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Pop - Released March 14, 2002 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Recorded in Britain only slightly prior to or at about the same time as Dusty in Memphis in August and September 1968, Dusty Definitely, which was not issued in the US, was a more pointedly pop production. As was the case with several of her 1960s albums, it explored a bunch of directions besides soul and rock, some well, some not so well. The cover of Erma Franklin/Big Brother's "Piece of My Heart" (titled "Take Another Little Piece of My Heart" here for some reason) was excellent and would have been way up to par for inclusion in Dusty in Memphis, and "Ain't No Sun Since You've Been Gone" was pretty storming blue-eyed Motown-styled soul. On the other hand, the covers of Charles Aznavour's "Who (Will Take My Place)" and Bacharach-David's "This Girl's in Love with You" put her forth as an interpreter of popular ballad standards that could have been done for the most mainstream cabaret gig. The readings of Randy Newman's "I Think It's Going to Rain Today" and the more obscure, but beautiful and lilting, "Morning" fell between the polar extremes, and were quite worthy. John Paul Jones, who was only just joining Led Zeppelin at the time, arranged a couple of the hotter cuts ("Piece of My Heart" and "Ain't No Sun Since You've Been Gone"). All but two of the songs were reissued on the Rhino collection Dusty in London, a 24-track survey of her British sessions from 1968-1971. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 26, 1964 | Mercury Records

Her most rock & roll-oriented album, and one of the finest solo rock albums of the mid-'60s. Besides the two hit title tracks, Dusty covers various American soul and pop tunes that usually rank at least equal to the originals, in some cases totally outclassing them. In particular, she improves upon "24 Hours From Tulsa," "Anyone Who Had a Heart," "You Don't Own Me," and "When the Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes." The production is the most credible approximation of the Phil Spector wall of sound ever managed in the U.K., with full brass and strings, soulful female backup choruses, and pounding piano and drums. Also includes a first-rate Springfield original, "Somethin' Special." © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Island Mercury

Dusty Springfield recorded so much good material that it's hard to summarize her very best recordings in the space of a 12-track collection. Nevertheless, 20th Century Masters does a good job of squeezing several of her biggest songs -- "I Only Want to Be With You," "Wishin' and Hopin'," "You Don't Have to Say You Love Me," "The Look of Love" -- onto this collection. There are notable omissions, such as "Son of a Preacher Man" or anything from Dusty in Memphis, but that does not belong to the Universal Recording group that released this album -- consequently, this only concentrates on Phillips-era recordings, and it's a pretty good snapshot of that time which, after all, gave Dusty her very biggest hits. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 28, 2019 | Play Music

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Pop - Released March 31, 1969 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released January 1, 1998 | Mercury Records

Mercury records, which controls the Phillips records catalog, has compiled this Dusty Springfield set by referring to Springfield's U.K. and U.S. chart successes from 1964 to 1967, then licensing her two biggest hits for Atlantic records, "Son of a Preacher Man" and "A Brand New Me." The result, in terms of song selection, is an excellent 20-song, 57-minute disc that includes most of her best-known material. (The major omission is "The Windmills of Your Mind," a U.S. Top 40 hit, which was on Atlantic.) The more questionable elements on the album are the sequencing and the choice of mono and stereo takes. These problems are interrelated: if the compilation producer had opted for a chronological sequencing, the drastic aural differences between the early mono tracks and the later gimmicky, extreme (and, in at least one case, apparently fake) stereo tracks would not have been such a constant distraction to the listener. (So many tracks, even from as late as 1967, are in mono, that you wonder why they didn't just make the whole album mono.) And Springfield's stylistic evolution would have been more coherent, too. Why, for example, put the 1968 "Son of a Preacher Man" its full stereo, American R&B-style glory, as the fifth track, then follow it with the 1964 "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself," in boxy mono with orchestral accompaniment? Of course, you can re-sequence the album on your CD player, but you shouldn't have to. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Island Mercury

A true mixed bag, from the sensual title track to the melodramatic "If You Go Away," and some fine soul stylings in between, most notably "Small Town Girl" (check out the choruses) and "I've Got a Good Thing." This is the last of Springfield's Philips albums to be released in America (she signed with Atlantic in the U.S. soon after, and the label declined to release most of her Philips' output here). © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 18, 1992 | Rhino Atlantic

Sometimes memories distort or inflate the quality of recordings deemed legendary, but in the case of Dusty in Memphis, the years have only strengthened its reputation. The idea of taking England's reigning female soul queen to the home of the music she had mastered was an inspired one. The Jerry Wexler/Tom Dowd/Arif Mardin production and engineering team picked mostly perfect songs, and those that weren't so great were salvaged by Springfield's marvelous delivery and technique. This set has definitive numbers in "So Much Love," "Son of a Preacher Man," "Breakfast in Bed," "Just One Smile," "I Don't Want to Hear About It Anymore," and "Just a Little Lovin'" and three bonus tracks: an unreleased version of "What Do You Do When Love Dies," "Willie & Laura Mae Jones" and "That Old Sweet Roll (Hi-De-Ho)." It's truly a disc deserving of its classic status. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 15, 1997 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released March 14, 2002 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino

Sticking with the soul stylings of her stellar Dusty in Memphis recording, Springfield takes her sensual huskiness north to the City of Brotherly Love for this 1970 slice of Philly soul. Doing incredible justice to a batch of top-quality Gamble & Huff songs, Springfield trades in the Stax-inspired swamp grit of her Memphis album for the urban soul kaleidoscope of A Brand New Me. Surrounded by angelically funky string and horn charts from guitarist Roland Chambers and Thom Bell (along with Gamble & Huff, Bell can be counted as an architect of Philly International sound), Springfield sounds positively liberated ranging through the gospel pop closer "Let's Talk It Over," an Aretha-inspired "Silly, Silly Fool," and the Bacharach-styled ballad "Joe." These get topped off by the upbeat Jackson 5 knockoff "Bad Case of the Blues" and covers of two of Jerry Butler's best Mercury hits, "Lost" and "A Brand New Me." Along with Dusty in Memphis and her early You Don't Have to Say You Love Me record, Brand New Me figures into Springfield's handful of really top-notch albums. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

This 22-track CD isn't exactly the "complete" group of sessions Dusty Springfield recorded for the BBC. It's just all of the ones that have survived in good sound quality; there were some others, sadly, that the radio network didn't preserve (including her first solo session in November 1963, and performances of some songs she never put on her official record releases). Fortunately, the 22 that do remain (including three she recorded in July 1962 in a pop-folk style as part of the Springfields) make for a good and lengthy disc. True, it's a little short on the prime bonuses that 1960s BBC rock comps usually offer, namely songs that were never included on standard releases. But there are a half dozen of those, all of them quality covers that suit her style, including Bobby Lewis' "Tossin' and Turnin'," Stevie Wonder's "Uptight (Everything's Alright)," Dee Dee Warwick's "We're Doing Fine," the Rascals' "Good Lovin'," Jackie Wilson's "Higher and Higher (Your Love Keeps Lifting Me)," and the Bee Gees' "To Love Somebody." The other tracks include BBC renditions of some of her hits ("Wishin' and Hopin'," "Little by Little," "You Don't Have to Say You Love Me," "Son of a Preacher Man," "I Just Don't Know What to with Myself," "Little by Little"), though there are just as many lesser-known tunes from her '60s releases (including two notably different versions, oddly enough, of Betty Everett's "I Can't Hear You [No More]"). In common with many BBC releases, the arrangements and performances of the songs she also cut for records aren't too different from the studio versions; in fact, since Springfield habitually employed pretty elaborate orchestral production, they're noticeably thinner. But they're still good, and detectably different from their more familiar official counterparts. That's what you want from a BBC collection, and in some ways it's actually a more consistent listen than most of Springfield's non-best-of albums, since almost every song is a soulful pop number that suits her strengths. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 26, 2005 | Rhino

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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Island Mercury

