Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$16.49

Rock - Released August 23, 1993 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Duran Duran's eponymous debut artfully coalesced the sonic and stylistic elements of the burgeoning new romantic movement they were soon to spearhead: pumping synths, glossy production, and seemingly impossible haircuts. Ultra-smart singles like "Girls on Film" and "Planet Earth" became instant smash hits both in the U.K. and America, and other fine pop gems such as "Anyone Out There" and "Careless Memories" rounded out the album's stellar first side. Side two was a far more experimental and revealing affair, with primary songwriter Nick Rhodes leading the band through atmospheric mood-pieces like "Night Boat," "Sound of Thunder," and the instrumental "Tel Aviv," all of which are particularly reminiscent of mid-era Roxy Music (clearly one of Duran's biggest influences). The band's groundbreaking music videos would do the rest, securing them a unique standing as forerunners of the first MTV generation and cementing their status as one of the decade's most successful pop music icons. [The band's first U.K. number one, the non-album single "Is There Something I Should Know?," was added to the 1983 U.S. reissue of Duran Duran, which also featured different artwork.] © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
From
CD$16.49

Rock - Released November 9, 1998 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$18.99

Pop - Released September 7, 2009 | Parlophone UK

From its Nagel cover to the haircuts and overall design -- and first and foremost the music -- Rio is as representative of the '80s at its best as it gets. The original Duran Duran's high point, and just as likely the band's as a whole, its fusion of style and substance ensures that even two decades after its release it remains as listenable and danceable as ever. The quintet integrates its sound near-perfectly throughout, the John and Roger Taylor rhythm section providing both driving propulsion and subtle pacing. For the latter, consider the lush, semi-tropical sway of "Save a Prayer," or the closing paranoid creep of "The Chauffeur," a descendant of Roxy Music's equally affecting dark groover "The Bogus Man." Andy Taylor's muscular riffs provide fine rock crunch throughout, Rhodes' synth wash adds perfect sheen, and Le Bon tops it off with sometimes overly cryptic lyrics that still always sound just fine in context, courtesy of his strong delivery. Rio's two biggest smashes burst open the door in America for the New Romantic/synth rock crossover. "Hungry Like the Wolf" blended a tight, guitar-heavy groove with electronic production and a series of instant hooks, while the title track was even more anthemic, with a great sax break from guest Andy Hamilton adding to the soaring atmosphere. Lesser known cuts like "Lonely in Your Nightmare" and "Last Chance on the Stairway" still have pop thrills a-plenty, while "Hold Back the Rain" is the sleeper hit on Rio, an invigorating blast of feedback, keyboards and beat that doesn't let up. From start to finish, a great album that has outlasted its era. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
From
CD$15.49

Rock - Released November 21, 1983 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$18.99

Rock - Released August 16, 1993 | Parlophone UK

1986's Notorious has Andy Taylor contributing on only four songs before leaving to start his solo career, but on the strength of the title track's number two placing and "Skin Trade"'s number 39 mark, the album itself peaked at number 12 in the U.S. and number 16 in the U.K. On the whole, only "Notorious" showed any real livelihood, thanks to its modern gleam and the catchy stutter of its chorus. "Skin Trade" is almost as worthy, thanks to its sultry, seductive air and enchanting but complex rhythmic allure. While the writing is somewhat stable on Notorious, Duran Duran's efforts at sounding enigmatic and covert end up being hot and cold. Tracks like "American Science" and "Vertigo" try too hard, while only "Meet el Presidente," a number 24 hit in Britain, sports a rather appealing flow. Beneath Duran Duran's attempts at trying to sound musically devious, mysterious, and slightly seductive, the tracks fail to bear enough weight in order to be effective all the way through. It's easy to see why the band would choose such a route at this point in their career, but moderate doses of pop enthusiasm would have made Notorious a fuller and more enjoyable package. The provocative, nightclub brand of martini-sipping pop that does surface is meritorious to a certain extent, felt mostly in the album's two biggest tracks. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released February 15, 1993 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$25.49

