Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released March 23, 1956 | RCA Victor

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released June 17, 1969 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released April 8, 1960 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released August 12, 1963 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD$19.49

Rock - Released February 9, 1999 | RCA Records Label

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Elvis Presley's legendary recordings for Sun Records had been reissued many times before Sunrise appeared in early 1999, most notably in the 1987 collection The Complete Sun Recordings. Despite its title, The Complete Sun Recordings was missing a few odds and ends, plus its sequencing on CD was a little didactic, resulting in a repetitive listen. Those flaws are corrected on the exceptional Sunrise, a generous 38-song double-disc set that contains all of Elvis' Sun recordings, including alternate takes and several previously unreleased live performances. The compilers wisely decided to devote the first disc to the original takes, dedicating the second to alternate takes: six live cuts from 1955 and four private demos from 1953 and 1954. This sequencing emphasizes the brilliance of this music. Not only is listening to all 19 masters in a row quite breathtaking, but the second disc winds up as a revelatory experience, since it offers a kind of alternate history by following Elvis' pre-professional recordings from his Sun sessions to early live performances. As such, Sunrise is essential for the curious and the collector alike. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$10.99
CD$7.99

Rock - Released November 22, 1968 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
HI-RES$24.49
CD$19.49

Rock - Released June 15, 1974 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$24.49
CD$19.49

Rock - Released January 2, 2007 | SBME Strategic Marketing Group

Hi-Res
The problem with compiling an essential best-of compilation covering the phenomenon that was (and is) Elvis Presley is the very man himself, who has passed from this mortal coil into the iconic pop culture stratosphere where even his own death is questioned and Elvis sightings are as frequent as fleas. Then there are the thousands of performers who daily dress up as Presley himself and sally forth into the world like perfectly gyrating replicas of either the early or later Elvis (body physics dictate that you can't be both). Elvis may have left the building, but not really. His image is everywhere, and his fans are legion and devout. So how does one pick his essential sides when "Do the Clam" is a classic in the Kingdom of Presley simply because Elvis did it? He recorded Tony Joe White's "Polk Salad Annie" in 1970. It was hardly the best version ever of "Polk Salad Annie" but it was Elvis' version of "Polk Salad Annie," which puts it in rarefied class of its own, and making it, like "Do the Clam," absolutely essential in some quarters. When you're larger than life, words like essential have to expand or be left wanting. The Essential Elvis Presley boils this imposing legacy down to two discs of 20 tracks each, and approaches the problem of what is truly essential by choosing to compile all of Elvis' significant charting hits, beginning with his 1954 cover of Arthur Crudup's "That's All Right" from Sam Phillips' Sun Records and continuing chronologically through Presley's long association with RCA Records through the year 1976. That means, while there's no version of "Do the Clam" ("Polk Salad Annie" is here, though), there are classic sides like 1956's "Heartbreak Hotel," "Don't Be Cruel," "Hound Dog," and "Love Me Tender," 1957's "Jailhouse Rock," 1961's "Little Sister," and 1969's "In the Ghetto," "Suspicious Minds," and "Kentucky Rain." There are 17 number one hits and a whole lot more. Elvis fanatics are going to complain about what isn't here, of course. Elvis is the King, after all, and therefore by definition everything he recorded ought to be essential. And everything he recorded is indeed essential on some level. But these are the sides that broke through to the deepest level of the world pop culture that Elvis helped create. These are the songs that broke him and then sustained him on radio and television and at the movie theaters. Die-hard Elvis fans will undoubtedly already have everything collected here. This is a set instead for folks who want to have at least one Elvis anthology in their collections, and want the hits they remember and don't much care if those hits are from the early Elvis or the later Elvis or the dear departed Elvis. Just the hits, bartender, shaken not stirred. That means no version of "Do the Clam," singular as it is. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
From
CD$16.49

