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R&B - Released April 3, 2020 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released August 21, 2001 | Rhino - Elektra

En Vogue may not have been as visionary as TLC, but they were still one of the best female urban groups of the '90s, which is why their Very Best collection works so well. Album by album, they delivered terrific singles, from the swaggering "My Lovin' (You're Never Gonna Get It)" and "Free Your Mind" to the yearning "Don't Let Go (Love)" and "Hold On," plus such wonderful duets as "Whatta Man," where they team with Salt-N-Pepa to deliver a songs so sexy it hurts (but, as John Mellencamp says, it hurts so good). All these are here on this 16-track collection, along with several other singles that didn't climb as high on the charts, plus album tracks, and, well, filler, like a remix of "Hold On." This collection gets the nod over 1999's Best of En Vogue because it has a sharper selection of songs that really make a good case for their gifts. It may have benefited from fewer songs, since it would be a better listen if it was nothing but their ten best songs, but it still offers the best encapsulation of their talents imaginable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released March 20, 1992 | Rhino Atlantic

The 1990s were a time when hip-hop infused with R&B became pop music, and at the forefront of this movement was En Vogue. Their most commercially and critically successful album, Funky Divas, stands as one of the best pop/R&B albums to emerge from that time, incorporating soul, hip-hop, pop, dance, and rock to create one of the era's most diverse, dazzling, and exciting pieces of work. The album, which is basically free of filler, scored no less than five hit singles, three of which became Top Ten pop hits. Additionally, several other album tracks became dance hits and received considerable airplay as well. These include the unstoppable "My Lovin' (You're Never Gonna Get It)," which combined perfect harmonies, street sass, and 1990s female assertion to create one of the biggest hits of 1992, as well as a catch phrase which became ubiquitous in popular culture. Other hits include their sophisticated, shimmering Top Ten remake of "Giving Him Something He Can Feel," a ghetto love fable initially popularized by Aretha Franklin, the doo wop good-feelin' "Give It Up Turn It Loose," the jazzy "Love Don't Love You," and the hard rock smash "Free Your Mind." The last was a hit which, following the summer of the Los Angeles riots, struck a chord with national audiences by coaxing people to let down their guards about racism and prejudice. Other highlights include the great opener "This Is Your Life," the hip-hop tracks "Hip Hop Lover" and "It Ain't Over Till the Fat Lady Sings," the house track "What Is Love," the sexy, Middle Eastern-influenced "Desire," and their wonderful, should-have-been-a-hit version of Curtis Mayfield's "Hooked on Your Love." Combining sass, elegance, and class with amazing vocals and perfect production, this delightful set stands as one of the 1990s definitive pop albums. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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EV3

Pop - Released June 6, 1997 | Atlantic Records

The sound of En Vogue isn't greatly affected by the departure of Dawn Robinson for their third album, EV3, since the group's harmonies remain remarkably supple and soulful. Instead, the group are hurt by its selection of producers and songwriters. En Vogue have decided to work with Denzil Foster and Thomas McElroy only occasionally on EV3, choosing to hire such professional songwriters and producers as Babyface, David Foster, Diane Warren and Ivan Matias, who arranged their hit single "Don't Let Go (Love)." At times, these pairings work: Babyface's "Whatever" is funkier than his previous work, and Matias brings a gospel-drenched sensibility to his songs. In the cases of Warren and Foster, they reshape En Vogue as an adult contemporary band, sapping the group of any of their energy or style. Still, there are enough strong moments scattered throughout the album to make it worth the wait. © Leo Stanley /TiVo
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R&B/Soul - Released May 12, 2000 | EastWest America

Whether it was caused by Dawn Robinson's absence or the questionable manipulations of their production team, En Vogue's first release as a trio, EV3, was a disappointment. Masterpiece Theatre, their second album since Robinson's departure, shows the group in much finer form. The silky-smooth harmonies are still there, combined with forceful solos and sassy and intelligent lyrics. "Love U Crazay" and "Those Dogs" both explore the liabilities of love in an aggressively funny way, set to famous classical music melodies, while still keeping funky R&B flavors. More traditional love songs pepper the rest of the album, but throughout, Masterpiece Theatre manages to accomplish what few albums do -- being clever and classy at the same time. © Stacia Proefrock /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 6, 2018 | eOne Music

Booklet
Despite multiple lawsuits and fluctuating lineups during a 14-year between-albums gap -- a period during which the original quartet was temporarily intact -- En Vogue recorded Electric Café as the same trio that made Soul Flower. The creative rapport shared by Cindy Herron, Terry Ellis, and Rhona Bennett remains unchanged here on the sixth En Vogue full-length, a whimsical yet surprisingly steady collection of material that continuously switches eras and styles with positive energy beaming all the way through it. The six songs the singers co-wrote with their architects and career-long collaborators, Thomas McElroy and Denzil Foster, are the most adventurous. These include "Electric Café" itself, a strutting, coolly detached new wave-styled number that rhythmically resembles the Romantics more than the Kraftwerk song of the same title. The galloping "Life" incorporates some dubstep trickery, and "Love the Way" is high-gloss dance-pop only tenuously connected to disco, but they're both full songs at the core, with the second one highlighted by the women at their Emotions-like harmonizing best. They recall the Hutchinson sisters again on the Kid Monroe-produced soul-funk throwback "Have a Seat," featuring a compatible if inessential verse from Snoop Dogg. The other big-name collaborators are Ne-Yo, who co-writes the coasting bliss-out "Rocket," and Raphael Saadiq, who teamed with Taura Stinson to write "I'm Good," a loosely funky backdrop for primping before a celebratory night out. Going strictly by the unfussy ease with which this enjoyable album seems to have been knocked out, one wouldn't know that the group's status was ever in doubt. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 14, 2009 | Rhino - Elektra

