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Country - Released February 26, 2013 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio - Stereophile: Recording of the Month
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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
While Emmylou Harris spent much of her career carrying on the legacy of Gram Parsons, Elite Hotel ranks among her most overt tributes to his genius, thanks to its covers of the Flying Burrito Brothers' "Sin City" and "Wheels," along with "Ooh Las Vegas" from the Grievous Angel album. In addition to the usual eclectic mix of covers -- which includes the Beatles' "Here, There and Everywhere" and Hank Williams' "Jambalaya" this time out -- Elite Hotel offers renditions of the country perennials "Together Again" and "Sweet Dreams," which were, respectively, Harris' first two number one chart hits. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Emmylou Harris' major-label solo debut quickly establishes the pattern that the vast majority of her subsequent work would follow: Pieces of the Sky is bravely eclectic, impeccably performed, and achingly beautiful. Amid a collection of songs that ranks among her most well-chosen -- ranging from the catalogs of the Beatles ("For No One") to Boudleaux and Felice Bryant ("Sleepless Nights") and the Louvin Brothers (the hit "If I Could Only Win Your Love") -- the record's centerpiece is one of Harris' rare original compositions, "Boulder to Birmingham," her stirring tribute to fallen mentor Gram Parsons. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Country - Released July 16, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Combining acoustic bluegrass with traditional Appalachian melodies (and tossing one contemporary tune, Paul Simon's "The Boxer," into the mix), Roses in the Snow ranks among Emmylou Harris' riskiest -- and most satisfying -- gambits. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Pop - Released February 25, 2003 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Rhino Records asked producer Brian Ahern to select his favorite tracks from the Emmylou Harris albums he helmed -- he produced her first 11 studio offerings for Reprise Records. That's quite a daunting task when you consider that some of those recordings were Elite Hotel, Luxury Liner, Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town, and Pieces of the Sky, just to name a few. But Ahern rose to the task and put together a solid, aesthetically perfect set here, highlighting many different aspects of Harris' career at the time: from her trademark, utterly pure singing voice, to her song selection, to the sound of her band and the studio she recorded in, this is a top-notch set from start to finish and serves as an excellent introduction to her early work for the newcomer. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released February 22, 2013 | Nonesuch

Distinctions Stereophile: Recording of the Month
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Country - Released June 1, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

For all country enthusiasts, 1973 left a permanent and deep scar, with the death of Gram Parsons. Emmylou Harris lost a friend, a mentor, an inspiration and the person with whom she shared her life. Twelve years later, she released the flagship album of her career, and one of her favourites, The Ballad Of Sally Rose, that is now being reedited in a double-disc special edition, with one of them featuring ten demos. Among these, a legendary version of The Sweetheart Of The Rodeo and White Line. This album is even more surprising as it is one of the rare that was written or co-written in its entirety by Emmylou. Sally Rose, that’s her! Her stage name on tour, to be exact. The main inspiration obviously remains her relationship with Gram Parsons. She strolls between fictitious and genuine memories, her love for the stage and of course her pronounced taste for American music. In Diamond In My Crown, or Heart To Heart, the pinnacle of all ballads, her angelic voice shines through, just like her ability to combine lyricism and acoustic guitar. We’re left wondering if she can in fact communicate with the afterlife. And then the rhythm picks up, unsurprisingly followed by a rocking country. On Rhythm Guitar, she is accompanied on the guitar by Waylon Jennings, and her long-time collaborators Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt on vocals. The atmosphere is all of a sudden much more eighties. And the ease, with which Emmylou Harris is able to dive into her intense and deep singing to emerge with beautiful bass on a fully assumed country music, makes us want to wear boots and go to a Grand Ole Opry concert! © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Pop - Released April 7, 2014 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet
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Country - Released July 18, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Country - Released May 8, 2015 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet
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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Luxury Liner ranks as Emmylou Harris' best-selling solo record to date, and it's one of her most engaging efforts as well; her Hot Band is in peak form, and the songs are even more far afield than usual, including Chuck Berry's "(You Never Can Tell) C'est la Vie" and Townes Van Zandt's painterly tale of aging outlaws, "Pancho & Lefty." ~ Jason Ankeny
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Pop - Released June 6, 2008 | Nonesuch

Booklet
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Country - Released April 20, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Rhino's double-disc Anthology concentrates on Emmylou Harris' Reprise recordings, which is a blessing. Once she left Reprise, she started to delve into "experimental," "atmospheric" recordings a bit too heavily, certainly more than her prior recordings would justify, and it almost obscured her purest talents -- that of a singer that carried on the tradition of, say, Patsy Cline, becoming the greatest country singer of her generation. Since her generation was the rock generation, her path crossed multiple times with singers that weren't strictly country, most notably at the beginning of her career, when she sung backing and harmony vocals for the incomparable Gram Parsons. This gave her exposure, and she capitalized upon it by turning in recordings that simultaneously appealed to rock and country artists, finding herself as a tremendous interpretive singer, somebody that perfectly balanced the divide between classic and contemporary. Rhino's double-disc Anthology perfectly captures that balance and if it has any faults, it's that it illustrates her career a little too well, finding that her classicist approach was as modern as it was reverent. So, there are moments here that seem a little too studied to be true, but that's an accurate representation of her career, illustrating how she walked the tightrope between genuine country and a scholarly interpretation of it. This will appeal to both factions, as it captures both sides of her personality equally well. That means it might not be the perfect choice to convert doubters, yet it still winds up representing Harris' career remarkably well, perhaps being the one disc for casual fans. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released October 6, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Given how long and fruitful her career has been, and the scope of this collection -- an overview of her 1970s offerings -- Profile should no longer be subtitled Best of Emmylou Harris. That said, this is a weighty compilation of very important material that provides a solid introduction to the beginnings of one of America's most important and consistent recordings artists, a woman who has stretched not only country music -- whether Nash Vegas admits it or not -- but pop and rock as well. This material was recorded while Harris was still a "country" artist proper. Her readings of Don Gibson's "Sweet Dreams" (a gutsy tune to take on with your first record), the Louvins' "If I Could Win Your Love," Dolly Parton's "To Daddy," Buck Owens' "Together Again," A.P. Carter's "Hello Stranger," and Billy Sherrill's "Too Far Gone" established her in the genre as a traditionalist who understood countrypolitan as well. However, this collection also reveals her mastery of the different periods and regions of the music. More interesting and compelling is her version of Delbert McClinton's "Two More Bottles of Wine," which made an R&B tune into a country song, and "Boulder to Birmingham," a song she co-wrote with Bill Danoff that straddles Woody Guthrie's American folk music and a newly emerging country music. The only shortcoming of this collection is that it fails to showcase the newer material she had been working on during these years. For instance, there are no Rodney Crowell tunes present. ~ Thom Jurek
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Pop - Released October 24, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

On the heels of Trio, Emmylou Harris' smash studio collaboration with Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt, comes the compilation Duets, which collects previously released performances recorded in conjunction with Neil Young, Willie Nelson and others. Obviously intended to cash in on the success of Trio, the record is by no means an essential addition to the Harris oeuvre: virtually everything included is readily available on other albums, and the selections are erratic at best. By and large, Harris' finest material is her solo work, although the power of "Love Hurts," recorded during her all-too-brief period with Gram Parsons, remains undeniable. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Pop - Released November 4, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released September 1, 2000 | Nonesuch

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Country - Released February 12, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town is a transitional effort that bridges the curveballs of Emmylou Harris' earliest solo work with the more traditional country albums that comprise the bulk of the second phase of her career. For the first time, she covers no Gram Parsons tunes or pop music chestnuts, relying instead on newly exited Hot Band member Rodney Crowell for two songs ("Leaving Louisiana in the Broad Daylight" and "I Ain't Living Long Like This") and Dolly Parton for another (the devastating "To Daddy"); the highlight is a gorgeous cover of Jesse Winchester's "Defying Gravity." ~ Jason Ankeny
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Pop - Released November 4, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released September 22, 2003 | Nonesuch

There's something just the slightest bit comic about calling an Emmylou Harris album Stumble into Grace. While Harris has always sounded as if both earthly and spiritual grace were created with her in mind, when she sings, it seems she can no more stumble than a dolphin can be taught to walk on dry land. Stumble into Grace finds Harris following in the same creative path she began to pursue with Wrecking Ball and Red Dirt Girl, which is to say that the influence of her country-influenced material is more felt than heard as she dips her toes into the spectral and atmospheric accents of folk, indie pop, and world music. While Harris has long been just as interested in nuance and blank spaces as the notes of her songs, producer Malcolm Burn (who also collaborated with her on Red Dirt Girl) knows what to make of the purposefully spare surfaces of these new songs (which, again, like Red Dirt Girl, were, for the most part, written by Harris herself), and the results are splendid. Part of the revelation of Wrecking Ball and Red Dirt Girl was hearing Harris moving in a startling new direction, and while Stumble into Grace seems less novel in the context of its immediate predecessors, the bitter clarity of "Time in Babylon," the gentle but energetic textures of "Little Bird," and the funky shuffle of "Jupiter Rising" confirm that she hasn't run out of new avenues to explore. After three decades as a world-class talent, what's most heartening is that Harris is not only making some of the finest music of her career at a time when many artists would be treading water, but she's delightfully confounding expectations at the same time. Stumble into Grace shows she's still playing at the top of her game. ~ Mark Deming