If you overlook the title track, a pop hit in the manner of "Stay Awhile" et al, this is Springfield's best R&B album of her early career. "Won't Be Long" shows Springfield as a soul-shouter par excellence, now with the backing to match, a reasonable fascimile of an authentic American sound, and she alternates with her softer ballad singing. But whether she's covering songs by Goffin-King ("Oh No! Not My Baby," "I Can't Hear You"), Burt Bacharach ("Long After Tonight Is Over"), Randy Newman ("I've Been Wrong Before"), or Ragavoy and Russell ("It Was Easier to Hurt Him"), she makes it come out in her most alluring R&B style. There are a few breaks in the mood, like a less than compelling "La Bamba" and a rendition of "Who Can I Turn To" that's close in spirit to Dionne Warwick at her poppiest, but generally Springfield is consistently superb here, even elevating Rod Argent's "If It Don't Work Out" in an achingly soulful rendition. The 1999 Mercury reissue contains a trio of tracks never before issued in the U.S. "Doodlin'" and "Packin' Up" are lively enough, and the latter features an uncredited guitar solo, a first on a Springfield record and a fine counterpoint to her lusty, shouted performance, but the real jewel is her poignant, lyrical rendition of "That's How Heartaches Are Made." © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 1, 1973 | Geffen

More than just a very excellent recording from Dusty Springfield, Cameo is one of the finest efforts from the team of Steve Barri, Dennis Lambert, and Brian Potter. Springfield reinvents Van Morrison's "Tupelo Honey," including a verse not among the enclosed lyrics nor heard on Morrison's familiar FM radio hit. What you can hear is a carefulness, not from the singer, but from the production team who worked in different degrees with the 1972 and 1975 Grass Roots. There is nothing disposable here, nothing of the throwaway nature found on portions of those Grass Roots discs. "Learn to Say Goodbye" is a masterpiece of tortured soul. Thankfully, it was included in the ABC movie of the week Say Goodbye, Maggie Cole and got some additional exposure, but for the label that brought "Joy to the World" by Three Dog Night to the multi-platinum level, ABC's failure to break this potential hit is glaring. Hugo Montenegro -- the man responsible for 1968's "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" theme -- co-wrote this, and it is superb. While Helen Reddy was filling the airwaves with "Delta Dawn" and "Leave Me Alone (Ruby Red Dress)," it was prime time for Dusty's "Learn to Say Goodbye" or the brilliant opening track "Who Gets Your Love" to rescue radio listeners. That Lambert and Potter piece is outdone by their "Breakin' Up a Happy Home" which follows. This is pure Philly sound, and with the help of Hal Blaine, Michael Omartian, and the everpresent Vanetta Fields and Clydie King, it is simply amazing that this album didn't get more attention. When Dusty Springfield takes on "Easy Evil" by frivolous songwriter Alan O'Day -- the man who wrote "Rock & Roll Heaven" and sang "Undercover Angel" -- you understand she can do no wrong here. The production and the performance is top notch. "Mama's Little Girl" sounds like it inspired Gamble & Huff's Elton John hit "Mama Can't Buy You Love," which came six years after this, the brilliance of Gamble and Huff clearly influencing Steve Barri and company. The choice of material is wonderful; David Gates' "The Other Side of Life" shows how a song of his can blossom outside of the confines of his hit group, Bread. All 12 titles are sublime pop, some of the best Lambert and Potter you'll find anywhere. What a hook they wrote for this artist with "Comin' and Goin'," and what heart! It moves and grooves like one of those album tracks you wish was beat into your head on a daily basis by Top 40 radio. Ashford & Simpson can be very proud of "I Just Wanna Be There"; Springfield just claims the tune as her own, with horns and backing vocals creating the wave for her magical voice to ride. Audiences can get caught up in the hit records of an artist, and often they fail to seek out the material they never got familiar with. Universal's Hip-O label has re-released Cameo under the new title Beautiful Soul with additional tracks. It hopefully will get people to hear Dusty Springfield take Willie Hutchison's "Who Could Be Loving You Other Than Me" to another realm. Just a wonderful, wonderful record. © Joe Viglione /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 27, 2009 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released May 31, 1995 | Columbia

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Pop - Released September 9, 2003 | Rhino Atlantic

This little sampler in Rhino's Flashback series draws tracks from Dusty Springfield's two Atlantic albums, 1969's classic Dusty in Memphis and the almost as impressive A Brand New Me, which followed a year later. Given that Springfield was one of the best white soul singers to ever set foot in a recording studio, the result is a sultry 30 minutes of great music, including her definitive version of "Son of a Preacher Man," her cover of the Rascals' "How Can I Be Sure," and a pair of Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff productions, "Lost" and "Silly Silly Fool." It all makes for a great set, but there is really no reason to not just pick up the two Atlantic albums and have everything from what was arguably Springfield's peak period. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 28, 2020 | SOFA - AV Catalog PS