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Classical - Released May 31, 2019 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Electronic/Dance - Released June 19, 2007 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

Eluvium (aka Matthew Cooper) musically moves off in a dramatic new direction on Copia, his fourth album. Having already eschewed guitars, Cooper now leaves behind the heavily electronic feel of his previous set, Talk Amongst the Trees, plumping instead for an orchestral sound and majestic air that permeate this entire set. "Amreik" opens the album like the dawn, a gloriously symphonic piece lit by brass, which delicately colors the brightening sky until the sun bursts over the horizon. The next two tracks, although separate pieces, seem like continuations of the first, both filled with introspective atmospheres and stately qualities. All three are mesmerizing in effect, as moods shimmer and gently shift, and the symphonic music sweeps across the grooves and washes over the listener. The haunting piano piece "Prelude for Time Feelers" finally breaks the spell, along with its brighter companion "Radio Ballet," a classical piece that indeed conjures up barre exercises. This pair is broken up by "Requiem on Frankfort Ave.," a subtle and sublime work that itself is an exercise in coalescing atmospheres. After the brief experimental "(Intermission)," the gliding strings enter in force for "After Nature," with attention now shifting back to the piano for the opening of "Reciting the Airships," a moody, almost yearning piece filled with swelling strings and synth. On "Ostinato" they billow out in cathedral-like cadences, only to disappear into the pouring rain of "Hymn #1." The album ends with the regal "Repose in Blue," with a blaze of fireworks announcing the ascension of a new ruler or perhaps another glorious dawn, thus bringing the set full circle. A magnificent set, awash in textures, atmospheres, moods, and emotion. ~ Jo-Ann Greene
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Electronic/Dance - Released September 2, 2016 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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False Readings On is the seventh proper full-length by ambient composer Matthew Cooper under his Eluvium moniker, not counting numerous EPs and limited releases commissioned by museums or included with art books, or both volumes of the Life Through Bombardment vinyl box sets. The album feels like a culmination of several different techniques he's explored with previous efforts, incorporating neo-classical piano melodies as well as warm, enveloping static, but ultimately he's continuing to chart new territory. The main element that sticks out on this album is Cooper's occasional somewhat jarring usage of operatic vocal samples. On several pieces, he builds up layers of wavy synthesizer drones and gliding guitars before inserting eerie, disembodied vocal trills. On opener "Strangeworks," the vocals are manipulated enough to sound like an instrument rather than a sample, but they're more recognizable on songs like "Fugue State" and "Regenerative Being." Cooper has never abandoned the shoegaze influences evident in his earliest recordings, even as his work has become more grandiose and overtly classical-inspired, and here he continues to soak his melodies in a pool of distortion without drowning them out. He takes his time building up compositions like the suspenseful, majestic "Beyond the Moon for Someone in Reverse," which begins with hissy (but not lo-fi) droning and melodies suggesting deep ambient techno without the beats -- not too far removed from Huerco S.'s 2016 album, For Those of You Who Have Never (And Also Those Who Have). The first half of the track is remarkably calm, but a heavenly chorus appears out of nowhere after four minutes, unexpectedly elevating it to the realm of the sublime. The 17-minute finale, "Posturing Through Metaphysical Collapse," is even more ambitious, building up muddy loops and choral vocals, and slowly becoming more angry until it's fried in menacing distortion. Behind all of this, mournful strings swirl around, and it ends up sounding sad, lonesome, and lost. Well over a decade after the release of Eluvium's brilliant 2003 debut, Lambent Material, Cooper continues to sound inspired and inventive. ~ Paul Simpson
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Electronic/Dance - Released June 19, 2007 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

After taking a break and immersing himself in a 30-minute, one-take piano piece that resulted in 2004's An Accidental Memory in Case of Death, Matthew Cooper (aka Eluvium) returns to forms and ideas he started to flesh out with Lambent Material and brings them to a more fully realized state throughout Talk Amongst the Trees. The album is longer than Lambent and employs the same types of instrumentation, but takes it in a more focused and emotionally charged direction. It's experimental music in the vein of Eno, Kevin Shields and Max Richter to be sure -- but like these aforementioned composers, it's not the process or concept that is the main concern, but the effect the music has on Cooper, and in turn, on his audience. "New Animals From the Air," the album's ten-minute opener, picks up where "I Am So Much More Me" (Lambent Material's closing composition) left off; warm swirling guitar swells flying around slow and melodic passages that seem to creep from out of nowhere. This is where Cooper does almost instinctively what it takes others to master over the course of a few releases: his sense of timing. He knows when to start and let ideas fold around themselves, and most importantly knows when to let them fade away into the creative from which they came. "Area 41," although brief, provides a haunting interlude which would not feel out of place on the sublime Pop Ambient series that German label Kompakt issues annually; while "Everything to Come" and "Calm of the Cast-Light Cloud" are so warm and serene that even the hardest of chin-stroking post-rock fans would acknowledge their simplistic beauty. The 16-minute work out of "Taken" sounds eerily like Pachelbel's canon, which makes it all the more endearing and a natural climax setting up the somber finale "One." This is not just a release for post-rock, experimental, ambient or electronic fans. This is a release for everyone who simply likes honest, well-crafted music. ~ Rob Theakston
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 14, 2013 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

