Similar artists

Albums

$17.99
$14.99

Country - Released October 5, 2018 | EMI Records Nashville

Hi-Res
Country has always enjoyed a faithful fan base. Although the genre's golden age has since moved on from honkytonks and the Texas of the 1950s, it is hard to rival the charm of Eric Church. The forty-something year old from North Carolina is keeping these American legends alive. Halfway between Tony Joe White and John Prine, he has been making country rock with songwriting at its heart since the release of his first album in 2006, Sinners Like Me. Church has become a touchstone and an icon, transforming every new record almost into some sort of national event. With Desperate Man, he has shown that his superstar status has done nothing to dampen his creativity. Co-written with the Texan Ray Wylie Hubbard, it's a country pop record with swamp influences and more than a little groove that gives life to the spirit of the American South. Far from Luke Brian or Tim McGraw, Desperate Man carries a real emotional charge. Here is a man looking for spiritual stability in a world which seems to have lost its bearings. The title track speaks of desperation after going to pray at the Joshua Tree: Eric Church winds up with a fortune teller who tells him that he has no future at all. So be it, he says. And so he decides to concentrate on doing what he does best. The album opens with the winding of a swamp snake around couplets recited in a deep and mysterious voice. This traditional swamp rock is swiftly swept away by the rhythms of Hangin’ Around. The head-nodding and foot-tapping is quickly overtaken by some sugary pop à la Hank Jr. on Some Of It. Church gets his measurements just right on every track. “Boo boo boo" base humour and Rolling Stones sounds on Desperate Man, steel guitar distortion on Solid and through it all, that faintly nasal voice. This ninth album, brilliantly produced by Jay Joyce (Emmylou Harris, John Hiatt, Iggy Pop…), definitely deserves its spot at the Opry. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
$12.99

Country - Released November 11, 2015 | EMI Records Nashville

$8.99

Country - Released November 4, 2016 | EMI Records Nashville

An EP recorded during Eric Church's two-night stint at Red Rocks during August 2016, the six-track Mr. Misunderstood on the Rocks Live and (Mostly) Unplugged delivers what the title promises -- live recordings of songs from 2015's Mr. Misunderstood where Church is generally anchored on an acoustic. This doesn't mean he's alone: apart from "Knives of New Orleans" and a closing cover of Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah," which was recorded months before the songwriter's death, he's supported by his full band, most of them playing relatively softly if they're not playing acoustic instruments. "Mistress Named Music" gets expanded into a medley featuring a bunch of '70s singer/songwriter mainstays plus George Strait's "Troubadour" -- a quick and effective portrait of Church's roots -- and "Mixed Drinks About Feelings" is performed as a duet with backup singer Joanna Cotten, but the real reason the EP is worthwhile is the overall feel of the performances. Stripped back to their sinew, Church and his band sound stronger than they did on the overblown Caught in the Act, and just a year after their release, the songs are seeming like modern classics. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Country - Released September 15, 2017 | EMI Records Nashville

Download not available

Country - Released November 17, 2017 | EMI Records Nashville

Download not available
$13.49
$11.49

Country - Released November 4, 2015 | EMI Records Nashville

Hi-Res
Arriving after the deliberately overblown The Outsiders -- an outlaw album pumped up on steroids, gaining its resonance through its slow songs -- Mr. Misunderstood feels like a correction: a swift, modest album shorn of excess, released without an iota of pre-release hype. Devoid of the arena rock feints that dogged The Outsiders -- there are no two-part metallic jams, no salutations to damn rock & roll -- Mr. Misunderstood is hardly a back-to-basics move or a refutation of his over-amplified indulgences. Rather, this 2015 record pulls together the strands Church left hanging on his 2014 set, never shuffling country and rock -- or blues or soul, for that matter -- into their own categories. Church creates his own Americana, pulling from the classic rock wallpapering Middle America and the modern country that runs through the sports bars of the suburbs, making nods to swamp funk and soul along the way, but when he tips his cap to Elvis Costello, Ray Wylie Hubbard, and Jeff Tweedy, it's as telling as the Jackson Pollock allusion a few lines later: where other country is provincial, Church embraces the world without repudiating his home. Certainly, there's a strong sense of family flowing throughout Mr. Misunderstood -- he's married to a dream, but his mistress is music; he writes about one son, but puts another on the cover -- but Church takes a cue from "Give Me Back My Hometown," favoring specificity over broad clichés. Take the title track, where he tells a tale that feels autobiographical but he's seeing himself within a teenage outsider stuck in the back of class: here, he opens the door upon the possibility that the rest of the songs on the record -- the tales of heartbreak and longing, maybe even the stories of love and family -- are characters, not confession. Either way, Church's songs are anchored with an authoritative sense of sentiment and place, and they're brought to life by the precise roar of the Eric Church Band. No longer overwhelming with sheer volume, they dig into the funk of "Chattanooga Lucy" and race their leader to the conclusion of "Mr. Misunderstood," but they shine by maintaining the mournful soul of "Round Here Buzz" or by building the tension of "Knives of New Orleans" or by keeping the Susan Tedeschi duet "Mixed Drinks About Feelings" at a sweet, sad simmer. Where The Outsiders was designed to dazzle, Mr. Misunderstood is built for the long haul: it settles into the soul, its pleasures immediate but also sustained. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$14.99

