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Alternative & Indie - Released September 20, 2019 | Elektra (NEK)

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Fitz and the Tantrums continue their run of hooky pop offerings with 2019's infectious All the Feels. Having first grabbed fans with the retro '60s-style soul that made up their 2010 debut, Pickin' Up the Pieces, the band led by lead singer Michael Fitzpatrick quickly evolved into a slick, modern pop outfit with 2013's More Than Just a Dream. It was a transition that they completed with 2016's Fitz and the Tantrums, an uber-glossy production that spawned the ubiquitous double-platinum hit "HandClap" and firmly established the group as a pop phenomenon. It was also a creative transformation that divided fans, leaving some feeling that the group had abandoned their distinctive vintage-inspired sound in favor of a more mainstream pop sensibility. All the Feels arrives very much in the same vein as its two predecessors, with songs like "123456," "Ain't Nobody But Me," and "SuperMagik" built upon kinetic synth riffs, programmed-percussion grooves, and Fitzpatrick's warmly resonant vocals. While it's probably not going to change anyone's opinion about the band, the album does a better job of balancing sugary pop hooks with an emotive uplift that feels genuine. The best moments on All the Feels, like the power-poppy "I Need Help!" and the new wave-sounding "OCD," balance hooks with a textured '80s-inspired production that pulls you deeper into the rousing energy of the choruses. That said, as the title implies, there are more than just upbeat anthems on All the Feels, and cuts like the title track, "Basement," and "Dark Days," while still uplifting, find Fitzpatrick drawing ever so slightly upon how the turmoil of the modern social climate can negatively affect your outlook. These aren't really protest songs, but they are songs meant to inspire fortitude during tough times. On "Dark Days" he sings, "Imma keep dreamin' in these dark days/'Cuz you never know." Regardless of sentiment, this track, like many of the tracks on All the Feels, straddles the line between club bangers and kids pop mixtape fodder, leaving you in a better mood than you were in before you hit Play. ~ Matt Collar
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 10, 2016 | Elektra (NEK)

Fitz & the Tantrums' third full-length record is a fun, exuberant album that finds the Los Angeles outfit moving completely away from their old-school R&B roots and embracing a slick, contemporary dance-pop style. Even on their second album, 2013's More Than Just a Dream, Fitz & the Tantrums were already experimenting with shaking up the '60s Motown influence of their debut with an '80s-style new wave sound built around producer Tony Hoffer's vibrant synths, punchy electric guitars, and even electronic flourishes. It was a savvy move and resulted in a robust production rife with catchy hooks that still maximized the dual lead vocals of Michael Fitzpatrick and Noelle Scaggs. For this album, Fitzpatrick collaborated with songwriter Sam Hollander (Neon Trees, Panic! At the Disco, Katy Perry), whose voguish sensibilities and skill with clubby programmed beats helped shape the album's state-of-the-art vibe. Also helping to sculpt the cutting-edge sound in Fitzpatrick's head is producer Jesse Shatkin (Sia, Tegan & Sara), who helmed eight of the album's cuts with Joel Little (Ellie Goulding, Lorde) and Ricky Reed (Jessie J, Jason Derulo) handling the rest. The result is an unabashed creative transformation that takes the same approach as its predecessor with an even heavier reliance on electronics and EDM-influenced studio aesthetics. Thankfully, Fitz & the Tantrums have lost none of the funky, sweaty, high-energy soul that made their previous work so indelible. If anything, cuts like the lead-off "HandClap" and the cheekily sexy "Complicated," with their crisp beats and laser-horn synths, are a perfect showcase for Fitzpatrick and Scaggs' highly resonant, melodic vocals. And it's not just the booty-shaking numbers that grab you. Cuts like the yearning "Burn It Down" and the lovelorn "Run It" stick in your head and bring to mind the poignant singer/songwriter electronica of artists like Imogen Heap and Frankmusik. Ultimately, while Fitz & the Tantrums' contemporary dance-pop sound is decades away from the aesthetic of their debut, it works, and it's hard to imagine fans not wanting to take make the leap with them. ~ Matt Collar
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 25, 2016 | Elektra (NEK)

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 28, 2017 | Elektra (NEK)