The '80s produced countless "three girl and a drum machine"-type acts, but 1990 produced the trendsetting quartet En Vogue (courtesy of producers Thomas McElroy and Denzil Foster), who, with their individual vocal skills, sophisticated sense of fashion, sultry videos, and smart singles, went on to become one of the decade's most successful and influential acts. The album that started it all was Born to Sing, which scored two pop hits and two more R&B hits. First and foremost is "Hold On," a cool, shuffling, timeless hip-hop R&B track which peaked at number two on the pop charts and showcased the girls' effortless harmonies. "Lies," which alternated lead vocalists (and featured a rap courtesy of Debbie T.), managed to crack the Top 40 while proving that all members of the quartet were equally adept at handling lead vocals. The biting "You Don't Have to Worry" and the sensual "Don't Go" both scored high on the R&B charts without becoming pop hits. Other highlights include the funky new jill swing track "Strange" and their one-minute version of "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" (which should have been a full-length recording). There are a couple of duds, including "Part of Me," "Just Can't Stay Away," and the CD bonus track, "Waitin' on You," but overall this album is a winner, and was just a preview of the massive success they would achieve with 1992's Funky Divas. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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R&B - Released October 20, 2009 | Elektra Records

En Vogue did make some fine albums, but they always shone on singles. As a matter of fact, the best of their hits -- "My Lovin' (You're Never Gonna Get It)," "Whatta Man," "Runaway Love," "Free Your Mind," "Hold On," "Don't Let Go (Love)" -- were among the very best singles of the '90s, regardless of genre. That's why The Best of En Vogue is such a welcome addition to their catalog. Serious and casual fans alike will find this 14-track collection a captivating listen, since there's a certain intoxicating thrill in hearing each great single flow into the next. It can be argued that the high quality of the material makes this En Vogue's best record, but at the very least, The Best of En Vogue is a dynamite, definitive compilation. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released September 10, 1993 | Atlantic Records

Runaway Love was a stopgap EP released after the major success of Funky Divas. Apart from the great title track, there is little in this collection of filler and remixes of interest to anyone but dedicated fans. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 3, 1990 | Rhino Atlantic

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The '80s produced countless "three girl and a drum machine"-type acts, but 1990 produced the trendsetting quartet En Vogue (courtesy of producers Thomas McElroy and Denzil Foster), who, with their individual vocal skills, sophisticated sense of fashion, sultry videos, and smart singles, went on to become one of the decade's most successful and influential acts. The album that started it all was Born to Sing, which scored two pop hits and two more R&B hits. First and foremost is "Hold On," a cool, shuffling, timeless hip-hop R&B track which peaked at number two on the pop charts and showcased the girls' effortless harmonies. "Lies," which alternated lead vocalists (and featured a rap courtesy of Debbie T.), managed to crack the Top 40 while proving that all members of the quartet were equally adept at handling lead vocals. The biting "You Don't Have to Worry" and the sensual "Don't Go" both scored high on the R&B charts without becoming pop hits. Other highlights include the funky new jill swing track "Strange" and their one-minute version of "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" (which should have been a full-length recording). There are a couple of duds, including "Part of Me," "Just Can't Stay Away," and the CD bonus track, "Waitin' on You," but overall this album is a winner, and was just a preview of the massive success they would achieve with 1992's Funky Divas. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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R&B - Released December 1, 2017 | eOne Music

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R&B - Released November 17, 2017 | eOne Music

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R&B - Released April 26, 2018 | eOne Music

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R&B - Released March 17, 2020 | Rhino Atlantic

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Miscellaneous - Released January 1, 2002 | Discretion Entertainment, LLC.

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Pop - Released April 14, 2015 | Rufftown Entertainment

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R&B - Released May 3, 2017 | eOne Music

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Pop - Released July 7, 2009 | Rhino - Elektra

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R&B - Released January 29, 2007 | Rhino - Elektra

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R&B - Released November 12, 1991 | Atlantic Records

Combining classic and robust girl group harmonies with elements of high-tech funk and hip-hop, En Vogue has been one of the most distinctive and appealing R&B acts of the 1990s. One can make all kinds of comparisons -- the Shirelles, Martha & the Vandellas, Honey Cone, First Choice -- but there's no denying that En Vogue has a richly appealing sound all its own. The Oakland quartet had taken the R&B world by storm in 1991, when East West sought to cash in on the success of its debut album, Born to Sing, with this generally enjoyable, though not essential, collection of remixes. While all of the songs themselves are superb, the remixes (done by house music heroes Frankie Knuckles and Steve "Silk" Hurley and hip-hop producer Marley Marl, among others) range from inspired to pedestrian. "Strange" and "You Don't Have to Worry" take on a whole new life in a house setting, whereas Marl's remix of "Hold On" is a disappointment, relying on one tired hip-hop cliché after another. Interestingly, East West classifies this CD (which is primarily for hardcore fans) as an EP, although it's about as long as a vinyl LP. © Alex Henderson /TiVo