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Country - Released February 26, 2013 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio - Stereophile: Recording of the Month
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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
While Emmylou Harris spent much of her career carrying on the legacy of Gram Parsons, Elite Hotel ranks among her most overt tributes to his genius, thanks to its covers of the Flying Burrito Brothers' "Sin City" and "Wheels," along with "Ooh Las Vegas" from the Grievous Angel album. In addition to the usual eclectic mix of covers -- which includes the Beatles' "Here, There and Everywhere" and Hank Williams' "Jambalaya" this time out -- Elite Hotel offers renditions of the country perennials "Together Again" and "Sweet Dreams," which were, respectively, Harris' first two number one chart hits. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Pop - Released February 25, 2003 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Rhino Records asked producer Brian Ahern to select his favorite tracks from the Emmylou Harris albums he helmed -- he produced her first 11 studio offerings for Reprise Records. That's quite a daunting task when you consider that some of those recordings were Elite Hotel, Luxury Liner, Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town, and Pieces of the Sky, just to name a few. But Ahern rose to the task and put together a solid, aesthetically perfect set here, highlighting many different aspects of Harris' career at the time: from her trademark, utterly pure singing voice, to her song selection, to the sound of her band and the studio she recorded in, this is a top-notch set from start to finish and serves as an excellent introduction to her early work for the newcomer. ~ Thom Jurek
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Country - Released July 16, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Combining acoustic bluegrass with traditional Appalachian melodies (and tossing one contemporary tune, Paul Simon's "The Boxer," into the mix), Roses in the Snow ranks among Emmylou Harris' riskiest -- and most satisfying -- gambits. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Emmylou Harris' major-label solo debut quickly establishes the pattern that the vast majority of her subsequent work would follow: Pieces of the Sky is bravely eclectic, impeccably performed, and achingly beautiful. Amid a collection of songs that ranks among her most well-chosen -- ranging from the catalogs of the Beatles ("For No One") to Boudleaux and Felice Bryant ("Sleepless Nights") and the Louvin Brothers (the hit "If I Could Only Win Your Love") -- the record's centerpiece is one of Harris' rare original compositions, "Boulder to Birmingham," her stirring tribute to fallen mentor Gram Parsons. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Country - Released February 22, 2013 | Nonesuch

Distinctions Stereophile: Recording of the Month
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Country - Released June 1, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

For all country enthusiasts, 1973 left a permanent and deep scar, with the death of Gram Parsons. Emmylou Harris lost a friend, a mentor, an inspiration and the person with whom she shared her life. Twelve years later, she released the flagship album of her career, and one of her favourites, The Ballad Of Sally Rose, that is now being reedited in a double-disc special edition, with one of them featuring ten demos. Among these, a legendary version of The Sweetheart Of The Rodeo and White Line. This album is even more surprising as it is one of the rare that was written or co-written in its entirety by Emmylou. Sally Rose, that’s her! Her stage name on tour, to be exact. The main inspiration obviously remains her relationship with Gram Parsons. She strolls between fictitious and genuine memories, her love for the stage and of course her pronounced taste for American music. In Diamond In My Crown, or Heart To Heart, the pinnacle of all ballads, her angelic voice shines through, just like her ability to combine lyricism and acoustic guitar. We’re left wondering if she can in fact communicate with the afterlife. And then the rhythm picks up, unsurprisingly followed by a rocking country. On Rhythm Guitar, she is accompanied on the guitar by Waylon Jennings, and her long-time collaborators Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt on vocals. The atmosphere is all of a sudden much more eighties. And the ease, with which Emmylou Harris is able to dive into her intense and deep singing to emerge with beautiful bass on a fully assumed country music, makes us want to wear boots and go to a Grand Ole Opry concert! © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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Pop - Released April 7, 2014 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet
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Country - Released July 18, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Country - Released May 8, 2015 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet
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Country - Released February 24, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Luxury Liner ranks as Emmylou Harris' best-selling solo record to date, and it's one of her most engaging efforts as well; her Hot Band is in peak form, and the songs are even more far afield than usual, including Chuck Berry's "(You Never Can Tell) C'est la Vie" and Townes Van Zandt's painterly tale of aging outlaws, "Pancho & Lefty." ~ Jason Ankeny
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Pop - Released June 6, 2008 | Nonesuch

