Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$27.49
CD$22.49

Folk/Americana - Released March 30, 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Folk/Americana - Released March 27, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

CD$12.99

Folk/Americana - Released March 27, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

CD$12.99

Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 2006 | Vanguard Records

CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Vanguard Records

Andersen's debut album presented him playing in a folkie style that was just starting to become passé upon its release in 1965. It's an inoffensive set of originals (except for a cover of "Baby Please Don't Go") in the early-'60s Greenwich Village style, accompanied only by his own guitar and harmonica (and, on two songs, by Debby Green on second guitar). Whether by coincidence or intention, or some combination thereof, it's highly reminiscent in spots of early Bob Dylan, although Andersen is gentler and more subdued. At times it especially recalls the Freewheelin'-era Dylan, or at least Dylan on that album's most reflective and low-key cuts, such as "Girl from the North Country." Andersen fills a lot of these early compositions with imagery of bumming around the country (hence the title "today is the highway"), adding some love songs. Certainly, however, it's not as forceful or original as the best singer-songwriter folk of the era, not just in comparison to Dylan, but also in comparison to others, such as his friend Tom Paxton. Nor is it as accomplished as his best material on subsequent 1960s recordings. The finest composition here is "Looking Glass," an elaborate first-person narrative-fantasy with a melody similar to folk tunes such as "Scarborough Fair." © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Vanguard Records

On his second album, Andersen took considerable strides toward finding his own voice as a writer, and establishing himself as a noted singer/songwriter. The record featured several songs that would endure among his most renowned compositions. The pretty "Violets of Dawn" was an obvious candidate for a hit record if it was given a folk-rock arrangement, though it never was a hit, in spite of several artists trying. "Thirsty Boots," inspired by the '60s civil rights movement, is one of the better known social commentary folk tunes of the period, although it wasn't that typical of Andersen's repertoire. "Close the Door Lightly When You Go" was one of Andersen's best bittersweet romantic tunes, and covered to good effect by Fairport Convention and the Dillards. At other points, Andersen still sounded a good deal like early Bob Dylan, but on the whole he was outgrowing that early persona, nonetheless often sounding like a gentler and more romantic counterpart to Dylan, with a more conventionally pretty voice. While Debbie Green added second guitar to a couple of songs and Harvey Brooks played electric bass on a couple of others, the album was otherwise just Andersen with his guitar and harmonica, which in 1966 was becoming an old-fashioned way of doing things among contemporary songwriters. Perhaps for that reason, the entire album was redone with electric arrangements and resequenced (although with the exact same 12 songs), and the results were released as Andersen's next album, 'Bout Changes & Things Take Two. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
CD$12.99

Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 2006 | Vanguard Records

Vanguard Records' 1999 Eric Andersen compilation Violets of Dawn differs in only four tracks out of 18 from its 1970 compilation The Best of Eric Andersen, and the selection is marginally improved. (The major difference is that Violets of Dawn contains two rare tracks, "Boots of Blue" and "Rambler's Lament," from the 1964 compilation New Folks, Vol. 2.) The sound, remastered from the original analog tapes, is much improved. Like its similar predecessor, Violets of Dawn collects the most impressive efforts from Andersen's '60s Vanguard recordings, including the title track, "Thirsty Boots," "Close the Door Lightly When You Go," and "Come to My Bedside." It also traces Andersen's musical development from acoustic folk to folk-rock and country, a development that shadowed Bob Dylan's progression during the same period. And it stops short of the excellent work Andersen did with Blue River (1972) on Columbia and Be True to You (1975) on Arista. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Vanguard Records

On his second album with rock instrumentation (following 'Bout Changes & Things, Take 2, his electrified remake of 'Bout Changes & Things), Andersen was growing more comfortable with a folk-rock setting. Lingering comparisons as a gentler Bob Dylan remained inevitable, though, on tracks like "Tin Can Alley Part 1" and "Tin Can Alley Part 2" (which open and close the record, respectively) in both the vocal phrasing and the anxious strings of odd imagery. Similarities, alas, didn't end there. Several New York sessionmen that played on early folk-rock albums by Dylan and others filled out the sound, including Al Kooper, Bobby Gregg, Herb Lovelle, Paul Harris, and Paul Griffin, and "Honey" doesn't sound too far off the Highway 61 Revisited route, though the song isn't great. There was also some period Baroque folk production -- flowery vibes, peppy horns, light dramatic orchestration, and the like -- that add some color and dimension, but also make it dated. Andersen sounded best on his more tuneful and pensive ballads, like "Miss Lonely Are You Blue" and "Just a Little Something"; the more sardonic and lyrically vague outings just don't seem as in tune with his strengths and artistic personality. There are touches of bluesy vaudevillian honky tonk ("Mary Sunshine," "Hello Sun") and good-time pop (also on "Mary Sunshine," interestingly enough). Other tracks, like the lengthy "Rollin' Home (It's a Far Cry From Heaven but a Short Cry From Home)" and "Broken-Hearted Mama," sound rather like the Blues Project's folk-rock ventures. Ultimately it's a respectable but erratic album. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
CD$12.99

Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 2007 | Vanguard Records

CD$12.99

Folk/Americana - Released January 1, 2006 | Vanguard Records

Between 1965 and 1969, Eric Andersen made his mark as the resident romantic of the East Coast folk scene. He also drifted through various musical styles and phases during this period. The Best of Eric Andersen (originally two LPs, reissued on one CD) covers his journeys through Woody Guthrie-style folk ("Dusty Box Car Wall," "My Land Is a Good Land"), Dylanesque imagery ("The Hustler, "a diatribe written for Dylan), folk-rock (he rerecorded his most popular album of the time, 'Bout Changes and Things, with a three-piece band), country ("Just a Country Dream") and poetic love songs ("Violets of Dawn"), and it's a good introduction to Andersen's inconsistent early career. All of his best-known songs from the Vanguard years are here, including "Thirsty Boots," inspired by civil rights organizer Gil Turner, the country-folk "Close the Door Lightly," the exquisite "Violets of Dawn" and the tradition-based American folk of "Dusty Box Car Wall." Andersen, whose long and varied career has ranged from brilliant to lackluster, is an artist desperately in need of a comprehensive anthology. Of the three collections of his material released over the years (two concentrate on his work with particular labels), only the long-deleted The Best Songs (1977) included tracks from his best record, Blue River(1972), which is indispensable on its own and a must for any Eric Andersen retrospective. © Brett Hartenbach /TiVo
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Vanguard Records

Like numerous folk-rock singer/songwriters in the late '60s, Andersen went to Nashville to record country-rock-flavored material, using some of the city's top sessionmen. Charlie McCoy, Ken Buttrey, Norbert Putnam, and David Briggs are all on this record, which doesn't rate among Andersen's strongest '60s albums. The LP's not so much weak as meek, or pleasantly undistinguished. Even by Andersen's own low-key standards, the mood is mild, the songs drifting amiably without a great deal of force. The cover of Otis Redding's "(Sittin On) The Dock of the Bay" and the instrumental "Smashville Jam" seem like padding. The Salvation Army comedy of "Devon, You Look Like Heaven" could have hardly been more ill-placed in the running order, following as it does one of the better and most serious tracks, "Deborah, I Love You" (presumably addressed to his wife, Debbie Green). It's not that overt of a country-styled record, though Weldon Myrick makes his steel guitar heard often and Andersen takes a shot at the hit popularized by Hank Williams, "Lovesick Blues." The best song, though, is the concluding six-minute "Waves of Freedom," which is just as tranquil as the rest of the album, but a little more melodic and moving. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
CD$12.99

Folk/Americana - Released February 1, 1972 | Columbia - Legacy

With mid-'60s gems like Violets of Dawn, Thirsty Boots, and Close the Door Lightly, Eric Andersen became the archetypal, literate romantic before the likes of James Taylor and Jackson Browne had even cut their first records, but at the same time seemed to lack direction from album to album. With his eighth album, Blue River, recorded in Nashville in 1972, he found the perfect setting for his gentle, poetic songs. After nearly seven years of dabbling in folk, folk-rock, pop, and country, Andersen found a smart, sympathetic ear in producer Norbert Putnam. Putnam, whose production here is rarely extraneous, utilizes subtle touches of bass, drums, accordion, and organ along with Andersen's own guitar, piano, and harmonica to frame the material. The record, Andersen's first effort for Columbia, also featured his best collection of tunes to date. Blue River, with its themes of uncertainty and struggle, is by no means a casual record, although songs such as the bittersweet "Is It Really Love at All" and the title track, featuring Joni Mitchell's ethereal supporting vocal, will draw the listener in with their sheer beauty. Andersen, then in his late twenties, was dealing with questions of love, life, and desire with a maturity matched only by a handful of songwriters at the time. Never overly precious or maudlin, nearly every cut resonates with eloquence and grace. Although continuing to grow as a writer in the years to come, Blue River remains Eric Andersen's masterwork and one of the true classics of the genre. © Brett Hartenbach /TiVo
CD$9.99

