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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

Empire of the Sun's debut offering of experimental electro-pop and dance-rock is very well-timed, hitting the market just as the buzz surrounding MGMT's Oracular Spectacular has started to recede. Like those similarly colorful Americans, Empire of the Sun's two members embrace the glam lifestyle in spirit and song, wearing festive costumes in concert and festooning their music with oddball flourishes, androgynous lyrics, and a general sense of theatricality that borders on schizophrenia. Walking on a Dream runs an interesting gamut, sampling equally from hip-hop ("Swordfish Hotkiss Night"), arty synth pop ("Standing on the Shore"), and all the stops in between. With its programmed percussion and futuristic keyboards, the music sounds slightly more indebted to Pnau than the Sleepy Jackson; nevertheless, Luke Steele (the brains behind the latter band) takes center stage on the bulk of these songs, speak-singing in a childish tenor one minute and cooing like a lovestruck female the next. The aforementioned MGMT followed a similar path with their own debut -- a fact that simply cannot be emphasized enough, given the vast similarities between both records -- but while MGMT took cues from the likes of David Bowie and Prince, Empire of the Sun's fusion is more reminiscent of worldbeat and fantasy movie soundtracks. The outlandish cover art follows suit, as Steele and Nick Littlemore (dressed up in bizarre Star Wars-styled regalia) are flanked by a decorative elephant, a tiger, and what appears to be the skyline of Atlantis. Like the music it promotes, the cover art is purposely ludicrous, but listeners who have a palette for such whimsy should walk away happy. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 10, 2017 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

After experiencing a worldwide hit with the title track of their 2009 album, Walking on a Dream, Empire of the Sun did the sensible thing and made a follow-up album that capitalizes on the glossy, sunny pop of that song. Instead of exploring some of the more esoteric avenues they started down on their debut, on Ice on the Dune the duo of Nick Littlemore and Luke Steele focus with laser-sharp intensity on creating an album that is 110 percent POP with no sharp edges and all glittering sunshine, blown out to gigantic proportions. In less skilled hands, such a tactic could lead to an over-produced trinket that's good for maybe half a listen and then gets tossed aside. Instead, Ice on the Dune ends up being everything a good modern pop record should be, and then some. The songs have super-sharp choruses, incessantly listenable arrangements built on acoustic, electric, and programmed instruments, and icy-cold but immediate beats, sometimes sounding like Katy Perry produced by Jeff Lynne, sometimes sounding like ELO produced by Katy Perry. Everything feels like a radio hit; everything feels custom made for listeners who like the sound of modern pop but are put off by the surfacy distractions that come along with it. Here you only have to deal with crazy headgear (check the cover) and the OTT ballad that ends the album in an overwrought splash of powdery tears. Otherwise, it's all perfectly crafted songs that draw on disco influences ("Old Flavours"), soft rock ("Ice on the Dune"), throbbing Madonna-inspired club jams ("Celebrate"), and Daft Punk ("Awakening"), along with a couple that give "Walking on a Dream" a fair run in the catchiness stakes ("Alive" and the incredibly bouncy and fun "Surround Sound"). Too many times having a big hit can send a group off the rails as it pursues the spotlight and tries to catch lightning again. The guys in Empire of the Sun manage to not only catch the lightning again, but their skill at crafting perfect pop, the depth in their songs, and the emotion their voices transmit make this record better than one might have ever expected. Modern pop doesn't get any better than this. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Dance - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 3, 2008 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

Empire of the Sun's debut offering of experimental electro-pop and dance-rock is very well-timed, hitting the market just as the buzz surrounding MGMT's Oracular Spectacular has started to recede. Like those similarly colorful Americans, Empire of the Sun's two members embrace the glam lifestyle in spirit and song, wearing festive costumes in concert and festooning their music with oddball flourishes, androgynous lyrics, and a general sense of theatricality that borders on schizophrenia. Walking on a Dream runs an interesting gamut, sampling equally from hip-hop ("Swordfish Hotkiss Night"), arty synth pop ("Standing on the Shore"), and all the stops in between. With its programmed percussion and futuristic keyboards, the music sounds slightly more indebted to Pnau than the Sleepy Jackson; nevertheless, Luke Steele (the brains behind the latter band) takes center stage on the bulk of these songs, speak-singing in a childish tenor one minute and cooing like a lovestruck female the next. The aforementioned MGMT followed a similar path with their own debut -- a fact that simply cannot be emphasized enough, given the vast similarities between both records -- but while MGMT took cues from the likes of David Bowie and Prince, Empire of the Sun's fusion is more reminiscent of worldbeat and fantasy movie soundtracks. The outlandish cover art follows suit, as Steele and Nick Littlemore (dressed up in bizarre Star Wars-styled regalia) are flanked by a decorative elephant, a tiger, and what appears to be the skyline of Atlantis. Like the music it promotes, the cover art is purposely ludicrous, but listeners who have a palette for such whimsy should walk away happy. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2016 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

