it really useful to remind you that Roxy & Elsewhere is one of the finest in history, all genres included? Consequently, we were entitled to wonder if bringing back what was sidelined by Zappa himself was worth it. Aside from Zappa’s biggest fans, would the average person appreciate for what it’s worth five versions of Pygmy Twylyte, of which one lasts almost 25 minutes (split into two parts), or four variations of Penguin in Bondage or Uncle Meat? More than ever, we’ll remind you one of the golden rules to apply to Zappa more than to any other form of music: you have to have your mind open as much as your ears and let yourself get carried away. You’ll surprise yourself by starting listening to this copious compilation of 84 tracks (Zappa’s monologues included)—that is to say almost eight hours—telling yourself that you’ll only do three or four extracts before moving on to something else, to finally discover that Zappa’s magic is such that you’ll have the greatest difficulty letting go of it. The master’s excellence and one of the best Mothers formations reach such heights that you’ll have difficulties finding any redundancies here. If we had to keep only one significant example, it would probably be Don't You Ever Wash that Thing?, whose different versions wonderfully demonstrate the perfect blend of high skills and collectedness which keep the music from ever getting dull or monotonous. At most, you might switch off a bit during Be-bop Tango (Of the Old Jazzmen’s Church), where the interaction with the audience lasts a bit too long, even if the many musical gags are worth the detour. But you’ll be tempted more than once to take on more lessons with Professor Zappa, especially in the studio section, in which he leads his Mothers with as much firmness as dexterity. Finally, it wouldn’t be superfluous to insist on the exceptional sound take of these “performances”. Planned at first for a quadriphonic version, these recordings have been particularly polished, just like their transition to digital. ©JPS/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released March 29, 2019 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released August 14, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
$102.49

Rock - Released October 20, 2017 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
Each year, fans of Frank Zappa didn’t celebrate Halloween like any other Americans. No. Before passing away at only 52 on December 4, 1993, their idol had developed the habit of offering relentless marathon concerts. First scheduled in Passaic, New Jersey then in Chicago, they took place in New York starting from 1974. From 28th to 31st October, 1977, in the Palladium hall, Zappa and his wacky band gave six concerts that have made history. Everything has of course be recorded and four of these shows have even been filmed (Baby Snakes). To celebrate the fortieth birthday of this great event unlike any other, the entirety of this party has finally been published. 158 remastered tracks, and more than 15 hours of music! Alongside Zappa, the faithful Terry Bozzio (drums), Tommy Mars and Peter Wolf (keyboards), Adrian Belew (guitar), Ed Mann (percussion) and Patrick O’Hearn (bass) are there to cover an almost eleven-year career and dig in albums as emblematic as Hot Rats, Over-Nite Sensation, Bongo Fury, One Size Fits All or even Zoot Allures. © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released August 14, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
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Rock - Released November 4, 2016 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released August 14, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Frank Zappa Catalog

This two-CD set is the second of three albums of material Frank Zappa compiled from the 1988 tour. While Broadway the Hard Way (released in 1988) mostly presented the new songs performed during that tour, this set focuses on older songs (Make a Jazz Noise Here would contain mostly instrumental pieces). This is the best band you never heard in your life because the 12-piece group disintegrated after only four months of touring through the U.S. East Coast and Europe. These shows took place during the Jimmy Swaggart scandal, when the televangelist was caught with a prostitute. Thus, many of the songs' lyrics were rewritten to refer to this situation (the whole 1988 tour was strongly anti-preacher oriented). There are a lot of strong performances of old favorites and obscurities, all rearranged to include the horn section, and a few improbable covers. Highlights include Johnny Cash's "Ring of Fire" (hilarious), the unexpected "Who Needs the Peace Corps?," "Mr. Green Genes," and "The Eric Dolphy Memorial Barbecue," and an extended rendition of "The Torture Never Stops" that includes the theme from the TV show Bonanza and a Swaggart version of "Lonesome Cowboy Burt." To top it all off, the group performs a very entertaining reggae version of Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven." This band was incredibly talented and professional, and the selection of songs spans Zappa's entire career. In short, this is one of the man's best live albums. ~ François Couture