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Country - Released November 19, 2013 | RLG - Legacy

Western music may live forever, but in the early '60s it had already suffered a decline. The singing cowboys had all but disappeared from the silver screen, and the days when western attire and repertoire were expected of country artists would soon be over. The album format became the new domain of commercial western music, and stalwarts like the Sons of the Pioneers and Tex Ritter continued to release moderately successful albums long after their hitmaking heydays. Eddy Arnold had a number one hit in 1955 with one of his recordings of "Cattle Call," but this 1963 LP was his first all-western album and his first to make the Billboard album charts. In addition to the expected western standards on Cattle Call, Arnold "westernizes" popular songs like "The Wayward Wind," and his smooth baritone fits these songs just as well as that of Rex Allen or Johnny Western. The re-recording of the title track is a haunting beauty with a real yodel rather than the falsetto vocal treatment it often receives, and is the version that is frequently anthologized even though it wasn't a hit. Well made and well remembered, Cattle Call is perhaps the most significant western album of the '60s. ~ Greg Adams
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Country - Released September 14, 2018 | RCA - Legacy

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Country - Released November 19, 2010 | Legacy Recordings

My World was certified gold in 1965 on the strength of Eddy Arnold's smash hits "Make the World Go Away" and "What's He Doing in My World." ~ Steve Huey
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Country - Released October 16, 2000 | Buddha Records

There have been many Eddy Arnold collections released over the years, but Buddha's 2000 compilation RCA Country Legends stands as one of the best. This is especially true because CD-era collections of his RCA countrypolitan work have been confusing, either existing as budget-line discs or as jumbled overviews that didn't hit enough of the high points. Since this collection focuses on his RCA recordings, it doesn't have any of his early, rawer sides, and since it only runs 16 tracks, it does leave off many of his hits. However, it has most of the big songs -- "I'll Hold You in My Heart (Till I Can Hold You in My Arms)," "Anytime," "Bouquet of Roses," "The Cattle Call," "What's He Doing in My World," "Make the World Go Away" -- and its song selection is superb, offering a good overview of his commercial peak of the late '40s through the mid-'60s. Until a more thorough overview comes along, this stands as the most thoughtful overview of Arnold's RCA work. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released February 8, 2019 | RCA - Legacy

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Country - Released June 12, 2015 | Legacy Recordings

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Despite the title, which implies that this is going to be another one of Eddy Arnold's many MOR pop albums, The Easy Way is actually one of the most invigorating and enjoyable of his mid-'60s LPs. "Bad News" is a funny, boastful tune that had been a minor hit for its writer, John D. Loudermilk. "Tell 'Em Where You Got Your Blues" and "Baby I've Got It" are blues-based with some ace guitar, probably played by producer Chet Atkins. "What-Cha Gonna Do" is the kind of up-tempo country song that became a rarity on Arnold's later albums, and the melody of "Understand Your Man" is very close to Bob Dylan's "Don't Think Twice, It's Alright." Most of the other tracks take a laid-back approach and are more in alignment with the expectations of the mainstream listeners who made giant hits out of songs like "Make the World Go Away" and "What's He Doing in My World" around this time. Bill Walker's arrangements seem to favor the electric guitar a little more than usual, which lends a slight edge that is often lacking on Arnold's pop ballads. ~ Greg Adams
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Country - Released October 1, 1969 | RCA - Legacy

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Country - Released January 24, 1969 | RCA - Legacy

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Country - Released December 16, 2016 | RLG - Legacy

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"I Want to Go With You" spent six weeks at the top of the country chart and crossed over to the pop Top 40, becoming one of the biggest hits of the year and one of Eddy Arnold's biggest hits in the '60s. The song is a pure pop ballad with a luxuriant vocal chorus that sounds more like something Vic Damone would have recorded in the '50s than the product of a country artist, and that may be why Arnold's huge easy listening hits from the '60s are not as highly regarded today as his earlier country recordings: In the '60s, he had a huge following among older, traditional pop lovers who have since sailed to glory on the ebb tide. Easy listening vocal music is a hard sell to most younger listeners and, consequently, Arnold's ultra-smoothie phase faces an ever-shrinking pool of potential listeners. The handful who remember Arnold from his heyday and appreciate the font of old-fashioned pop music he became will enjoy most of the album I Want to Go With You because it is molded in the image of its big hit single. A couple of mildly countrified cuts are slipped in toward the end to placate the country crowd, but the album is mainly a string-laden extravaganza of pop vocal music (even though many of the songs were written by Nashville songwriters) ably sung and arranged for maximum crossover appeal. ~ Greg Adams
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Country - Released July 18, 2014 | Legacy Recordings