Country - Released January 1, 2006 | Capitol Nashville

At a time when country music was sliding deeper and deeper into a soulless pop rut, Capitol Records Nashville took a chance on North Carolina native Eric Church and his hard-edged music. With one foot planted firmly in the Haggard tradition and the other in the outlaw style of Waylon and Hank Jr., Church stormed onto the charts with his debut album, Sinners Like Me. He grew up listening to the old-school sounds of the Hag and his outlaw brethren, but he also had one ear tuned to the rock & roll sounds rumbling from the other side of the tracks. Sinners Like Me is a cool country-rock hybrid that is far removed from the lameness that is usually associated with the 21st century country music scene. The boot stomping grit of "Before She Does," an electric guitar steeped number that has Church wailing that Jesus will be back before the girl who left him high and dry will, sets the tone for the entire disc. Raw and real pretty much sums up the 11-track collection. One minute Church is reflecting on an old pair of boots that have seen him through many hard times on the mandolin smoked "These Boots," the next he's slipping into the skin of a death row inmate in his final moments on the lump-in-the-throat "Lightning." If you look up the word "authentic" in the dictionary, you just might see a picture of Eric Church. ~ Todd Sterling
$11.49

Country - Released March 24, 2009 | Capitol Nashville

$14.99

Country - Released October 5, 2018 | EMI Records Nashville

$12.99

Country - Released January 1, 2014 | EMI Records Nashville

$29.49

Country - Released January 1, 2013 | CMCapNash (N91)

$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Nashville

Booklet
"The Man in Black woulda whipped your ass/And I don't think Waylon done it that way" -- Eric Church on "Lotta Boot Left to Fill" It's a great line that Eric Church means when he sings, but he can't quite convince listeners that he's in the outlaw tradition of Cash, Waylon, and Hank. Church sings like a manicured model, striking all the poses and hitting all the notes, but missing that essential grit. Of course, he isn't helped out by the production of his second album Carolina, a recording that gleams pristine, designed for two drinks at an after-work smokeless bar, not a long booze-filled night at a honky tonk dive. It's a commercial sound, one that puts Carolina firmly within the mainstream, and it also fits the contours of Church's voice. No matter how much he sings about being "Young and Wild" and how he likes to "Smoke a Little Smoke," he sounds like a guy who wants to cut loose but can't manage to shed his inhibitions, which kind of keeps Carolina in a bit of a straitjacket, never sounding as big and brawny as it wants to be. Church fares better when things get a little less macho, when he slides into the ballads like "Where She Told Me to Go" or tunes that are a little sprightly, like the poppy "Without You Here" and the wistful title track. Although there's a bit of a puppy-dog charm to Church's yearning to be bad, it's these softer numbers that suit his talents, and he'd be better off relying on this instead of trying so hard to be wild. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$12.99

Country - Released January 1, 2013 | Capitol Nashville

$6.49

Country - Released January 1, 2011 | EMI Records Nashville

$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 2011 | EMI Records Nashville

Booklet

News feed Prev. Next

Artist

Eric Church in the magazine
  • Desperately creative
    Desperately creative Country has always enjoyed a faithful fan base. Although the genre's golden age has since moved on from honkytonks and the Texas of the 1950s, it is hard to rival the charm of Eric Church.