By the time many bands get to their third album, they decide it's time to change the formula that got them that far, adding or subtracting this or that until they basically ruin everything. Empire of the Sun don't do anything like that on their third album, Two Vines. Luke Steele and Nick Littlemore seem content to ride their shiny, helium-filled pop balloon until it floats straight into the sun, exploding in ribbons of sparkling melodies, gleaming synths, percolating beats, and man-machine vocals. Almost nothing has changed since the brilliant 2013 album Ice on the Dune -- maybe it's a little warmer and less disco-fied, but it's just as expansive and unabashedly welcoming. The duo concoct music that sounds like a giant hug, sweet and smooth with a powerfully beating heart. They layer banks of keys, electric pianos, vibraphones, chiming guitars, and miles of vocal harmonies like painters, then place Steele's soaring vocals on top like a whimsical, mystical cherry. It's a formula that needs no alterations to sound like the best pop music imaginable in the 2010s. This time out, the songs are a little more balanced. While every song sounds like it could be a hit single, there are no songs that stand out as much as "Walking on a Dream" or "Alive." The record flows like a technicolor river from one sophisticated pop gem to the next, pausing only for the occasional moment that peeks its head above the current and quietly demands some extra attention. The slippery smooth '80s ballad "First Crush" is one of those times, as the duo strip back the arrangement just a little to give the song extra room to breathe. "To Her Door" is another. It features Lindsey Buckingham's gently picked guitar and iconic backing vocals, giving the song some real soft rock legitimacy and ending the album on a high note. Two Vines may not be the group's masterpiece, but it is their most consistent album yet. Their mastery of modern pop sounds, ability to craft melodies that have a timeless quality, and the real connection they provide to people who want their frivolous pop music to have some depth and meaning, is impressive. So many bands who try this sound chilly and calculating, but on Two Vines, Empire of the Sun sound the way sunshine feels, warm and enveloping. Hopefully that will never change no matter how many albums they make. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 1, 2019 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

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Pop - Released February 23, 2009 | CAPITOL

Empire of the Sun's debut offering of experimental electro-pop and dance-rock is very well-timed, hitting the market just as the buzz surrounding MGMT's Oracular Spectacular has started to recede. Like those similarly colorful Americans, Empire of the Sun's two members embrace the glam lifestyle in spirit and song, wearing festive costumes in concert and festooning their music with oddball flourishes, androgynous lyrics, and a general sense of theatricality that borders on schizophrenia. Walking on a Dream runs an interesting gamut, sampling equally from hip-hop ("Swordfish Hotkiss Night"), arty synth pop ("Standing on the Shore"), and all the stops in between. With its programmed percussion and futuristic keyboards, the music sounds slightly more indebted to Pnau than the Sleepy Jackson; nevertheless, Luke Steele (the brains behind the latter band) takes center stage on the bulk of these songs, speak-singing in a childish tenor one minute and cooing like a lovestruck female the next. The aforementioned MGMT followed a similar path with their own debut -- a fact that simply cannot be emphasized enough, given the vast similarities between both records -- but while MGMT took cues from the likes of David Bowie and Prince, Empire of the Sun's fusion is more reminiscent of worldbeat and fantasy movie soundtracks. The outlandish cover art follows suit, as Steele and Nick Littlemore (dressed up in bizarre Star Wars-styled regalia) are flanked by a decorative elephant, a tiger, and what appears to be the skyline of Atlantis. Like the music it promotes, the cover art is purposely ludicrous, but listeners who have a palette for such whimsy should walk away happy. © Andrew Leahey /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2016 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

By the time many bands get to their third album, they decide it's time to change the formula that got them that far, adding or subtracting this or that until they basically ruin everything. Empire of the Sun don't do anything like that on their third album, Two Vines. Luke Steele and Nick Littlemore seem content to ride their shiny, helium-filled pop balloon until it floats straight into the sun, exploding in ribbons of sparkling melodies, gleaming synths, percolating beats, and man-machine vocals. Almost nothing has changed since the brilliant 2013 album Ice on the Dune -- maybe it's a little warmer and less disco-fied, but it's just as expansive and unabashedly welcoming. The duo concoct music that sounds like a giant hug, sweet and smooth with a powerfully beating heart. They layer banks of keys, electric pianos, vibraphones, chiming guitars, and miles of vocal harmonies like painters, then place Steele's soaring vocals on top like a whimsical, mystical cherry. It's a formula that needs no alterations to sound like the best pop music imaginable in the 2010s. This time out, the songs are a little more balanced. While every song sounds like it could be a hit single, there are no songs that stand out as much as "Walking on a Dream" or "Alive." The record flows like a technicolor river from one sophisticated pop gem to the next, pausing only for the occasional moment that peeks its head above the current and quietly demands some extra attention. The slippery smooth '80s ballad "First Crush" is one of those times, as the duo strip back the arrangement just a little to give the song extra room to breathe. "To Her Door" is another. It features Lindsey Buckingham's gently picked guitar and iconic backing vocals, giving the song some real soft rock legitimacy and ending the album on a high note. Two Vines may not be the group's masterpiece, but it is their most consistent album yet. Their mastery of modern pop sounds, ability to craft melodies that have a timeless quality, and the real connection they provide to people who want their frivolous pop music to have some depth and meaning, is impressive. So many bands who try this sound chilly and calculating, but on Two Vines, Empire of the Sun sound the way sunshine feels, warm and enveloping. Hopefully that will never change no matter how many albums they make. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2009 | Virgin Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2008 | Capitol Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 25, 2016 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | CAPITOL

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 27, 2016 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2014 | CAPITOL

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 4, 2016 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

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Dance - Released January 1, 2013 | EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2009 | Astralwerks

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2009 | Astralwerks