Pop - Released October 19, 2009 | Parlophone UK

Here's something no Durannie can live without. A 13-disc box set containing replications of each of Duran Duran's most significant singles released between 1981 and 1985, The Singles 81-85 is a package that -- much like the band itself, as many of the haters would argue -- is most practical as something to look at. The very idea of swapping discs out of the player after every two of three songs seems like a cumbersome one, especially since most of the B-sides function as little more than curiosities. Still, there's plenty for the old fanatics to reminisce over, from the often superior "Night Version" remixes, to the endearingly silly acoustic version of "The Chauffeur," to scarce tracks like "Khanada," "Faster Than Light," and "Sekret October." Even if this serves no purpose to you whatsoever, it's at the very least fascinating to flip through the sleeves and watch the stark, angular graphic design of the early '80s morph into the garishly loud design of the mid-'80s. From "Planet Earth" through "A View to a Kill," the box plots the course of one of the '80s most successful singles acts. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released November 13, 1989 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released August 16, 1993 | Parlophone UK

From
HI-RES$18.99
CD$16.49

Pop - Released September 11, 2015 | Warner Records

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released August 16, 1993 | Parlophone UK

From its Nagel cover to the haircuts and overall design -- and first and foremost the music -- Rio is as representative of the '80s at its best as it gets. The original Duran Duran's high point, and just as likely the band's as a whole, its fusion of style and substance ensures that even two decades after its release it remains as listenable and danceable as ever. The quintet integrates its sound near-perfectly throughout, the John and Roger Taylor rhythm section providing both driving propulsion and subtle pacing. For the latter, consider the lush, semi-tropical sway of "Save a Prayer," or the closing paranoid creep of "The Chauffeur," a descendant of Roxy Music's equally affecting dark groover "The Bogus Man." Andy Taylor's muscular riffs provide fine rock crunch throughout, Rhodes' synth wash adds perfect sheen, and Le Bon tops it off with sometimes overly cryptic lyrics that still always sound just fine in context, courtesy of his strong delivery. Rio's two biggest smashes burst open the door in America for the New Romantic/synth rock crossover. "Hungry Like the Wolf" blended a tight, guitar-heavy groove with electronic production and a series of instant hooks, while the title track was even more anthemic, with a great sax break from guest Andy Hamilton adding to the soaring atmosphere. Lesser known cuts like "Lonely in Your Nightmare" and "Last Chance on the Stairway" still have pop thrills a-plenty, while "Hold Back the Rain" is the sleeper hit on Rio, an invigorating blast of feedback, keyboards and beat that doesn't let up. From start to finish, a great album that has outlasted its era. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
From
CD$15.49

Rock - Released April 8, 2008 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released October 2, 1989 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$17.99

Rock - Released June 16, 1997 | Parlophone UK

Big Thing is Duran Duran's most disappointing album, mainly because the band sounds cold and extremely isolated from their music. Both "I Don't Want Your Love" and "All She Wants Is" made it into the Top 40, but the album only climbed as high as number 24 on the charts. For Big Thing, Duran Duran chose novelty over pop conventionalism, giving "I Don't Want Your Love" a tawdry, unkempt feel that does emit droplets of pop charm, while "All She Wants Is" grinds and clanks along with a rather unfavorable tempo, which gained most of its attention because of its unorthodox style. Duran Duran was now making music apropos for seedy burlesque parlors while surrendering their pop roots, which many fans just couldn't get used to. Big Thing is short on inviting melodies, attractive rhythms, or hooks of any sort. Instead, the band opted for femme fatale lyrics and emotionless rhythms, lost in a bizarre no-man's land of danceclub pop/rock. Outside of the two singles, both "Do You Believe in Shame" (a number 30 hit in the U.K.) and "Lake Shore Driving" hold up the best, but efforts such as "Palomino," "Too Late Marlene," and the title track lack an established feel, sounding more like experiments than rock songs. Throughout the whole of Big Thing, Duran Duran seems more interested in stringing together ambiguous, unconcentrated musical utterances than creating any form of pleasurable music. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Pop - Released February 20, 1995 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$18.99

