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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Capitol Records

Following Capitol/EMI's last Fats Domino CD compilation (Fats Domino Jukebox: 20 Greatest Hits the Way You Originally Heard Them) by five years, 2007's Greatest Hits: Walking to New Orleans betters that comp in terms of sheer numbers (as it does 1990s My Blue Heaven) by ten tracks and this is a case when more is indeed more. Ten tracks is enough to offer depth, particularly in his earliest sides but also with a couple lesser-known hits from his rock & roll prime, turning this into a joyous overview of one of the greatest musicians of the '50s. It's nice to have this hit the pre-rock & roll and R&B a bit harder -- "Ain't That a Shame" doesn't roll around 'til track six, then it's another ten before "Blueberry Hill" kicks off the string of crossovers -- because it illustrates how hard this rocker, who often gets pigeonholed as merely a genial piano player, really rocked. And though he cut other great material during his Imperial Records stint, it is surely one of the most consistent bodies of work in rock & roll/R&B, heard to full effect either in the four-disc Walking to New Orleans or the complete Bear Family box: for those who don't want or need to delve that deeply, or are just beginning to explore, this is nothing less than essential. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$63.99

Blues - Released January 1, 2016 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

If you can't quite finance the Bear Family box, this four-disc compilation is the next best thing; an even 100 of the best Imperial sides, including a great many from 1958 on that turn up in crystal-clear stereo (as they also do on the Bear Family package). All the hits are aboard, along with a nice cross section of the important non-hits. The saxes (usually including Herb Hardesty and sometimes Lee Allen) roar with typical Crescent City power, Fats rolls the ivories, and magic happens -- over and over again! Another nice booklet with plenty of photos (but a less detailed discography without sideman credits). ~ Bill Dahl
$12.99

R&B - Released February 2, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Like many of the early legends of rock & roll, Fats Domino didn't command a lot of attention in the late '60s. Not only had the British Invasion pushed Fats, Chuck, Little Richard, and their contemporaries off the charts, but post-1965 developments like psychedelia and folk-rock made straightforward rock & roll and rolling New Orleans R&B sound a little old-fashioned. In other words, it was time for the first generation to stage a comeback. Producer Richard Perry never neglects the essentials of Fats' music -- he retains the easygoing charm and endearing shuffles, just updating it slightly. In retrospect, Fats Is Back feels like Perry's blueprint for Ringo Starr's star-studded extravaganzas of the mid-'70s -- he selects an impeccable set of songs, nearly all covers but not just relying on obvious selections, assembles a first-rate cast of musicians, and then puts on a show. After all, this is an album that begins with a roll call of Domino's greatest hits and then ends with "One More Song for You" -- it's intended to be spectacular and it comes damn close to being one. Part of the reason Fats Is Back works is that it's designed to entertain but never oversells itself -- sort of like the man himself, actually. Fats delivers tailor-made new songs, Barbara George's "I Know," a remake of his classic "I'm Ready," and two Beatles covers (McCartney's Fats tribute "Lady Madonna" and "Lovely Rita") with equal gusto. Years on from its initial release, Fats Is Back still sounds like a sly, endearing update of the classic Domino sound. It may not match his classic Imperial recordings, yet it will no doubt please anyone wishing to dig a little deeper. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

French Music - Released December 7, 2018 | Diggers Factory

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Miscellaneous - Released February 8, 1957 | Impérial

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Blues - Released January 1, 2002 | Parlophone Catalogue

Released in conjunction in 2002 with the four-disc box set Walking to New Orleans, as well as three other titles in EMI/Capitol's Crescent City Soul series, The Fats Domino Jukebox: 20 Greatest Hits the Way You Originally Heard Them becomes the definitive single-disc Fats collection on the market nearly by default -- it's remastered, it's the one in print, and it has a flawless selection of songs. It's not markedly better than, say, the '90s' definitive Fats compilation, My Blue Heaven, since it has essentially the same track selection and even if the tapes were restored to their originally running speed, the difference is not enough for most ears to notice, but it's still a great collection of some of the greatest music of its time, and it summarizes Domino's peaks excellently. So, if you don't already have a Fats Domino collection, this surely is the one to get (despite the really ugly art). ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released May 30, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Recorded in 1973, Live in Montreux features Fats Domino running through all of his greatest hits -- "Blueberry Hill," "Ain't That A Shame," "I'm Walking," and several others. Domino is in good spirits and his band is competent, but they deliver no real sparks. It's an enjoyable live album, but it offers nothing out of the ordinary, so only dedicated fans need apply. ~ Thom Owens
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R&B - Released February 2, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Blues - Released January 9, 2019 | SPV

Blue Label's double-disc 2007 release Sentimental Journey: Live at the University of New Orleans captures a 1987 concert from the Fat Man, as he rolled through 26 songs. A bunch of the big hits are here -- all the ones that the casual fan knows, such as "I'm Walking," "Ain't That a Shame," and "Blueberry Hill" -- plus some rollicking numbers better known to Fats and New Orleans aficionados, such as "Please Don't Leave," "Poor Me," and "Going to the River." Domino is in good form -- he may not hit the high notes like he did 30 years prior, but his singing is as robust as his propulsive piano -- and the band is a bunch of pros who keep the groove rolling (although the bassist is far too busy, particularly on "The Fat Man," where his incessant popping is distracting). This is neither Fats at his best nor worst, but rather just a good solid double down the middle -- maybe not the kind of album that's your first choice to put on, but once it's playing it's hard not to get caught up in its infectious good times. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Soul - Released December 13, 2016 | Westmill

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Jazz - Released May 30, 2018 | Shami Media Group 3

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Blues - Released March 25, 2016 | Westmill

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R&B - Released January 1, 1959 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Soul - Released November 16, 2016 | Westmill

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R&B - Released October 24, 2000 | Monrose Digital

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Blues - Released October 11, 1996 | SendMusic

By the time Fat debuted with this self-titled release in 1997, fusing rap and rock was nothing new. Rockers ranging from the Red Hot Chili Peppers to Rage Against the Machine had done their share of rapping, and rappers like Run-D.M.C., Ice-T and the Beastie Boys had never been shy about the fact that they were seriously into rock. Nonetheless, combining rock and rap was something that still had a lot of creative possibilities, and Fat reminded us of that fact on this exhilarating CD. Although the band's music isn't revolutionary, there's a definite freshness to "What We Do," "Dog" and other forceful alternative rock tunes that incorporate a great deal of rapping. Fat (whose music is also influenced by metal and punk) knows how to have fun, and quite often, its songs are as infectious as they are aggressive. Highly recommended. ~ Alex Henderson

R&B - Released June 7, 1994 | Alía Discos

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R&B - Released January 1, 2003 | Shout Factory Records

Pop - Released March 26, 2018 | Quimbaya Entretenimiento S.A.S.

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Soul - Released August 7, 2017 | Ideal Music

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Fats Domino in the magazine