Rock - Released September 24, 2002 | RCA Records Label

From
HI-RES$64.49
CD$52.49

Rock - Released November 20, 2020 | RCA Victor - Legacy

Hi-Res
Elvis Presley’s legendary 1970 marathon sessions in Nashville are among the King’s last shining moments. The sessions would notably lead to albums like Elvis: That’s the Way It is, Elvis Country (I’m 10,000 Years Old) and Love Letters from Elvis but would also mark the advent of a pop-sounding country rock which influenced numerous wannabe-cowboys (a style which would nevertheless fizzle out before the end of the 70s). For the session’s 50th anniversary, the songs are all reunited in a never-before-heard unaltered version that omits layers of overdubbing and supplementary orchestrations. Matt Ross-Spring (who has worked with John Prine, Jason Isbell and Margo Price) provides a radiant mixing here. Some rarities and previously unreleased material like the covers of Willie Nelson’s Funny How Time Slips Away and Simon & Garfunkel’s Bridge over Troubled Water are including as an additional bonus. Here is an Elvis on the rise once again after his marvellous 1968 Comeback Special and the masterpiece From Elvis in Memphis released the year later… In the famous studio B of Nashville’s RCA studios (which was all-familiar to Presley) for five days in June  (an additional session took place on the 22nd of September), the King is surrounded by multi-instrumentalist Charlie McCoy, bassist Norbert Putnam, pianist David Briggs, and his legendary stage guitarist James Burton (and his demonic solo on I Washed My Hands In Muddy Water !) and former Muscle Shoals member Eddie Hinton. In short, the band are loyal virtuosos and five-star session men who bring a great sense of confidence to the record as they magnify the King’s great voice. These marathon sessions mix country songs with rock and a dash of soul. All compositions are chosen by Elvis himself. Live in the studio, his singing is godlike, and Ross-Spring’s flawless mixing brings a sense of modernity to the general sound of these seances. There’s no need to be an expert on the King to appreciate the value of these 4 and a half hours of lively and pure music. An essential. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released October 15, 1957 | RCA Victor

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Ambient/New Age - Released November 24, 2017 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
The third recording featuring the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra with Elvis Presley, Christmas with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is no different, no better or worse, than the two hit records it follows. Like those albums, it's a puffy, pompous march through familiar tunes, all turned purple due to heavy-handed arrangements that favor onslaught, not subtlety. Presley sounds good but that's mere circumstance: he was recorded with musicians he trusted, never expecting he'd be cut off from his crew, mutated into a middlebrow mediocrity. Christmas with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra can be pleasant enough because it's always a pleasure to hear Presley sing and the supporting Philharmonic plays with skill but, like its companions, it's music for people who love the idea of Elvis Presley and not his music. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$14.99

Rock - Released October 30, 2015 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released October 15, 2012 | RCA - Legacy

From
HI-RES$32.49
CD$25.49

Rock - Released April 3, 2020 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$14.99

Rock - Released October 21, 2016 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$169.49
CD$130.49

Rock - Released August 9, 2019 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
Christmas day is every day for Elvis fans! As if the royal archives were a well that never dries up. If you thought they’d about run out of unpublished material, Legacy Recordings are out with new rarities like a magician playing some sort of bunny-in-the-hat trick. On the menu of Summer 2019, this wild Live 1969, a giant box set (216 tracks!) celebrating the 50 years of Elvis’ concerts at the Las Vegas International Hotel. After eight years in the shadows, the King was back on stage for 57 sold out concerts! During one of these shows, he was backed by the Imperials and the Sweet Inspirations for backing vocals, and musician-wise, a large orchestra as well as a group which would become the TCB Band later on. This is when he would sing the mythical Suspicious Minds for the first time live. Live 1969 includes 11 complete sets, of which four are complete for the first time, and two are never-before published, those from August 22nd and 25th). You’d have to be afflicted with serious Elvisitis to listen through the 13 hours and 15 minutes of these performances. But this series of concerts is mythical, since it surfs off of From Elvis in Memphis, the album which had been published two months earlier in June 1969. In January of the same year, the King, losing steam, had joined the American Sound Studios with producer Chips Moman to put his resurrection on tape, with this total country-soul masterpiece. It would prove one of the high points of his studio career, on which his voice reaches previously unheard heights. All of his technique is there! His vocal range is impressive and the instrumentation as well as the production are breathtaking. It’s an essential 15th album which was concluded by the heart-wrenching In The Ghetto. This Live 1969 boxset proves that the King’s royal comeback was also royal on stage. Even in his later hits from the end of the 50s, Presley, who was then 34 years old, delivers stellar performances. During the summer of 1969, the planet might have been twisting and shouting the sound of amplified rock & roll like never heard before (the Woodstock festival took place during that same month), but Elvis fancied playing the classy, classical crooner. Timeless, above the rabble. Way high up above. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released November 23, 1960 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$24.49
CD$19.49

Rock - Released February 2, 1973 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released October 20, 1961 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res

Artist

Elvis Presley in the magazine