Booklet
In 1995, Emmylou Harris made a decisive break with her creative past, recording the album Wrecking Ball with producer Daniel Lanois and abandoning the traditional country purity of her best-known work for lovely but spectral musical landscapes and exploring her muse as a songwriter in a way she had never attempted before. After Wrecking Ball, Harris recorded three albums in which she made the most of her new creative freedom and honed her impressive gifts as a songwriter, but All I Intended to Be, her first new release in five years, finds her reaching back toward a sound and style that recall the country and folk influences of her earlier work. But All I Intended to Be is clearly the work of an artist who is looking to the past entirely on her own terms, and with the lessons learned since 1995 clearly audible at all times. All I Intended to Be was produced by Brian Ahern, who was behind the controls for most of her albums of the '70s and '80s, and it features a handful of session players who worked with Harris and Ahern in the past, while Harris' occasional partner in harmony Dolly Parton contributes backing vocals to "Gold" (as does Vince Gill). The album's largely acoustic textures manage to sound both homey and fresh; if the melodies and the arrangements nod politely to traditional country sounds (and hold hands on "Gold"), the space in the production and the unpretentious artfulness of the songs reflect an intelligence and restraint largely absent from country music in the new millennium. Harris wrote or co-wrote six of these 13 songs, leaving more room for covers than on Red Dirt Girl or Stumble into Grace, but the tone of the album is consistent throughout, and she brings a streamlined passion to material by Patty Griffin, Billy Joe Shaver, and Merle Haggard that makes them her own. (Harris also writes and sings several tunes with Kate and Anna McGarrigle in what continues to be a truly inspired collaboration.) And as always, the most memorable thing about All I Intended to Be is Emmylou Harris' voice; there are few singers in any genre with a greater natural skill and better instincts, and as wonderful as these songs are and as fine a band as she and Ahern have on hand, it's her glorious voice that turns these simple materials into gold, and she only improves with the passage of the years. The surfaces of this album may seem less bold than the albums that immediately preceded it, but All I Intended to Be is the work of a consummate artist who is still reaching out to new places even when she points to her creative history. ~ Mark Deming
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Country - Released April 20, 2001 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Rhino's double-disc Anthology concentrates on Emmylou Harris' Reprise recordings, which is a blessing. Once she left Reprise, she started to delve into "experimental," "atmospheric" recordings a bit too heavily, certainly more than her prior recordings would justify, and it almost obscured her purest talents -- that of a singer that carried on the tradition of, say, Patsy Cline, becoming the greatest country singer of her generation. Since her generation was the rock generation, her path crossed multiple times with singers that weren't strictly country, most notably at the beginning of her career, when she sung backing and harmony vocals for the incomparable Gram Parsons. This gave her exposure, and she capitalized upon it by turning in recordings that simultaneously appealed to rock and country artists, finding herself as a tremendous interpretive singer, somebody that perfectly balanced the divide between classic and contemporary. Rhino's double-disc Anthology perfectly captures that balance and if it has any faults, it's that it illustrates her career a little too well, finding that her classicist approach was as modern as it was reverent. So, there are moments here that seem a little too studied to be true, but that's an accurate representation of her career, illustrating how she walked the tightrope between genuine country and a scholarly interpretation of it. This will appeal to both factions, as it captures both sides of her personality equally well. That means it might not be the perfect choice to convert doubters, yet it still winds up representing Harris' career remarkably well, perhaps being the one disc for casual fans. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released October 6, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released September 22, 2003 | Nonesuch

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Pop - Released October 24, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

On the heels of Trio, Emmylou Harris' smash studio collaboration with Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt, comes the compilation Duets, which collects previously released performances recorded in conjunction with Neil Young, Willie Nelson and others. Obviously intended to cash in on the success of Trio, the record is by no means an essential addition to the Harris oeuvre: virtually everything included is readily available on other albums, and the selections are erratic at best. By and large, Harris' finest material is her solo work, although the power of "Love Hurts," recorded during her all-too-brief period with Gram Parsons, remains undeniable. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Country - Released February 12, 2004 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town is a transitional effort that bridges the curveballs of Emmylou Harris' earliest solo work with the more traditional country albums that comprise the bulk of the second phase of her career. For the first time, she covers no Gram Parsons tunes or pop music chestnuts, relying instead on newly exited Hot Band member Rodney Crowell for two songs ("Leaving Louisiana in the Broad Daylight" and "I Ain't Living Long Like This") and Dolly Parton for another (the devastating "To Daddy"); the highlight is a gorgeous cover of Jesse Winchester's "Defying Gravity." ~ Jason Ankeny
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Pop - Released November 4, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Pop - Released September 1, 2000 | Nonesuch

On her 29th album, Emmylou Harris continues the evolution from innocent folkie to present day renaissance woman. Alternately sparse and lush, Red Dirt Girl can be seen as a companion piece to 1995's Wrecking Ball with the production credits going to Malcom Burn (who previously worked with Harris engineering and mixing Wrecking Ball). Here, drum loops and middle eastern melodies nestle in comfortably next to warm guitar work and Harris' gently wavering voice. Her extensive guest work on dozens and dozens of recent releases (showing up on albums by everyone from Guy Clark to Midnight Oil) pays off with great help from Bruce Springsteen, Patti Scialfa, Buddy and Julie Miller, Guy Clark, Kate McGarrigle, and even alt-rock upstarts Dave Matthews and Luscious Jackson's Jill Cunniff. The diverse production only adds to Harris' earthy songwriting, adding interest to what could otherwise be lulls during the more subdued songs, and really showcases the understated lyrics that the singer has slowly become recognized for. The teary dirge "Bang the Drum Slowly" written for her father (who died in 1993) wrings with emotion and ethereal atmosphere, while "J'ai Fait Tout" (co-written with Cunniff) is an upbeat and jangly pop song, complete with hip-shakin' tambourine. While this is a big departure from her rootsy '70s releases like Blue Kentucky Girl and Roses in the Snow, it still burns with an honest intensity and clear voice that Harris is known for 20 years later. ~ Zac Johnson
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Pop - Released November 4, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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