Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Lounge - Released September 6, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Soul/Funk/R&B - Released June 28, 2019 | Gingerbread Man Records

Hi-Res
The son of a traveling church minister, Northern Irish singer/songwriter Foy Vance spent the first five years of his life in the deep south, and he explores those roots on From Muscle Shoals. The first installment of a two-part dive into roots music, which also includes the Americana-leaning To Memphis, the ten-track set was recorded at the iconic FAME Studios in Alabama and features a seasoned crew of session players including original "Swampers" Spooner Oldham (keys) and David Hood (bass). Comprised of ten cuts, two of which ("Be with Me" and "Make It Rain") are punched-up versions of earlier works, Vance's 24-grit vocals and bluesy swagger go a long way in selling the material, as does the stellar musicianship of all involved, but in attempting to emulate a classic soul album, From Muscle Shoals -- a very on-the-nose name -- feels more like a facsimile. A workmanlike pastiche of well-oiled grooves, melodies, and lyrics that sound like they were run through a Stax Records song generator, Vance and company do their best to inject the proceedings with some zeal, but the shadows of Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, and Percy Sledge loom too large. Like Van Morrison, soul and R&B have always been at the forefront of Vance's particular brand of Irish-American folk, but From Muscle Shoals leans too hard in one direction and ultimately fails to distinguish itself from its source material. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 13, 2016 | Gingerbread Man Records - Elektra

Hi-Res
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released June 25, 2020 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
HI-RES$22.49
CD$14.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2014 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
CD$17.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 15, 2017 | Gingerbread Man Records

HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
Upon first listen, Joy of Nothing -- Irish singer/songwriter Foy Vance's second solo outing and first for Glassnote -- invokes names like Bruce Springsteen, Van Morrison, Cat Stevens, and Harry Chapin, and while the big, soulful AOR rock that's closely associated with those names indeed applies, there's an impassioned rawness at play here that suggests a steady diet of musical outliers like Jackie Leven, Robbie Robertson, Nicolai Dunger, and Richard Thompson. Steeped in the bold, big-sky expansiveness of the American Southwest, yet devoid of any of its machismo, Vance milks courage and strength from unflinching emotional honesty. Songs like the nervy "At Least My Heart Was Open," the bluesy, midtempo "Feel for Me," the arena-ready opener "Closed Hand, Full of Friends," and the gorgeous title cut, the latter of which posits "The joy of nothing is a sweeter something," are carried along by a refreshing sense of optimism, a word that is used quite infrequently when referring to records of the confessional singer/songwriter persuasion. Another plus is Vance's big, bluesy voice, which falls somewhere between the weathered midnight croon of Ray LaMontagne and the woodsy howl of John Fogerty, and it adds an air of rusty authenticity to measured country-folk confections like "Janey," "Regarding Your Lover," and the lush and languid midtempo closer, "Guiding Light," the latter of which features a guest vocal from Ed Sheeran. There's certainly nothing subtle about Joy of Nothing, as it's not afraid of making a grandiose statement, both musically and lyrically, but it never feels like Vance is putting on a front. After all, you can't play things close to the vest with your heart on your sleeve. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
HI-RES$4.49
CD$2.99

Pop - Released September 30, 2014 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 13, 2016 | Gingerbread Man Records - Elektra

HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Lounge - Released July 12, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
CD$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 8, 2017 | Atlantic Records UK

HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Lounge - Released May 24, 2019 | Gingerbread Man Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Lounge - Released August 23, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
CD$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released February 26, 2016 | Gingerbread Man Records - Elektra

HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Lounge - Released May 17, 2019 | Gingerbread Man Records

Hi-Res
CD$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 1, 2017 | Atlantic Records UK

Alternative & Indie - Released February 25, 2017 | Jam in the Van LLC

Download not available
HI-RES$1.99
CD$1.49

Lounge - Released June 14, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
HI-RES$1.49
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 10, 2015 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
HI-RES$1.49
CD$0.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
Upon first listen, Joy of Nothing -- Irish singer/songwriter Foy Vance's second solo outing and first for Glassnote -- invokes names like Bruce Springsteen, Van Morrison, Cat Stevens, and Harry Chapin, and while the big, soulful AOR rock that's closely associated with those names indeed applies, there's an impassioned rawness at play here that suggests a steady diet of musical outliers like Jackie Leven, Robbie Robertson, Nicolai Dunger, and Richard Thompson. Steeped in the bold, big-sky expansiveness of the American Southwest, yet devoid of any of its machismo, Vance milks courage and strength from unflinching emotional honesty. Songs like the nervy "At Least My Heart Was Open," the bluesy, midtempo "Feel for Me," the arena-ready opener "Closed Hand, Full of Friends," and the gorgeous title cut, the latter of which posits "The joy of nothing is a sweeter something," are carried along by a refreshing sense of optimism, a word that is used quite infrequently when referring to records of the confessional singer/songwriter persuasion. Another plus is Vance's big, bluesy voice, which falls somewhere between the weathered midnight croon of Ray LaMontagne and the woodsy howl of John Fogerty, and it adds an air of rusty authenticity to measured country-folk confections like "Janey," "Regarding Your Lover," and the lush and languid midtempo closer, "Guiding Light," the latter of which features a guest vocal from Ed Sheeran. There's certainly nothing subtle about Joy of Nothing, as it's not afraid of making a grandiose statement, both musically and lyrically, but it never feels like Vance is putting on a front. After all, you can't play things close to the vest with your heart on your sleeve. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo