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Country - Released February 12, 2007 | Mute, a BMG Company

If you made it to 2007 with a fat wallet then you probably aren't a true Erasure fan. Since 2003 the group has been responsible for a slew of sideline releases -- remix albums, acoustic albums, and big stack of limited-edition, souvenir live albums -- with only the 2005 effort Nightbird offering something entirely new. On the Road to Nashville is another live album and the hook here is that the usually electronic, club-oriented act is backed by a live band, which makes for some interesting arrangements. Seeing as how they're performing at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium -- once home to the Grand Ole Opry -- "Blue Savannah" becomes a rollicking hoedown while "Victim of Love" sways in a rustic style, lap steel guitar and all. While these are clever, cute, and fun, seriously delivered tracks like Nightbird's "Breathe" and the chestnut "A Little Respect" are more rewarding with performances that breathe new life into these fan favorites. If you haven't checked in on the boys since the millennium turned, you're better off checking the well-built Nightbird and picking some tracks off the acoustic effort Union Street before venturing here. This is for the hardcore fans, the ones who have endured a mountain of stopgap releases and somehow still beg for more. ~ David Jeffries
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Electronic/Dance - Released January 24, 2005 | Mute, a BMG Company

Starting soft and staying there, Nightbird takes more than a couple listens to pay real dividends, but that Erasure are revitalized is evident first time through. Gone is the trying-too-hard surface-pop of Cowboy and Other People's Songs and back is the intimate, introspective, and great lyrical moments of the ballads scattered among the duo's best albums. Song after song displays that lead singer Andy Bell has grown remarkably as a writer. His vivid tales of isolation and painful regret don't have that Morrissey sting in the tail, but they're just as good for weepy evenings and are just as honest/cathartic as anything the Mozz has written. Bell's prerelease announcement that he's HIV positive explains the malaise that's here and there on Nightbird, but the man's been secretly dealing with the disease since 1998 and his "coming out" relief is reflected in the album's positive energy and extra helping of hope. It's Bell's album, and much like thumbing through his diary, but synth whizz Vince Clarke is up to the task, providing clean and tidy tunes in classic Erasure style. He must have dusted off all his old machinery, since the bleeps and beats of the album are familiar, plus the "woah-oh-oh!" of "No Doubt" brings reminders of the great "Love to Hate You," just at half-tempo. That's something to point out. With only two up-tempo numbers, Nightbird isn't made for the dancefloor. It's a "headphone album" or a "when you're alone" album, and considering the band's campy past, a surprisingly excellent one. Bell's dealings with HIV have obviously influenced Nightbird, but he rarely points right to it, making the album adaptable to any listener's own introspection. Smart, moving, approachable, and well constructed, Nightbird is Erasure's mature masterpiece. ~ David Jeffries
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Electronic/Dance - Released January 27, 2003 | Mute, a BMG Company

While there's nothing wrong with doing an album of covers, putting such a project together has its risks. For Erasure, the experiment yields mixed results. More often than not, they connect with the material in unexpected ways, and certainly with greater success than one might expect from other electronic groups. This is due largely to the fact that these guys have been around long enough to develop a sensitivity to music as being more than a beat and a hook. Their sense of humor leads them to revise "Video Killed the Radio Star" in a way that's not only highly amusing -- it actually suits the message of the song. Plus, Andy Bell remains a very convincing singer, particularly on the softer material, where his choir-boy timbre glistens and shimmers. Problems occur when they can't find a convincing way to graft their highly identifiable sound onto the song. On "True Love Ways," for instance, Vince Clarke's textures are sweet to the point of gag inducement, which makes the squirmy synth lick in the bridge section seem weirdly out of place. While they deserve credit for not mimicking the feel of the records they cover, there's something very unnerving about the disco gallop they inflict on "Ebb Tide." And when they do stay faithful to the original arrangement, as on "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling," all the grandiosity achieved by Phil Spector sounds as if it was being squashed down to Tinker Toy sonics. Finally, just because you're able to insert a cricket sound every time the word "sleeping" occurs on "Goodnight" doesn't necessarily mean it's a good idea. ~ Robert L. Doerschuk
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Electronic/Dance - Released October 23, 2000 | Mute, a BMG Company

Erasure perfected their synth-pop/dance sound in the mid-'80s, and over the course of the next decade and a half they continued within that structure. By 1997's Cowboy, the band lost some of their melodic sense in exchange for the techno dance trip. It is nice to say that on this release Erasure went back to doing what they do best: strong melodic pop music full of angst and pain. There's no real experimentation, just the old form of songwriting. This will not win new fans, but it might win back those few who were turned off by the group's dive into techno. Since 1997, Vince Clarke has collaborated on two experimental projects: 1999's Clarke & Ware Experiment with Martin Ware of Heaven 17 fame and the Family Fantastic album. Neither were too successful, but they did provide platforms for Clarke to expand his writing and playing beyond the pop song format. His return is very much welcomed. Andy Bell's voice has never sounded better, and as usual it fits the music perfectly. A strong album, with some of the best songs they have ever produced (including the wonderful "Freedom" and "Surreal"), this is a classic sounding Erasure album, and it could not be better. ~ Aaron Badgley
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Country - Released April 3, 2006 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 24, 2007 | Mute, a BMG Company

Furthering the incredibly prolific run that it began in 2005 with NIGHTBIRD, the beloved British synth-pop duo Erasure presents its third major release of '07 with STORM CHASER. Largely consisting of remixed tracks that originally appeared on the previous LIGHT AT THE END OF THE WORLD album, this collection includes the pulsing Koishi & Hush Club mix of "Storm in a Teacup" and DJ Manolo's beat-heavy mix of "Sucker for Love," along with "Early Bird," an energetic collaboration with Cyndi Lauper.
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 1, 2017 | Mute, a BMG Company

The kickoff single to Erasure's Light at the End of the World is a classic mix of yearning, bittersweet, and synths, layers and layers of synths by the end of the song. The original version of "I Could Fall in Love with You" is swooning, timeless Erasure, and the remixes don't scream out "2007" either. Jeremy Wheatley's two mixes are Euro-throwbacks that could be from the house of Cerrone, while Lee Monteverde's three tries jump ahead in time just slightly with a sound in line with Erasure's 1991 effort, Chorus. Everything is designed for the dancefloor with the utmost slickness, and while it may be an extremely safe dancefloor, both remixers understand the song and its building overflow of desire. The good B-side "I Like It" reviews itself, and this well-crafted single ends up a necessary if unsurprising release for fans. ~ David Jeffries
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Electronic/Dance - Released October 23, 2015 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 31, 1997 | Mute, a BMG Company

The calmer inner meditations of Erasure behind them, the duo found themselves on Madonna's label in America and released the notably more upbeat Cowboy in 1997. The zeitgeist that the duo perfectly encapsulated in the late '80s had long been left behind, resulting in an album that sounds like it wants to keep the party going when all the guests had long gone home. While Erasure itself could drag here and there, it was still an honestly intriguing combination of new and old for the band, something the pleasant (but little more than that) Cowboy can't claim. At base, the problem is that while the basic Erasure knack of hummable hooks and fine singing remains unchanged, something seems missing -- what made songs like "A Little Respect," "Stop!," and "Chorus" more than enjoyably catchy pop isn't there. Cowboy is amiable but not memorable. Vince Clarke to his credit doggedly resists flat out following current pop trends in the hopes of greater relevance, so there's something to be said for sticking to one's guns. His usual preferred combination of gentler lead synths and rougher bass tones sounds enjoyably supple as well, with perhaps the only concession to late-'90s pop being a greater use of hip-hop beats. Andy Bell's voice as always hits its fine sweet-sounding heights. But beyond a cut or two, very little honestly connects beyond that, sad to say. "In My Arms," released as a single, has an attractive air to it, with a nicely sweeping chorus, but feels a little too relaxed, not as flat out energetic as it could be. ~ Ned Raggett
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 1, 2017 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Electronic/Dance - Released May 21, 2007 | Mute, a BMG Company