Pop - Released March 22, 2011 | S-Curve Records

Duran Duran and producer Mark Ronson envisioned the 2011 release All You Need Is Now as a sequel to the band’s 1982 effort Rio, but fans are better off approaching it as the imaginary effort that came after 1983’s Seven and the Ragged Tiger. Follow their analogy, and this should sound like a band that just created a new wave icon, but here there’s an enthusiasm and sense of purpose that can only come from an act less cocksure than one that is on top. To his credit, Ronson was pretty near the top at the time of the album’s release, but his inspired work on All You Need is driven by both hero worship and a previously underappreciated talent to do what’s right by the artist. For Duran Duran, it’s clean and slick landscapes of synths, plus a dash of trendy gimmicks (representing the band’s love of fame and fashion) with just a touch of weird (representing the band’s love of art rock, particularly Roxy Music). The band is close enough to top form to use Ronson’s work as a springboard, letting the singalong tales of models, paranoia, and men who steal leopards flow naturally. Some tracks sway and glide, like the new romantic hit “Planet Earth” (the great “Too Bad You’re So Beautiful,” or the sci-fi club track “Blame the Machines”), while others bring reminders of the percussive studio creation “Wild Boys” (the pounding title track), or those early, melancholy numbers like “The Chauffer” (the flowing and wistful “Mediterranea”). As far as reservations, the once bold, sometimes shameless Simon Le Bon sounds a bit tentative in this post-Killers world, and when compared to the tight, original, nine-track version of the album previously made available via digital download, this final, fatter version borders on "too much of a good thing." Fortunately, the emphasis will be on "good thing" for longtime Duran fans or anyone with a taste for melodic, synth-driven pop/rock. © David Jeffries /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released March 3, 2003 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released August 16, 1993 | Parlophone UK

1986's Notorious has Andy Taylor contributing on only four songs before leaving to start his solo career, but on the strength of the title track's number two placing and "Skin Trade"'s number 39 mark, the album itself peaked at number 12 in the U.S. and number 16 in the U.K. On the whole, only "Notorious" showed any real livelihood, thanks to its modern gleam and the catchy stutter of its chorus. "Skin Trade" is almost as worthy, thanks to its sultry, seductive air and enchanting but complex rhythmic allure. While the writing is somewhat stable on Notorious, Duran Duran's efforts at sounding enigmatic and covert end up being hot and cold. Tracks like "American Science" and "Vertigo" try too hard, while only "Meet el Presidente," a number 24 hit in Britain, sports a rather appealing flow. Beneath Duran Duran's attempts at trying to sound musically devious, mysterious, and slightly seductive, the tracks fail to bear enough weight in order to be effective all the way through. It's easy to see why the band would choose such a route at this point in their career, but moderate doses of pop enthusiasm would have made Notorious a fuller and more enjoyable package. The provocative, nightclub brand of martini-sipping pop that does surface is meritorious to a certain extent, felt mostly in the album's two biggest tracks. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released August 23, 1993 | Parlophone UK

From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2012 | Eagle Rock - Eagle Records

Diamond in the Mind: Live 2011, was filmed at the MEN Arena in Manchester, England on December 16, and features a set list that's heavy on the classics, yet respectful of the band's well-received, Mick Ronson-produced All You Need Is Now. A winning blend of style and substance, it's remarkable how well Duran Duran have aged since their '80s heyday. The band tears through ancient (by pop culture standards) radio staples such as "The Reflex" and "Hungry Like the Wolf" with the same enthusiasm that they afford more recent offerings like "Girl Panic" and "Before the Rain," teasing the audience with a rowdy mash-up of 1984's "Wild Boys" and Frankie Goes to Hollywood's "Relax" before sealing the deal with a seven-and-a-half-minute version of "Rio." The DVD side of Diamond in the Mind includes the full concert film, along with interviews and candid behind-the-scenes moments. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo