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Country - Released February 26, 2013 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio - Stereophile: Recording of the Month
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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Emmylou Harris' major-label solo debut quickly establishes the pattern that the vast majority of her subsequent work would follow: Pieces of the Sky is bravely eclectic, impeccably performed, and achingly beautiful. Amid a collection of songs that ranks among her most well-chosen -- ranging from the catalogs of the Beatles ("For No One") to Boudleaux and Felice Bryant ("Sleepless Nights") and the Louvin Brothers (the hit "If I Could Only Win Your Love") -- the record's centerpiece is one of Harris' rare original compositions, "Boulder to Birmingham," her stirring tribute to fallen mentor Gram Parsons. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 25, 2003 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rhino Records asked producer Brian Ahern to select his favorite tracks from the Emmylou Harris albums he helmed -- he produced her first 11 studio offerings for Reprise Records. That's quite a daunting task when you consider that some of those recordings were Elite Hotel, Luxury Liner, Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town, and Pieces of the Sky, just to name a few. But Ahern rose to the task and put together a solid, aesthetically perfect set here, highlighting many different aspects of Harris' career at the time: from her trademark, utterly pure singing voice, to her song selection, to the sound of her band and the studio she recorded in, this is a top-notch set from start to finish and serves as an excellent introduction to her early work for the newcomer. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Country - Released July 16, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Combining acoustic bluegrass with traditional Appalachian melodies (and tossing one contemporary tune, Paul Simon's "The Boxer," into the mix), Roses in the Snow ranks among Emmylou Harris' riskiest -- and most satisfying -- gambits. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
While Emmylou Harris spent much of her career carrying on the legacy of Gram Parsons, Elite Hotel ranks among her most overt tributes to his genius, thanks to its covers of the Flying Burrito Brothers' "Sin City" and "Wheels," along with "Ooh Las Vegas" from the Grievous Angel album. In addition to the usual eclectic mix of covers -- which includes the Beatles' "Here, There and Everywhere" and Hank Williams' "Jambalaya" this time out -- Elite Hotel offers renditions of the country perennials "Together Again" and "Sweet Dreams," which were, respectively, Harris' first two number one chart hits. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Country - Released February 22, 2013 | Nonesuch

Distinctions Stereophile: Recording of the Month
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Pop - Released September 26, 1995 | Nonesuch

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Pop - Released November 4, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Country - Released January 14, 1985 | Rhino - Warner Records

For all country enthusiasts, 1973 left a permanent and deep scar, with the death of Gram Parsons. Emmylou Harris lost a friend, a mentor, an inspiration and the person with whom she shared her life. Twelve years later, she released the flagship album of her career, and one of her favourites, The Ballad Of Sally Rose, that is now being reedited in a double-disc special edition, with one of them featuring ten demos. Among these, a legendary version of The Sweetheart Of The Rodeo and White Line. This album is even more surprising as it is one of the rare that was written or co-written in its entirety by Emmylou. Sally Rose, that’s her! Her stage name on tour, to be exact. The main inspiration obviously remains her relationship with Gram Parsons. She strolls between fictitious and genuine memories, her love for the stage and of course her pronounced taste for American music. In Diamond In My Crown, or Heart To Heart, the pinnacle of all ballads, her angelic voice shines through, just like her ability to combine lyricism and acoustic guitar. We’re left wondering if she can in fact communicate with the afterlife. And then the rhythm picks up, unsurprisingly followed by a rocking country. On Rhythm Guitar, she is accompanied on the guitar by Waylon Jennings, and her long-time collaborators Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt on vocals. The atmosphere is all of a sudden much more eighties. And the ease, with which Emmylou Harris is able to dive into her intense and deep singing to emerge with beautiful bass on a fully assumed country music, makes us want to wear boots and go to a Grand Ole Opry concert! © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Pop - Released September 26, 1995 | Nonesuch

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Wrecking Ball is a leftfield masterpiece, the most wide-ranging, innovative, and daring record in a career built on such notions. Rich in atmosphere and haunting in its dark complexity, much of the due credit belongs to producer Daniel Lanois; best known for his work with pop superstars like U2 and Peter Gabriel, on Wrecking Ball Lanois taps into the very essence of what makes Harris tick -- the gossamer vocals, the flawless phrasing -- while also opening up innumerable new avenues for her talents to explore. The songs shimmer and swirl, given life through Lanois' trademark ringing guitar textures and the almost primal drumming of U2's Larry Mullen, Jr. The fixed point remains Harris' voice, which leaps into each and every one of these diverse compositions -- culled from the pens of Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Steve Earle, and others -- with utter fearlessness, as if this were the album she'd been waiting her entire life to make. Maybe it is. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Country - Released May 8, 2015 | Nonesuch

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Country - Released July 18, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released September 1, 2000 | Nonesuch

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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Records

Luxury Liner ranks as Emmylou Harris' best-selling solo record to date, and it's one of her most engaging efforts as well; her Hot Band is in peak form, and the songs are even more far afield than usual, including Chuck Berry's "(You Never Can Tell) C'est la Vie" and Townes Van Zandt's painterly tale of aging outlaws, "Pancho & Lefty." © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Country - Released April 20, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Records

Rhino's double-disc Anthology concentrates on Emmylou Harris' Reprise recordings, which is a blessing. Once she left Reprise, she started to delve into "experimental," "atmospheric" recordings a bit too heavily, certainly more than her prior recordings would justify, and it almost obscured her purest talents -- that of a singer that carried on the tradition of, say, Patsy Cline, becoming the greatest country singer of her generation. Since her generation was the rock generation, her path crossed multiple times with singers that weren't strictly country, most notably at the beginning of her career, when she sung backing and harmony vocals for the incomparable Gram Parsons. This gave her exposure, and she capitalized upon it by turning in recordings that simultaneously appealed to rock and country artists, finding herself as a tremendous interpretive singer, somebody that perfectly balanced the divide between classic and contemporary. Rhino's double-disc Anthology perfectly captures that balance and if it has any faults, it's that it illustrates her career a little too well, finding that her classicist approach was as modern as it was reverent. So, there are moments here that seem a little too studied to be true, but that's an accurate representation of her career, illustrating how she walked the tightrope between genuine country and a scholarly interpretation of it. This will appeal to both factions, as it captures both sides of her personality equally well. That means it might not be the perfect choice to convert doubters, yet it still winds up representing Harris' career remarkably well, perhaps being the one disc for casual fans. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 6, 2008 | Nonesuch

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Pop - Released October 24, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

On the heels of Trio, Emmylou Harris' smash studio collaboration with Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt, comes the compilation Duets, which collects previously released performances recorded in conjunction with Neil Young, Willie Nelson and others. Obviously intended to cash in on the success of Trio, the record is by no means an essential addition to the Harris oeuvre: virtually everything included is readily available on other albums, and the selections are erratic at best. By and large, Harris' finest material is her solo work, although the power of "Love Hurts," recorded during her all-too-brief period with Gram Parsons, remains undeniable. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 7, 1993 | Warner Records - Nashville

Cowgirl's Prayer, recorded in 1993, was the last album Emmylou Harris recorded before beginning a long association with producer and songwriter Daniel Lanois, creating her band Spyboy, and recording her exit from Elektra with Wrecking Ball. In other words, it was the last "traditional" Emmylou Harris record. Produced by Allen Reynolds and Richard Bennett, it features 11 stellar cuts by songwriters such as Lucinda Williams ("Crescent City"), Leonard Cohen ("Ballad of a Runaway Horse"), David Olney ("Jerusalem Tomorrow"), Kieran Kane ("The Light"), Eddy Arnold (the classic "You Don't Know Me"), and, in a welcome change, Harris herself ("Prayer in Open D"). This is also filled with Nashville session aces as well as Kane; backing vocalists who include Trisha Yearwood, Alison Krauss, and Ashley Cleveland; and famed bassist Edgar Meyer. The Arnold track, Harris' own composition, and her reading of Williams' "Crescent City" are standouts to be sure, in that Harris allows her voice to move deeper into the lyric than the arrangements would normally allow. But it is on Olney's "Jerusalem Tomorrow" that the weight of the album rests, with Al Perkins' whining pedal steel and Sam Levine's clarinet winding their way through the mix. The story involves a charlatan who heals the sick and makes a mute speak, a false prophet who feels his game is being eclipsed by a strange, wandering Galilean who doesn't charge for his works of wonder. When the false prophet encounters Jesus, he decides to go along with his game as long as his way is paid, and prepares to go into Jerusalem the next day. Given that it is spoken and not sung, Harris dislocates her way of conveying emotion in a song; that she becomes convincing as a male figure is another shapeshift, and finally that there is no overly moral tone in her delivery, but strictly one of empathy, opens up not only the song, but Harris and the rest of the album to an entirely different set of critical criteria. Cowgirl's Prayer is one of Harris' most emotionally honest and musically satisfying recordings that matches the intensity, diversity, and musical ambition of her earliest works. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 24, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Country - Released February 12, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Records

Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town is a transitional effort that bridges the curveballs of Emmylou Harris' earliest solo work with the more traditional country albums that comprise the bulk of the second phase of her career. For the first time, she covers no Gram Parsons tunes or pop music chestnuts, relying instead on newly exited Hot Band member Rodney Crowell for two songs ("Leaving Louisiana in the Broad Daylight" and "I Ain't Living Long Like This") and Dolly Parton for another (the devastating "To Daddy"); the highlight is a gorgeous cover of Jesse Winchester's "Defying Gravity." © Jason Ankeny /TiVo