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Alternative & Indie - Released October 25, 2019 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 2, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 17, 2020 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2015 | Play It Again Sam

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The first self-produced album by the indie rock band Editors, In Dream, was created with the idea in mind that music can be both pop and experimental. It was in Crear in Scotland that the musicians decamped to record this album, and the result is another special record that captures their trademark midpoint between The National and Joy Division. The disc also marks the first time that Editors have collaborated with another artist; Rachel Goswell of Slowdive sings on ‘Ocean of Night’. In Dream was mixed in London by Alan Moulder (Arctic Monkeys, My Bloody Valentine, Foals), and is the kind of dream that we would like to encounter more often. This deluxe edition contains six bonus tracks.
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Rock - Released October 12, 2009 | Play It Again Sam

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After two albums, England's premier post-punk revivalists Editors were at a crossroads. Their debut was a commanding snapshot of a young band whose emotional urgency outweighed its slavish devotion to the sounds of late-'70s/early-'80s Manchester -- there was no getting around singer Tom Smith's similarity to Ian Curtis -- but the power and passion of the songs trumped any "British Interpol" accusations. The follow-up found the band falling victim to the dread sophomore jinx, turning out a lackluster rehash of the same ideas as the debut. Ironically, it sold better than the first. Whether or not the band recognized they had come to a musical dead-end despite their booming sales, they were apparently wise enough to know it was time for a change in direction, and they decided to take a rather drastic left turn for their third outing. They've by and large ditched the guitars in favor of synthesizers, for a sound that's more New Order/Ultravox sleek than post-punk scrappy. If you open your mind up wide enough, you can draw a parallel to Van Halen's 1984 -- the sound of a guitar band getting its synth on but retaining its musical identity. While the shift to an electronic approach opens up more possibilities for the band in terms of dynamics, arrangements, and melodic contours -- there's a noticeable slant towards catchy refrains rather than billowing atmosphere -- this is still very obviously an Editors album. Smith's Curtis-like tones still boom out authoritatively, and the ominous intensity of old is a constant presence. And while it seems they will probably never equal the majesty of their debut, Editors have dug themselves out of their artistic cul de sac at least long enough to plan their next move. © J. Allen /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 4, 2018 | Play It Again Sam

To put it plainly, An End Has a Start doesn't have the electricity of Editors' first effort. And let's face it, The Back Room was a tough act to follow -- it was a damn near perfect debut, delivering a compelling set of cathartic, nocturnal neo-post-punk songs. The problem is not simply that there isn't a track on this release that comes close to the visceral, resonant power of "Bullets." The problem is that there isn't really a memorable moment here, period. And it's a big deal, because it makes Editors, for all their musical prowess, sound practically average. The lead single, "Smokers Outside the Hospital Doors," charges out of the gate with pounding, purposeful drums and surging guitars only to stumble into a muddy, oddly forgettable hook, and "Bones," in spite of its needling momentum and affecting lyrics ("In the end, all you can hope for/Is the love you felt to equal the pain you've gone through...Your face in my hands is everything that I need"), somehow fails to come to a satisfying climax. Editors are reaching for something here, but one gets the sense that they never quite grasp what they're aiming for. The inspiration and exploratory spirit found on the first album are not here; most of the material, albeit well crafted, sounds pretty safe. It's consistently moody, licked throughout with tame fire, at times not entirely unlike (forgive the comparison) something Coldplay might put together in their edgier moments, especially in the case of "Push Your Head Towards the Air" and "Well Worn Hand." Make no mistake: this is a decent album; it bears a craftsman-like solidity and many fans will no doubt be satisfied (and, more than that, happy) with it. But An End Has a Start is simply not the best album Editors are capable of putting together. Hopefully it's just a sophomore slump and not, in fact, the beginning of the end. [The CD was also released with bonus tracks.] © Margaret Reges /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 1, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

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Moving away from the synth-heavy sound of 2009's In This Light and on This Evening, Britain's the Editors return to the more epic, atmospheric guitar-based rock of their debut with 2013's The Weight of Your Love. However, this release is far from repetitive. Certainly, lead singer Tom Smith's baritone croon sounds as authoritative as ever, and the band has lost none of its languid '80s post-punk inclination. But at the same time, there is something less frenetic about the music here that speaks to broader artistic influences and a more mature level of songwriting. Produced by Jacquire King in Nashville, the album has a distinctly organic feel, as if it were recorded in an old theater. Adding to this tactile, less electronic sound is the choice to frame several of the songs in judicious swaths of string orchestration. The result works especially well on the album's handful of ballads, including "What Is This Thing Called Love" and "Honesty," helping them achieve a deeply moving, cinematic quality. The band also delves into several long-form, slow-burn rock epics that are definitely worth your attention, even if their sustained drama plays out at a more sinister pace. Songs like leadoff "The Weight" and "Sugar" are thoughtfully arranged; they take their time to fully engage your adoration. That said, adoration is exactly the emotion evoked by such deliciously addictive pop moments as the lead single, "A Ton of Love," which brings to mind the passionate, soulful rock of U2 and Echo & the Bunnymen. In fact, on "A Ton of Love," Smith chants the word "Desire" as if in direct homage to U2's 1988 single. A grandiose shout-out for sure, but ultimately, a fitting one. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 9, 2018 | Play It Again Sam

