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Electronic/Dance - Released November 15, 2010 | InFiné

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"IDIOSYNKRASIA retains the sharp darkness of where techno essentially resides -- inside a hefty club soundsystem -- and Tristano uses his piano to fill the areas between electronic pulses with light and shade."
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Concertos - Released January 1, 2006 | PentaTone

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Classical - Released May 3, 2019 | Sony Classical

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The brilliantly inventive Francesco Tristano Schlimé is having fun with these Tokyo Stories. The Luxembourgish pianist’s numerous references shine through with primed balance, as if rejuvenated by the artist’s mastery of multi-style collages. While very contrasting, each title flows naturally to the next. Although a minimalist, almost repetitive style is used to full effect, it never hampers the very clear desire to constantly renew rhythms, like in Insomnia, or Electric Mirror that becomes a beautiful tribute to Johann Sebastian Bach, one of Francesco Tristano Schlimé’s idols. The more fragmented style of Pakuchi, with its overlapping layers and light jazz rhythms, appears to veer towards territories of contemporary creation rarely explored by “electro” artists. Tokyo Stories rarely explores – to our great delight – the spacey and meditative atmospheres so popular to the overwhelming neo-classic-pop piano scene. Only momentum and impetus matter here. A stellar album that truly highlights Francesco Tristano Schlimé’s multifaceted musicality at the highest level. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 8, 2017 | Sony Classical

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Unifying rather than choosing. Between his purely classical activities and his openly electro ones, Francesco Tristano Schlimé would rather not decide. For his first disc with Sony Classical, the Luxembourgish pianist and composer goes back to the solo piano. After a quick listen, we could easily place his Piano Circle Songs alongside the albums of Ludivico Einaudi, Olafur Arnalds, Nils Frahm and other Max Richter. But Francesco Tristano possesses a true musical personality. He has a relation to the music of Girolamo Frescobaldi and Carl Craig which has sculpted his musical personality. Here, the intimate and the personal are in command. The offered interlacing play as much upon the stripped-down than the repetitive. Upon the space and silence as well as the untold. The pianist avoids here the dead ends and vacuity. Recorded with a microphone put really close to the piano to pick up all the natural sounds from the instrument “as if your ear was in the piano”, this essay hosts, for four duets, another extraterrestrial pianist in the persona of Chilly Gonzales, a great magician of this type of musical miniatures… It’s a success, but above all, it’s another piece in the vast puzzle that is Francesco Tristano. © CM/Qobuz
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Electronic/Dance - Released February 12, 2007 | InFiné

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Classical - Released May 1, 2010 | CD Accord

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Classical - Released May 1, 2010 | CD Accord

A French review reprinted in the booklet for this live release notes that "Baroque purists would have found plenty of reasons to be up in arms" about the Bach performances by the Luxembourgeois pianist and conductor Francesco Tristano Schlimé recorded here. But anyone expecting an old-fashioned piano-and-orchestra Bach recording as still done by big-name pianists and symphony orchestras would be equally nonplussed. These recordings of Bach's keyboard concertos resemble none other that have ever been made, not even those of Glenn Gould, of whom Schlimé styles himself a disciple. They are, however, just about as startling as Gould's must have been in the 1950s, when they first began to appear. The most distinctive feature of Schlimé's readings is their jazz influence, manifested not so much in rhythmic alterations (which are present but extremely subtle) or improvisatory components (which are more pervasive but still do not call attention to themselves), but in the keyboard articulation, seemingly produced with relaxed, flat fingers in the manner of a jazz player. The music has something of the feel of the Bach recordings by John Lewis and the Modern Jazz Quartet, even though it is in no sense jazz. Schlimé expands on this idea with treatments that have a flexible, organic feel. He is aided by close coordination with his international group of handpicked New Bach Players, many of them his classmates at the Juilliard School in New York. Perhaps the pieces that work best are those in which Schlimé can use his unorthodox style to play with the balance between keyboard and orchestra; the Keyboard Concerto No. 7 in G minor, BWV 1058, with which Bach himself was apparently dissatisfied and which is often omitted from sets of this kind, or Keyboard Concerto No. 6 in F major, BWV 1057, in which the piano seems more comfortable taking over large stretches of the Brandenburg Concerto No. 4, BWV 1049 (most of these concertos are transcriptions). The entire relationship between the piano and orchestra is subtly altered in Schlimé's readings, in which the piano is much more prominent where it is simply playing the continuo part than a harpsichord would be; Schlimé here is again like the leader of a small jazz ensemble rather than a soloist set apart from a tutti. It's all quite a surprise, but it's well thought out in many details and is worth trying out if only for the shock of the new. The live recording at the superb Metz Arsenal is a strong point. Notes are in French, English, and Polish; this is a Polish release, with subsidies from various government and private sources.
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Miscellaneous - Released December 11, 2014 | Get Physical Music

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 14, 2011 | InFiné

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 10, 2008 | InFiné

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Classical - Released March 29, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released March 29, 2018 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released April 26, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released March 1, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 10, 2011 | InFiné

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House - Released April 22, 2016 | Get Physical Music

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Ambient - Released November 3, 2008 | InFiné

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Jazz - Released February 12, 2008 | Sunnyside

Don't let the title of Francesco Tristano's CD deceive you, for he plays acoustic piano on all the selections, enhanced by occasional ghostly electronic background trimmings. It is not necessarily a jazz piano recording, but one where he has paid attention to the minimalist 20th and 21st century players influenced by Steve Reich. Tristano's music is also keyed into techno (modifying a tune by Autechre) and alternative rock, some ethnic elements, and pure improvisational keyboard stylings. The introductory piece, "Hello," establishes the repeat-line concept with attributions, different accents and dynamics, bouncy and soulful components, and some improvisation. "Strings of Life," an adaptation of Detroit techno pioneer Derrick May's "Strings," exploits underground phantom effects in a two-chord development that builds momentum. A rumbling free improv discourse during "Ap" features a string of mini-arpeggios, while "The Melody" shows Tristano in joyous counterintuitive play. Three selections team Tristano with the brilliant Lebanese pianist Rami Khalife (his CD Scene from Hellek is a must-buy), and they display instant rapport. Tapping the pianos inside and out during "Jeita" to start, they move into a fractured theme and then a train trip with consistent forward motion. "The Bells" is closest to Steve Reich's concept -- slow, steady, then speeding within a controlled melodic framework -- while "Hymn" takes a dramatic and boisterous turn with a sense of purpose that speeds past the Reich visage. Tristano is in many ways a sensible and somewhat predictable player, but takes sufficient risks and uses shadings of gray and blue, a bit of Latin samba as on "Two Minds One Sound," and lighthearted romanticism or delicate simplicity offering diversity beyond strict minimalism. A most enjoyable and interesting project, it should please most progressive music listeners, and serve as a credible prelude to future works. ~ Michael G. Nastos

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Francesco Tristano Schlimé in the magazine
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