An ambient composer with an indie perspective, Matthew Cooper has been recording under the moniker Eluvium since his 2003 debut, Lambent Material. With seventh album Nightmare Ending, Cooper drifts into his tenth year with the project in grand style, presenting a double album and arguably his finest moment. Always meticulous and insular, Eluvium's tuneful drones have often garnered comparisons to Brian Eno's ambient work, and piano-centered compositions like the stoic "Caroling" and ominously atmospheric "Sleeper" certainly back up the reference point. Alternately, the stuttering, rolling looped strings and soft undertones of "Warm" bear more in common with both the slow-motion pacing of William Basinski and a more organic take on Belong's fuzzy ambience than they do Eno's often distant and academic pieces. Cooper's ability to infuse a very human emotional arc into his wordless sheets of sound is a large part of what's made his body of work so captivating. Electronic webs meet with patient piano moments throughout Nightmare Ending, sometimes casting heavy shadows of fear or pain, other times offering relief from that very pain. Crashing waves of distortion play largely into some of the pieces, with the nearly nine-minute-long "Rain Gently" raising the noise floor so high it becomes a peaceful din that organic instruments sit playful on top of rather than drown in. These experiments with orchestrated noise have fantastic results, putting Cooper in a class with soundscape artists like Tim Hecker, Emeralds, and many on the Type Records roster. Final track "Happiness" stands out as an anomaly, with detached tuba tones, deep piano, and plinky guitars cycling through a simple chord progression until Yo La Tengo vocalist Ira Kaplan comes in to sing the massive album's only vocal. The song feels like a definitive (if somewhat unexpected) endpoint to the truly epic collection of tones, turmoil, joys, and hardships spelled out over the course of Nightmare Ending. Much as struggle and relief become implied themes of the album, the closing track sits just outside the narrative, implying the same closure as the postlude of a novel after the final chapter. ~ Fred Thomas
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 23, 2010 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

For an artist whose primary emotional touchstones are stillness and serenity, Matthew Cooper refuses to stay in one place for very long. Right from the start, the ambient composer/producer has taken a departure, slight or striking, with each new release, seemingly making an exercise of finding continually new and different approaches to similar emotional terrain. Similes, Cooper's fifth full-length as Eluvium, and his first since 2007's sumptuous, symphonic Copia (discounting the like-minded, limited-release “solo album” issued under his birth name in 2008), is no exception: it's his first foray incorporating percussion and vocals. Hopefully that news hasn't prompted any undue consternation among the Eluvium faithful, though, because this is hardly the shift into beat-driven pop that some might have feared (or, for that matter, anticipated.) The “percussion” takes the form of soft, gentle clicks and pops (and a few distant, barely there thuds) which appear on about half of the album and bear only a casual resemblance to “beats” in the standard sense (save perhaps for “The Motion Makes Me Last,” whose soft, insistent pulse does indeed create a stirring, quietly exuberant sense of motion beneath the prevailing calm.) The vocals, though nearly as unobtrusive and relatively sparse (three of the eight cuts are instrumental), are a striking, almost magical development -– longtime listeners may find the emergence of Cooper’s voice after so many years to be particularly affecting and even revelatory, although it’s as understated an instrument as we might have expected all along: a sober, pensive, near-monotone, whose Ian Curtis echoes are tempered by the baritone richness and introspective, bruised-heart resonance of Lou Barlow and Bill Callahan. Cooper’s cerebrally abstract, insightful way with language, meanwhile, has long been evident in his well-turned if rather fussy song and album titles. Those qualities are certainly present in his lyrics, but hearing him intone his own words renders them somehow less ponderous, more yearning and introspective, and gently, wittily self-aware, especially since many of the lyrics here feel like glosses (similes, perhaps?) for the ineffable, absorbingly ruminative experience of listening to Eluvium’s music, or the perhaps not dissimilar sensation of creating it. And that experience has never been more absorbing, ineffable, or rewarding than it is here. Despite its innovations, Similes is firmly grounded in the ambient compositional techniques that Cooper has spent his career mastering. Copia’s lush, variegated organic textures, Accidental Memory in the Case of Death's tenderly tinkling pianos (albeit more heavily processed and ring-modulated than ever before), and even the softly whirring guitars of Lambent Material all turn up here, but the best reference point is the invitingly warm, expansive drones of Talk Amongst the Trees (whose title is referenced in one of this album’s first lyrics) which up until now was arguably Cooper’s zenith. With Similes, he’s made his most touching, certainly his most engaging work to date, and against the odds, somehow the most quintessentially Eluvium release yet. ~ K. Ross Hoffman
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Electronic/Dance - Released June 19, 2007 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