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Done are the conflations with Interpol: the British Editors have finally taken off. The programme includes: civilized rock rather than frankly violent, just to make their album title lie. Violence bursts out left and right: pop for the big nights à la Arcade Fire on Magazine, grump ballad with No Sound But The Wind, 80s synthesizers on Counting Spooks. More controlled, more thought out, this fifth opus benefits from the input of Benjamin John Powers aka Blanck Mass, one half of Fuck Buttons, whose brutal but melodic noise of World Eater (2017) had caused the excitement of singer Tom Smith. To avoid diving into the extreme, Editors called someone else, the prolific Leo Abrahams—who often works behind the scenes with Brian Eno, David Byrne and Carl Barât—to rebalance it as a whole. It’s a big surprise. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 27, 2020 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 3, 2019 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2005 | Play It Again Sam

Before issuing their debut, The Back Room, in August 2005, Editors were immediately compared to the dark, brooding sounds of Interpol as well as the post-punk brashness of Echo & the Bunnymen. Singles such as "Blood" and "Bullets" quickly put Editors in the elite crowd of those to watch that year. The band -- Tom Smith (vocals/guitar), Chris Urbanowicz (guitar), Russell Leetch (bass), and Ed Lay (drums) -- compose a tight rock sound that's both raw and defined, particularly on album opener "Lights." Editors are an anxious, frantic, and passionate group, and the album is done with taste from the start. Smith is vocally passionate without being too steely, unlike Interpol frontman Paul Banks, as he exclaims, "I've got a million things to say," while his bandmates add to the song's rushing intensity. From there, the blistering "Munich" and the more luxurious, danceable "Blood" are the standout moments of this 11-song set. "Munich" is one of The Back Room's especially stylish numbers, thanks to the matching guitar work of both Smith and Urbanowicz. The surging storm that is "Bullets" is further proof that from the first note, The Back Room lunges at you with a dynamic that's fierce, wiry, and slightly fashionable. Alternative rock hasn't seen anything like this since the release of Turn on the Bright Lights. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2005 | Play It Again Sam

Before issuing their debut, The Back Room, in August 2005, Editors were immediately compared to the dark, brooding sounds of Interpol as well as the post-punk brashness of Echo & the Bunnymen. Singles such as "Blood" and "Bullets" quickly put Editors in the elite crowd of those to watch that year. The band -- Tom Smith (vocals/guitar), Chris Urbanowicz (guitar), Russell Leetch (bass), and Ed Lay (drums) -- compose a tight rock sound that's both raw and defined, particularly on album opener "Lights." Editors are an anxious, frantic, and passionate group, and the album is done with taste from the start. Smith is vocally passionate without being too steely, unlike Interpol frontman Paul Banks, as he exclaims, "I've got a million things to say," while his bandmates add to the song's rushing intensity. From there, the blistering "Munich" and the more luxurious, danceable "Blood" are the standout moments of this 11-song set. "Munich" is one of The Back Room's especially stylish numbers, thanks to the matching guitar work of both Smith and Urbanowicz. The surging storm that is "Bullets" is further proof that from the first note, The Back Room lunges at you with a dynamic that's fierce, wiry, and slightly fashionable. Alternative rock hasn't seen anything like this since the release of Turn on the Bright Lights. © MacKenzie Wilson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 8, 2020 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2015 | Play It Again Sam

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The first self-produced album by the indie rock band Editors, In Dream, was created with the idea in mind that music can be both pop and experimental. It was in Crear in Scotland that the musicians decamped to record this album, and the result is another special record that captures their trademark midpoint between The National and Joy Division. The disc also marks the first time that Editors have collaborated with another artist; Rachel Goswell of Slowdive sings on ‘Ocean of Night’. In Dream was mixed in London by Alan Moulder (Arctic Monkeys, My Bloody Valentine, Foals), and is the kind of dream that we would like to encounter more often. This deluxe edition contains six bonus tracks.
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 26, 2020 | Play It Again Sam

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Electronic - Released March 20, 2020 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 5, 2019 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 22, 2018 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 20, 2015 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 9, 2018 | Play It Again Sam