Fitz & the Tantrums' third full-length record is a fun, exuberant album that finds the Los Angeles outfit moving completely away from their old-school R&B roots and embracing a slick, contemporary dance-pop style. Even on their second album, 2013's More Than Just a Dream, Fitz & the Tantrums were already experimenting with shaking up the '60s Motown influence of their debut with an '80s-style new wave sound built around producer Tony Hoffer's vibrant synths, punchy electric guitars, and even electronic flourishes. It was a savvy move and resulted in a robust production rife with catchy hooks that still maximized the dual lead vocals of Michael Fitzpatrick and Noelle Scaggs. For this album, Fitzpatrick collaborated with songwriter Sam Hollander (Neon Trees, Panic! At the Disco, Katy Perry), whose voguish sensibilities and skill with clubby programmed beats helped shape the album's state-of-the-art vibe. Also helping to sculpt the cutting-edge sound in Fitzpatrick's head is producer Jesse Shatkin (Sia, Tegan & Sara), who helmed eight of the album's cuts with Joel Little (Ellie Goulding, Lorde) and Ricky Reed (Jessie J, Jason Derulo) handling the rest. The result is an unabashed creative transformation that takes the same approach as its predecessor with an even heavier reliance on electronics and EDM-influenced studio aesthetics. Thankfully, Fitz & the Tantrums have lost none of the funky, sweaty, high-energy soul that made their previous work so indelible. If anything, cuts like the lead-off "HandClap" and the cheekily sexy "Complicated," with their crisp beats and laser-horn synths, are a perfect showcase for Fitzpatrick and Scaggs' highly resonant, melodic vocals. And it's not just the booty-shaking numbers that grab you. Cuts like the yearning "Burn It Down" and the lovelorn "Run It" stick in your head and bring to mind the poignant singer/songwriter electronica of artists like Imogen Heap and Frankmusik. Ultimately, while Fitz & the Tantrums' contemporary dance-pop sound is decades away from the aesthetic of their debut, it works, and it's hard to imagine fans not wanting to take make the leap with them. ~ Matt Collar
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 20, 2019 | Elektra (NEK)

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Dance - Released September 2, 2016 | Elektra (NEK)

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 24, 2010 | Dangerbird Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 17, 2019 | Elektra (NEK)

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Pop - Released | Dangerbird Records

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The first full-length album from Fitz & the Tantrums (which recycles two tunes from their debut EP, 2009's Songs for a Break Up, Vol. 1), Pickin' Up the Pieces finds this L.A.-based sextet breaking out big time within the soul revival underground, though for a band that plays heavily on their D.I.Y. cred -- as their press materials frequently note, this album was primarily recorded in lead singer Michael Fitzpatrick's living room -- these songs find them playing to the polished and poppier end of the R&B spectrum. Principle songwriter Fitzpatrick and Tantrums' arranger James King (who also plays sax) lean to the more refined sounds of classic-era Motown, and the East Coast and Chicago styles that informed Northern soul, rather than the grittier Southern soul artists who recorded for Stax or Goldwax, and while these songs show a strong and obvious influence of classic ‘60s soul, there's more than a dash of contemporary pop in the way the hooks make themselves felt, the stylish layers of backing vocals, and the occasional use of drum loops. This is soul from the upscale night spot rather than the juke joint, but it's a club that's well worth the cover charge; Fitzpatrick is a significantly better than the average blue-eyed soul crooner, his vocal partner Noelle Scaggs is good enough that one wishes she got more space in the spotlight, and under King's direction, the band cuts an impressive groove without cluttering up the arrangements or depending too strongly on their influences to convincingly conjure the sound of the classic era of soul. Fitz & the Tantrums may lack some of the sweaty muscle of Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings, the current titans of the retro-soul scene, but this band is clearly going for a different approach, and on their own terms they've made a solid album that fuses past and present and creates a space that's a cool place to be. ~ Mark Deming
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2019 | Elektra (NEK)

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 28, 2019 | Elektra (NEK)

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 6, 2016 | Elektra (NEK)

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 8, 2019 | Elektra Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 15, 2019 | Elektra (NEK)

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Pop - Released November 26, 2010 | Dangerbird Records

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Pop - Released August 11, 2009 | Dangerbird Records

Pop - Released | Dangerbird Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 3, 2016 | Elektra (NEK)

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Dance - Released July 29, 2016 | Elektra (NEK)

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2017 | Elektra (NEK)