Rock - Released May 19, 2017 | Meyer Records

CD$7.99

Folk/Americana - Released May 22, 2007 | Appleseed

Eric Andersen got his start as a singer/songwriter just about the time the folk revival went bust in the mid-'60s, when the phrase "singer/songwriter" wasn't familiar, as it is today. Now, some 40 years later, Andersen continues to follow his muse, which includes a deep investment in the blues on the live Blue Rain. Andersen's voice seems to have grown richer and has developed more texture over the span of time, something that rarely happens to rock singers; as a result, his readings of familiar lyrics carry more weight. He kicks off the set with a slow, menacing version of Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life." For folk fans, the song is overly familiar, but Andersen's vocal provides a darker underpinning than the usual, adding a new dimension to this well-worn classic. This and songs like "The Blues Keep Fallin' Like the Rain" might even leave one to wonder if Andersen is channeling Neil. To sweeten the blues mix, Andersen is joined by a solid band that never overplays, giving Blue Rain a simple, no-frills approach. There's more upbeat stuff, with Andersen exchanging his guitar for keyboards, but even here, certain titles -- "Don't It Make You Wanna Sing the Blues" -- can't get away from the album's overarching mood. Blue Rain is a good place to reacquaint oneself with a fine musician and singer. © Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr. /TiVo
CD$8.99

Folk/Americana - Released September 3, 1999 | Earecords

CD$7.99

Folk/Americana - Released February 22, 2000 | Appleseed

This umpteenth collection from veteran folkie Andersen is his most diverse and adventurous in years. Pairing Andersen with Lou Reed on the affecting title cut here may seem like a strange idea, but it makes sense when you hear it. There are also four excellent, recently unearthed tracks that Andersen co-wrote with the late Townes Van Zandt, and a couple of strong original ballads, the best of which -- the moody "Magdalena" about a close friend who died in a car crash -- may alone be worth the price of admission. Less successful are some of the tracks Andersen recorded with Delta blues musicians. The backup is excellent but as Andersen admits in the liner notes, he is not a blues artist, and these tracks fail to take full advantage of his strengths. They also seem tossed off, and indeed they were. Andersen says that since it took him eight years to record his last album, he decided to make this one "quickly and simply." He recorded the blues tracks in two days, and they may leave you wondering whether there might have been some good middle ground between two days and eight years. Overall, though, this is terrific stuff. Particularly if you're already a fan, you won't be disappointed with the lion's share of it. © Jeff Burger /TiVo
CD$8.99

Folk/Americana - Released April 29, 2011 | Earecords

CD$7.99

Folk/Americana - Released September 21, 2004 | Appleseed

This is the first of a projected two-volume set by singer/songwriter Eric Andersen showcasing the songs of his youth, by some of its best-known as well as by all-but-forgotten songwriters from the New York Greenwich Village scene of the early- to mid-'60s. There are modern versions of classics like Buffy Sainte-Marie's "Universal Soldier," Bob Dylan's "Hard Rain's Gonna Fall," Tim Hardin's "Misty Roses," and Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life," and Phil Ochs' "I Ain't Marching Anymore." There are tunes that are now considered obscure tunes too, such as Paul Siebel's "Louise," David Blue's "These 23 Days in September," Patrick Sky's "Many a Mile," Peter La Farge's "Johnny Half-Breed." As well as a pair of originals, in the title track and "Waves of Freedom." What this all amounts to is nothing more than nostalgia. First there's the package: There are no less than three sets of liner notes including an utterly verbose, florid, self-indulgent insult to the intelligence by writer Glenn O'Brien. Next is the music itself. Andersen, despite his plethora of musical guests like Pete Kennedy, Wyclef Jean, Happy Traum, John Sebastian and Sky adds nothing to this material. Andersen's voice is shot; it's ragged and his delivery ridiculously stresses how "important" these songs are, or at least how important they are supposed to be. Make no mistake, they made a difference once, they were anthems and road signs for what was at that time a new consciousness among America's youth -- not the least of which is Andersen's "Waves of Freedom," which is easily the best song on the set. Most of the arrangements here don't work either. A case in point is the army of bagpipes, penny whistles and military drums that overwhelm "I Ain't Marching Anymore": they utterly undermine the poignant meaning and intention of the tune. Actually, in almost every instance, Andersen's ragged manner makes these songs seem like ghosts who've been haunting the landscape for far too long and wish to move on to their rest. Rather than inspire, Andersen's recording comes off as beaten, lost, and bewildered. It feels as if he's trying to convince himself that these songs still mean something, rather than his listeners. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
CD$8.99

Folk/Americana - Released June 16, 1989 | Earecords

CD$8.99

Folk/Americana - Released September 21, 2004 | Appleseed