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Alternative & Indie - Released January 31, 2013 | Warner Records

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
While there are lots of bands dealing in either danceable rock or navel-gazing pop, few bands combine the two quite like Foals. On Holy Fire, the third album from the English band, the post-punk revival is given a newfound sense of depth, creating songs that are rhythmic enough to draw listeners, but hypnotic enough to leave listeners lost in their wide-open spaces. This combination of atmosphere and momentum find Foals growing out of the shadows of titans like the Talking Heads and into a spaced-out, dance-punk niche that's all their own. Though a lot of the band's charm comes from the delicate interplay between the guitars and keyboards, the real star of the album comes by way of the massive, stadium-ready "Inhaler," which takes the sparkling, slow build used throughout the album and turns it on its ear with an eruption of massively fuzzy, Muse-esque guitars (and, to some extent, their bombast), creating one of the albums biggest and most rousing moments. Now that they're three albums deep, it feels as if Foals have found a nice middle ground between funk and feeling, making Holy Fire an album that is just as likely to get a room moving as it is to send its inhabitants into a fit of introspective conversation. This kind of duality is something that's hard to find, and it's a quality that could take Foals a long way if they're able to hold onto it. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 31, 2013 | Warner Records

Videos Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
While there are lots of bands dealing in either danceable rock or navel-gazing pop, few bands combine the two quite like Foals. On Holy Fire, the third album from the English band, the post-punk revival is given a newfound sense of depth, creating songs that are rhythmic enough to draw listeners, but hypnotic enough to leave listeners lost in their wide-open spaces. This combination of atmosphere and momentum find Foals growing out of the shadows of titans like the Talking Heads and into a spaced-out, dance-punk niche that's all their own. Though a lot of the band's charm comes from the delicate interplay between the guitars and keyboards, the real star of the album comes by way of the massive, stadium-ready "Inhaler," which takes the sparkling, slow build used throughout the album and turns it on its ear with an eruption of massively fuzzy, Muse-esque guitars (and, to some extent, their bombast), creating one of the albums biggest and most rousing moments. Now that they're three albums deep, it feels as if Foals have found a nice middle ground between funk and feeling, making Holy Fire an album that is just as likely to get a room moving as it is to send its inhabitants into a fit of introspective conversation. This kind of duality is something that's hard to find, and it's a quality that could take Foals a long way if they're able to hold onto it. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 8, 2019 | Warner Records

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Not one album, but two! Foals are back after a four-year break following the release of their acclaimed What Went Down. Yannis Philippakis’s band, whose novelty was starting to fade, is now writing a new chapter. Instead of a lengthy double album, so as not to scare their fans away, the Oxford quartet opted for two albums, one released in the spring, the other in the fall. Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost Part 1 does not have the high intensity of its predecessor, but it is still a piece of powerful rock full of exquisite pieces and crescendos (Exits, White Onions, Syrups) like these stage legends know how to make. Walter Gervers has left the band to pursue new adventures, and Foals chose to soften their style. Philippakis is producing for the first time, and the charismatic leader is having a blast working with new textures full of stage-tailored electro beats (Moonlight, In degress), percussive melodies (Cafe d’Athens – Radiohead’s In Rainbow), and introspective ballads played on the piano (I’m Done With The World (& It’s Done With Me)). This new chapter is only just getting started! © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 18, 2019 | Warner Records

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Following in the footsteps of 2018's Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost, Pt. 1, the second installment of the groove-heavy, Oxford-based post-rockers' ambitious, two-part saga of a post-social and environmental apocalypse aims past the nosebleed seats and into the adjacent parking lot. Bold, brash, and cavernous, the ten-track set eschews some of the stylistic nuances of its predecessor in favor of something more primal and dark, yet still eminently danceable. There are no serpentine melodies to parse on funked-up, overcast bangers like "The Runner," "Like Lightning," and "Black Bull," the latter of which see frontman Yannis Philippakis at his most vocally unhinged. Foals have always been more about feeling and mood than knotty songcraft, and Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost doubles down on that predilection with meaty slabs of electro-soul dance rock that are as straightforward as they are spilling over with intent. Sonic outliers "Into the Surf" and the epic closer "Neptune" swap out driving beats for oceanic swells, Both tracks, specifically the just-over-ten-minute "Neptune," serve up some truly transcendent moments, but for the most part, Foals are sticking to the formulaic darkness of past outings. Still, few bands are as adept at creating safe spaces with which to flail, lurch, spin, and kick amidst the ever-amplifying discord of the information age. Whether or not they needed two full-length albums to fill up the dancefloor this time around is up for debate, but while Foals may be peddling a familiar product, there's no denying its efficacy. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2015 | Warner Records

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Following up Holy Fire can’t have been easy ... And to do so, Foals fling themselves headlong into a rock ‘n’ roll tsunami. With What Went Down, the Oxford gang retain their unique rock essence whilst also aiming for a wider audience. This, their fourth studio album, is undoubtedly another radical change for the band. In reaching a larger public, one might think that Yannis Philippakis and his band would have to sell their souls to the devil… The truth is quite to the contrary. What Went Down possesses a sound that hits home at the end of the first listen; the album’s guitars are rhythmic, colossal as mountains. The title track, in particular, is a force that sweeps away everything in its path, helpfully aided by the vocal charisma of Philippakis. Dark and oppressive, the album never loses sight of the importance of song structure. Raw power is an asset, a weapon for Foals, and never simply an end in itself. So much the better. This is a strong contender for the title of best indie rock album of 2015…
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Rock - Released June 12, 2020 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released July 31, 2020 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released October 9, 2020 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 8, 2008 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2015 | Warner Records