The comparisons are almost endless and inevitable: rougher in texture than Sigur Rós but smoother than Fennesz or My Bloody Valentine, more coarse than Brian Eno's Ambient series but not as daunting as Aphex Twin's Selected Ambient Works, Vol. 2, etc. However, what sets Lambent Material apart from most of the inevitable conveniences of comparison is that the debut release by Eluvium (aka Matthew Cooper) is really worthy of such high praise. Taking bits and pieces of each of the aforementioned artists and filtering them through his own creativity, Eluvium visits familiar elements of ambient music; the drones, washes, and layers are all there and in full force, with no filler or wasted space. Every note is meaningful and relevant, no matter how many times looped or manipulated. Shimmering arrangements and fluid transitions recall the age of sonic innovation, when Shields was king, Rachel Goswell was queen, and your shoes and cardigan were all you saw at concerts until the music ceased. And just when the album hits its musical peak with "Zerthis Was a Shivering Human Image," Cooper reprises the beauty of the earlier tracks to send the album to a soft, haunting completion. In a genre where oversimplification is equated with laziness, this is a carefully thought-out treasure chest of sonic joy. It easily could have been sent from the past to remind the future of what riches still lie in store if ambient music is executed with a little innovation. And this definitely delivers the goods. ~ Rob Theakston
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Electronic/Dance - Released June 19, 2007 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

Sophomore jinxes are far too common in the world of music, which is exactly why this follow-up is simultaneously surprising and sublime. Lambent Material, the debut LP by Matthew Cooper (aka Eluvium), existed cautiously on the lines of pure ambient and textural noise experiments. This time he's flipped the script around, offering meditations that are equally as sincere as those found on his debut, but a total 180-degree departure sonically. On this very carefully measured seven-song solo piano suite, he borders at times on Debussy and at other times on Satie. Through the cycle, he captures a very potent but moody feeling of loss and quietly tells these small stories with great honesty, free of pretense or unnecessary chord changes and exercises. Equally beautiful and accessible, this could likely be a disappointing follow-up for those expecting more of what Lambent Material had to offer. But if you listen patiently, you will be led to a conclusion that will leave you wanting more than its painfully short 26-minute running time has to offer. ~ Rob Theakston
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 25, 2016 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 19, 2007 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Classical - Released March 26, 2019 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 14, 2010 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 19, 2007 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

In the last episode, we found Matthew Cooper (aka Eluvium) lost among an ethereal sea of epic feedback guitar washes in Talk Amongst the Trees; he seemed to be going full steam ahead and delivering one of the best ambient albums of 2005. With this four-track EP, When I Live by the Garden and the Sea, Eluvium revisits elements that made his first three records so potent and original. With the EP's opener, "I Will Not Forget That I Have Forgotten," the piano suites of his second album, An Accidental Memory in the Case of Death, come crashing back and hit the distorted guitars of Talk Amongst the Trees head on in an epic, emotional, six-minute composition. This wave of sound gently crashes and we're left with the Tom Hanks sample in the beginning of "As I Drift Off," setting a very disturbing tone for layers of guitar noise and melodic swells that wouldn't be out of place on his debut album. And even though he exorcises these musical demons once and for all, it's still as fresh and engaging as anything put forth in the post-rock world, circa 2006. When I Live by the Garden and the Sea is the end of one chapter in Cooper's breathtaking career, and hopefully the start of another one equally as engaging, intense, and emotive. ~ Rob Theakston
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 12, 2010 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

For this limited-edition EP (only 2000 copies were pressed), two of the songs from Simile are paired with two new songs, “Remnant Signals” and “Crash Deconstructed.” Both are similar in feel to Simile; ambient piano instrumentals in a washed Music for Airports ambience. The title track, “The Motion Makes Me Last” makes a return appearance, and remains one of Eluvium's most notable songs, as it's the first to feature his baritone vocals prominently. “Leaves Eclipse the Light” is also revisited, but this time it is reworked by the Books’ Nick Zammuto, who adds his own spin to the sleepy pop piece. ~ Jason Lymangrover
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Classical - Released April 23, 2019 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Ambient - Released November 10, 2017 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 18, 2016 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 2, 2016 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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Electronic/Dance - Released June 27, 2016 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

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