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Dance - Released October 23, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Trip Hop - Released August 30, 2005 | Cheeky Records

Having been making music for over ten years (their first single, "Salva Mea," hit British airwaves in 1995), English club superstars Faithless celebrated their longevity by issuing Forever Faithless, a greatest-hits compilation that contains nearly all of their singles ("Take the Long Way Home," "Crazy English Summer," and "If Lovin' You Is Wrong" are missing) as well as one brand new track, "Reasons (Saturday Night)" (the U.K. version has two more that aren't on here). And while most of the songs fall easily into the house realm, there are a few -- "Don't Leave," "Mass Destruction" -- that venture into pop and trip-hop (or perhaps trip-pop) and show off the band's versatility, or at least ability to appeal to a wider swatch of people. There aren't really any surprises on Forever Faithless, and the selections are pretty much spread out between all four of the group's full-length releases -- meaning that if you already own them there's not much of a reason to get this album except for the new track, which is good but not exceptional -- but it makes for a very successful overview of the band nonetheless. © Marisa Brown /TiVo
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Electronic - Released October 9, 2015 | Cheeky Records

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Trip Hop - Released July 24, 2005 | Cheeky Records

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Pop - Released July 25, 1997 | Arista

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Trip Hop - Released July 24, 2004 | Cheeky Records

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Pop - Released July 24, 2015 | Cheeky Records

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Pop - Released July 24, 2015 | Cheeky Records

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Pop - Released July 24, 1996 | Cheeky Records

Maxi Jazz, the maestro behind Faithless, is well titled as "the grand oral disseminator." The tales he spins make this album a manifesto, religious experience, sexual escapade, and 24-hour rave all rolled up into one tightly constructed package. As Jazz explored hip-hop through the 1980s and his path converged with dub superstar Jah Wobble, the ultra funky Jamiroquai, and the Soul II Soul amalgamation (among others), the foundation was laid for the delicious blend of genres and sounds that would break through in the mid-'90s. Reverence is the culmination of all those experiences, as Jazz unleashes a fat packet worth of songs that are really an acid house tapestry in disguise. This album is best heard in one sitting, where all its styles work together to tell the story. But break it apart, peel the layers back, and the songs stand alone as well. The hypnotic title track serves nicely as an introduction, before it's waylaid by the downtempo soul ballad "Don't Leave," which is replete with needle, pops, and skips throughout. "Salva Mea," "Insomnia," and "Dirty Ol' Man," three very different songs, tangle themselves together and pick up the thread from "Reverence." "Angeline," meanwhile, emerges as a perfectly impassioned love song. The U.S. release includes the bonus "Monster Mix Radio Edit" of "Insomnia." Maxi Jazz hits a deep chord with this album. It's clubby enough for the kiddies, but is incredibly complex beyond the dancefloor. The songs are great, the beats are compelling, and it's almost impossible to not bounce around the room while listening. But this album is also a collection of shadows, of mirror images, where songs mimic one another before spinning off to do their own thing. Moments are caught and lost, tangled, and straightened out. Really, it's brilliant. © Amy Hanson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released July 24, 2004 | Cheeky Records

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Dance - Released October 23, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

The eighth LP from the London electronica outfit appears 25 years after their formation and a decade after from 2010's The Dance. It features guest appearances from artists such as Damien Jurado, Jazzie B, and Gaika, as well as the lead single "Synthesizer," a collaboration with singer/songwriter Nathan Ball. © James Wilkinson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released May 28, 2012 | Nates Tunes

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Electronic - Released August 26, 2007 | Nate's Tunes

Following their number one greatest-hits collection Forever Faithless from the previous year, Faithless released their fifth studio album, To All New Arrivals, at the end of 2006 while the former was still enjoying its extended run on the charts. Chartwise, it was a step backward for the band that had been progressively reaching higher and higher, culminating in the chart-topping album No Roots. The album title referred to the new babies in the families of bandmembers Rollo and Sister Bliss, but could have equally referred to the tracks, most of which feature collaborations including Harry Collier, Robert Smith from the Cure, Cat Power, and former member Dido on the track "Last This Day." The album opens with a phone call that could have been made from the Twin Towers in 2001, a woman's voice saying "If I don't get out of this, I just want you to know that I really really love you." Then the track "Bombs" moves into trance territory, with an antiwar political message and a chorus that declares there is "so much love, so much pain, so much more than I thought could ever contain." Smith is featured on the track "Spiders, Crocodiles & Kryptonite," with a pulsing beat, distressed children sounds, and a sample of his own number "Lullaby" -- there are also harmonies that remind one of Massive Attack's "Unfinished Symphony." It's pleasant to hear Dido back on a Faithless track, but unfortunately the song "Last This Time" does not have a tune, and the title track -- although backed by a pulsing dance beat -- comes across as a little too preachy, informing the listener how many children die in the world per year from malnutrition, malaria, or other preventable causes. There are three instrumentals, the repetitive tinkling "Nate's Tune," the trancelike "I Hope," and the final track, "Emergency," which throws everything including the kitchen sink into a seven-minute soundscape, but ultimately leaves one feeling dissatisfied that Faithless have offered so much more in the past, and could have on this album as well. © Sharon Mawer /TiVo
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Electronic - Released July 24, 2015 | Cheeky Records

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Trip Hop - Released July 24, 2004 | Arista

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Dance - Released July 17, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Trip Hop - Released July 24, 2002 | Arista

Precisely when they needed to reach down their own throats and pull out some high-energy guts and glory, Faithless returned to offer one more sham: trance comedown into meaningless muttering and patented plasticine R&B. Thing is, while there's something to be said about understatement, Rollo and Sister Bliss -- being Rollo and Sister Bliss -- seem perennially preoccupied with chasing the tail of clubland zeitgeist, lacking ingenuity to recapture either their "Insomnia" or "God Is a DJ" ethereal highs, to ever get their heads around such a concept. Outrospective is a veritable cesspit of introspection, happy to dish out varying MOR versions of Angelo Badalamenti's oeuvre, and gawk at the way sagging comeback singles like "We Come 1" flatline the whimsy of Underworld's "Oich Oich" with an utter lack of abandon. © Dean Carlson /TiVo
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Dance - To be released August 6, 2021 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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Electronic - Released March 18, 2012 | Nates Tunes

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Dance - Released August 28, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Ltd

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