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After the international chart success of 2013's Holy Fire, Foals officially embrace that album's rich, atmospheric post-punk revivalism over the rawer math rock tendencies of earlier LPs for their fourth full-length, What Went Down. Only ghostly traces of math rock remain on the album, such as when sustained synths wash over interlocking drum-guitar meters on the closer, "A Knife in the Ocean." The majority of the record avoids any prior levels of intricacy, opting instead for intense airiness in the form of passionate, danceable ruminations. Above all, the album is driving; even at relatively sleepier moments, drums kick in as if on cue and set any lost momentum back on track ("Give It All"). Vocalist Yannis Philippakis pushes his voice harder than ever before here, both in terms of range and strain, and his ability to at times resonate like Ian Curtis and soar like Bono is no small feat. The sparkling, rockin' title-track opener introduces his yowl with a clamoring swagger throughout the instrumentation, and with lyrics like "I buried my guilt in a pit in the sound/With the rust and the vultures and the trash downtown." Also vigorous, the particularly post-punky, motoric "Snake Oil" later plows straight into the lighter but rhythmically locomotive-like "Night Swimmers." There are calmer moments, like the slower, more spare "London Thunder ("I'm on the red-eye flight to nowhere good"), but the album's intensity and pulse remain. Ultimately, What Went Down should please fans of Holy Fire, and they may not be the only ones drawn to its gloomy and persistent energy. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 31, 2013 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 12, 2010 | Sub Pop Records

After Foals scrapped the mix of their debut, Antidotes, by TV on the Radio’s Dave Sitek, it was clear that they were a band that was interested in creating their own sound. That sentiment may be why their follow-up, Total Life Forever, sounds more like a reaction to their first record than a continuation of it. Many of the elements that drove Foals into the spotlight in the first place are definitely still in place. There’s plenty of cascading, Minus the Bear-style guitar work and funky Talking Heads influence in their math-pop-meets-the-dancefloor rhythms. What’s missing is the edge. Total Life Forever is considerably more subdued than its predecessor, lacking much of the uptempo thump found on Antidotes. In its place is a mellower, more spacious sound. While this new sound is still danceable, it’s far more refined than the angular post-punk riffing that fans might be expecting. Right from the beginning, the album-opening, “Blue Blood” makes it clear that Foals are taking a different, more patient approach to songwriting, letting the song build and build on itself as it methodically works itself into a frenzy before leaving the way it came in. Because of the changes here, fans of the early, pre-Antidotes singles may find Total Life Forever to be too restrained, lacking the youthful vigor of their debut. Where some see restraint, others may very well see refinement, and those who appreciated Antidotes' more spacy passages will find that Foals' reinvention of their sound is a calculated risk that definitely pays off. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 18, 2019 | Warner Records

Following in the footsteps of 2018's Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost, Pt. 1, the second installment of the groove-heavy, Oxford-based post-rockers' ambitious, two-part saga of a post-social and environmental apocalypse aims past the nosebleed seats and into the adjacent parking lot. Bold, brash, and cavernous, the ten-track set eschews some of the stylistic nuances of its predecessor in favor of something more primal and dark, yet still eminently danceable. There are no serpentine melodies to parse on funked-up, overcast bangers like "The Runner," "Like Lightning," and "Black Bull," the latter of which see frontman Yannis Philippakis at his most vocally unhinged. Foals have always been more about feeling and mood than knotty songcraft, and Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost doubles down on that predilection with meaty slabs of electro-soul dance rock that are as straightforward as they are spilling over with intent. Sonic outliers "Into the Surf" and the epic closer "Neptune" swap out driving beats for oceanic swells, Both tracks, specifically the just-over-ten-minute "Neptune," serve up some truly transcendent moments, but for the most part, Foals are sticking to the formulaic darkness of past outings. Still, few bands are as adept at creating safe spaces with which to flail, lurch, spin, and kick amidst the ever-amplifying discord of the information age. Whether or not they needed two full-length albums to fill up the dancefloor this time around is up for debate, but while Foals may be peddling a familiar product, there's no denying its efficacy. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 5, 2019 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released September 16, 2019 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 28, 2015 | Warner Records

After the international chart success of 2013's Holy Fire, Foals officially embrace that album's rich, atmospheric post-punk revivalism over the rawer math rock tendencies of earlier LPs for their fourth full-length, What Went Down. Only ghostly traces of math rock remain on the album, such as when sustained synths wash over interlocking drum-guitar meters on the closer, "A Knife in the Ocean." The majority of the record avoids any prior levels of intricacy, opting instead for intense airiness in the form of passionate, danceable ruminations. Above all, the album is driving; even at relatively sleepier moments, drums kick in as if on cue and set any lost momentum back on track ("Give It All"). Vocalist Yannis Philippakis pushes his voice harder than ever before here, both in terms of range and strain, and his ability to at times resonate like Ian Curtis and soar like Bono is no small feat. The sparkling, rockin' title-track opener introduces his yowl with a clamoring swagger throughout the instrumentation, and with lyrics like "I buried my guilt in a pit in the sound/With the rust and the vultures and the trash downtown." Also vigorous, the particularly post-punky, motoric "Snake Oil" later plows straight into the lighter but rhythmically locomotive-like "Night Swimmers." There are calmer moments, like the slower, more spare "London Thunder ("I'm on the red-eye flight to nowhere good"), but the album's intensity and pulse remain. Ultimately, What Went Down should please fans of Holy Fire, and they may not be the only ones drawn to its gloomy and persistent energy. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 9, 2020 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2008 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released January 21, 2019 | Warner Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 10, 2010 | Warner Records