After giving themselves room to roam with an acoustic album, a cover album, solo albums, and a slew of live albums, Erasure return to their comfort zone of distrust, disgust, and despair set mostly to a disco beat with the occasional ballad. Think fan favorite Wild! but with more maturity and depth and you're pretty close to painting a perfect picture of their 2007 effort, Light at the End of the World. It should be noted that the added depth has a lot to do with singer Andy Bell's love affair with complete disclosure, which began with the late-2004 announcement that he had long been HIV positive. Here Bell's cleaning of his closet continues with the key track "Storm in a Teacup," a vivid tale of leaving the dysfunctional nest and the bittersweet taste of freedom that comes afterwards. Bell has been forthcoming in the press that his mother's alcoholism influenced the song, but he keeps growing as a songwriter and is smart enough to make his words adaptable to any strife the listener may have back home. Like "Teacup," "How My Eyes Adore You" and "When a Lover Leaves You" are moving, soft, and could have fallen off 2005's very midtempo Nightbird, but those who found that album too sullen and glum should have no problem with "Sucker for Love," a hands-in-the-air rump bouncer with wonderful Bell declarations like "Without love/I'm not tremendous." Dancefloor-aimed singles "Sunday Girl" and "I Could Fall in Love with You" round out the highlights, sounding like classic Erasure hits with bubbly synths and those smart "I love you but you sometimes drive me crazy" lyrics. If Vince Clarke's music has evolved since Erasure's debut you won't hear it here, but with so many hooks and tight arrangements the album is one of the best "go with what you know" arguments since AC/DC. While Erasure certainly didn't need the "return to form" album at this point in their career, they nailed it and brought better songwriting along for the ride. ~ David Jeffries

Electronic/Dance - Released April 2, 2007 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 1, 2017 | Mute, a BMG Company

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$10.49

Electronic/Dance - Released May 21, 2007 | Mute, a BMG Company

After giving themselves room to roam with an acoustic album, a cover album, solo albums, and a slew of live albums, Erasure return to their comfort zone of distrust, disgust, and despair set mostly to a disco beat with the occasional ballad. Think fan favorite Wild! but with more maturity and depth and you're pretty close to painting a perfect picture of their 2007 effort, Light at the End of the World. It should be noted that the added depth has a lot to do with singer Andy Bell's love affair with complete disclosure, which began with the late-2004 announcement that he had long been HIV positive. Here Bell's cleaning of his closet continues with the key track "Storm in a Teacup," a vivid tale of leaving the dysfunctional nest and the bittersweet taste of freedom that comes afterwards. Bell has been forthcoming in the press that his mother's alcoholism influenced the song, but he keeps growing as a songwriter and is smart enough to make his words adaptable to any strife the listener may have back home. Like "Teacup," "How My Eyes Adore You" and "When a Lover Leaves You" are moving, soft, and could have fallen off 2005's very midtempo Nightbird, but those who found that album too sullen and glum should have no problem with "Sucker for Love," a hands-in-the-air rump bouncer with wonderful Bell declarations like "Without love/I'm not tremendous." Dancefloor-aimed singles "Sunday Girl" and "I Could Fall in Love with You" round out the highlights, sounding like classic Erasure hits with bubbly synths and those smart "I love you but you sometimes drive me crazy" lyrics. If Vince Clarke's music has evolved since Erasure's debut you won't hear it here, but with so many hooks and tight arrangements the album is one of the best "go with what you know" arguments since AC/DC. While Erasure certainly didn't need the "return to form" album at this point in their career, they nailed it and brought better songwriting along for the ride. ~ David Jeffries
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Pop - Released September 23, 2014 | Mute

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 2, 2018 | Mute

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 9, 2018 | Mute

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Electronic/Dance - Released July 6, 2018 | Mute

Electronic/Dance - Released May 11, 2018 | Mute

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 1, 2018 | Mute

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