Eddy Arnold: Complete Original #1 Hits is a single-disc, 28-track overview of the Tennessee Plowboy's country-pop hits recorded for RCA that spanned over three decades. What makes this compilation different from several other similar packages is that these are the original hits, not the overdubbed re-recordings. Starting in the mid-'60s, Arnold began utilizing strings on his records, similar to what Patsy Cline, Ray Price, and Jim Reeves would also be known for. Pure country listeners balked at this approach, but these tracks introduced the country form to a much wider audience with what would be known as the Nashville Sound, which kept Arnold on the charts for another decade. With the success of this formula, Arnold began re-recording his earlier material with lush arrangements. Complete Original #1 Hits spotlights the lesser heard, hard to find original mixes, sans strings, in chronological order, beginning with his first number one, "What Is Life Without Love" in 1946, and concluding with his last, "Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye," in 1968. ~ Al Campbell
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Country - Released November 19, 2013 | RCA - Legacy

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Country - Released September 25, 1968 | RCA - Legacy

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Walkin' in Love Land has an aura of nostalgia because of the number of older pop songs, like the Everly Brothers' "All I Have to Do Is Dream" and Glen Campbell's "Turn Around, Look at Me" (which was on the charts again in 1968 thanks to the Vogues). The wistful "Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye" was deservedly a number one hit for Eddy Arnold, even if Johnny Tillotson's 1963 recording was better. The Platters' "I'll Never Smile Again" is a surprising selection that is well-suited to Arnold's style, and the title track sounds like a missed opportunity for a single. On the downside, the cloying "Apples, Raisins and Roses" and most of side two are bland pop ballads of the sort that dominate Arnold's late-'60s LPs. About half of Walkin' in Love Land ranges in quality from above-average to very good, which is enough to place the album among the best of Eddy Arnold's late RCA albums. ~ Greg Adams
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Country - Released May 30, 2014 | RCA Records Label

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Country - Released March 24, 1992 | RCA Records Label Nashville

According to Billboard's "Top 40 Country Hits," Eddy Arnold is THE top country artist of the modern era. During his lengthy career, Arnold placed 92 (!) singles in country's Top Ten. Even so, Arnold today receives short shrift not only from contemporary country fans but also from aficionados of the genre's classic age. Like his contemporaries Marty Robbins and Jim Reeves, Arnold sings too prettily to suit modern tastes, which favor the grittier sounds of Hank Williams Sr., George Jones, and Willie Nelson. Ironically, Arnold has more to do with the sound of contemporary country than any of these men. His countrypolitan crooning laid the groundwork for Vince Gill, Reba McEntire, and LeAnn Rimes. PURE GOLD provides a slight (it's just over 20 minutes long) introduction to this country master, featuring a number of Arnold's signature tunes: "Just A Little Lovin'," "Cattle Call," "What's He Doin' in My World?," and "You Don't Know Me" among them. RCA has released many such hits packages for Arnold, all more or less interchangeable, although PURE GOLD is briefer than most. Those seeking a more comprehensive introduction should consider THE ESSENTIAL EDDY ARNOLD.
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Country - Released January 19, 2018 | and more bears Richard Weize

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Country - Released January 1, 1998 | Island Def Jam

Mercury Nashville's The Hits contains 11 remakes of classic hits that Eddy Arnold recorded for MGM between 1973 and 1975. Arnold was in surprisingly good voice for a man approaching 60, but these versions simply pale in comparison to his original hit versions, and this collection should be avoided. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released June 20, 2012 | Columbia Nashville Legacy

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Christmas Music - Released November 24, 2017 | nagel heyer records

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Country - Released May 22, 1968 | RCA - Legacy

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Country - Released June 1, 1969 | RCA - Legacy

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Eddy Arnold's The Glory of Love is one of a few of his late RCA albums on which every song sounds like either Glen Campbell or Bobby Goldsboro. "Heaven Below" is melodically similar to Campbell's "Witchita Lineman," and "Then She's a Lover" (a hit for Roy Clark) is a slice-of-life song like Goldsboro's "The Straight Life," or "Honey" without the morbid ending. Veteran arranger Bill Walker's contributions are in keeping with the times and are most interesting on the hit "But for Love" with its echoey guitar leads. "Please Don't Go" was Arnold's last Top Ten hit for over a decade, and in the context of the album doesn't particularly stand out. Arnold was entering a commercial as well as creative dry spell at this point, and his best cuts are better-heard on collections. ~ Greg Adams