Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Pop - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$16.49
CD$14.49

Jazz - Released February 7, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released April 8, 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released November 4, 2016 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released April 22, 1968 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res
When Billy Strayhorn died of cancer in 1967, Duke Ellington was devastated. His closest friend and arranger had left his life full of music and memories. As a tribute, Ellington and his orchestra almost immediately began recording a tribute to Strayhorn, using the late arranger's own compositions and charts. The album features well-known and previously unrecorded Strayhorn tunes that showcased his range, versatility, and, above all, the quality that Ellington admired him most for: his sensitivity to all of the timbral, tonal, and color possibilities an orchestra could bring to a piece of music. The set opens with a vehicle for Johnny Hodges called "Snibor," written in 1949. A loose blues tune, its intervals showcase Hodges against a stinging I-IV-V backdrop and turnaround, with a sweeping set of colors in the brass section before Cootie Williams takes a break and hands it back to Hodges to take out. The melancholy "Blood Count" was written in 1967 for the band's Carnegie Hall concert. It proved to be his final composition and chart. Hodges again gets the call and blows deep, low, and full of sadness and even anger. The music is moody, poignant, and full of poise, expressing a wide range of feelings as memories from different periods in the composers' and bandleaders' collective careers. Given all the works Strayhorn composed, this one -- with its muted trumpet section set in fours against Hodges' blues wailing -- is both wistful and chilling. Also included here is a remake of 1951's "Rock Skippin' at the Blue Note," in a spicy, funky version with a shimmering cymbal ride from Sam Woodyard and a punched up, bleating Cootie Williams solo as well as one from Jimmy Hamilton on clarinet, smoothing out the harmonic edges of the brass section (which features a ringing break from John Sanders). In cut time, the tune shuffles in the groove with Ellington accenting on every eight as the brass and reeds mix it up joyously. There are two versions of "Lotus Blossom." Ellington claimed it was the piece Strayhorn most liked to hear him play. The LP version is a quiet, restrained, meditative rendition played solo by Ellington, with the most subtle and yet emotional nuances he ever presented on a recording as a pianist. Finally, closing the album is a bonus track, a trio version played in a whispering tone with only baritone saxophonist Harry Carney and bassist Aaron Bell accompanying Ellington. The piece was supposedly recorded as the band was packing up to leave. Its informality and soulful verve feel like they are an afterthought, an unwillingness to completely let go, a eulogy whose final words are questions, elegantly stated and met with only the echo of their last vibrations ringing in an empty room, full of wondering, longing, and helplessness, but above all the point of the questions themselves: "Is this enough?" or "Can there ever be enough to pay an adequate tribute to this man?" They are interesting questions, because only five years later we would all be saying the same thing about Ellington. For a man who issued well over 300 albums, this set is among his most profoundly felt and very finest recorded moments. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 18, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn combined old and new compositions to create the album Afro-Bossa, a suite consisting of a dozen pieces that was never performed in its entirety in concert, though several of the works remained in the band's repertoire. The title cut is a new work, though the "Bossa" does not refer to Brazilian music; instead, it is a mix of African and Latin influences that slowly builds with insistent percussion to a blazing finale of brass and reeds. "Purple Gazelle" (which was also recorded as "Angelica" in Ellington's small group session with John Coltrane, was described by the pianist as a "ragtime cha-cha." Cootie Williams (on muted trumpet), Ray Nance, Paul Gonsalves, and the composer are all featured soloists. Ellington returns to the jungle sound with the exotic "Moonbow," showcasing a trio of dissonant clarinets and Nance's effective plunger mute work on trumpet, along with the matchless altoist Johnny Hodges. Strayhorn's "Tigress" puts the spotlight on Gonsalves, Williams, and clarinetist Jimmy Hamilton in an infectious Latin setting. "Pyramid" dates from 1938, written by Ellington with Juan Tizol, but it is trombonist Lawrence Brown who takes over Tizol's role, along with contributions by baritonist Harry Carney and Williams. This is easily one of Duke Ellington's essential studio recordings of the 1960s, though it isn't as widely recognized as it ought to be. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
From
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released March 3, 2017 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released April 27, 1999 | Columbia - Legacy

From
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | GRP

Digital Duke is a collection of digitally mixed and mastered compositions written by and usually associated with Duke Ellington. Mercer Ellington, the younger half of the father-and-son team, conducts the Duke Ellington Orchestra complete with former members of Duke's orchestra Louis Bellson, Chuck Connors, Clark Terry, Norris Turney, and Britt Woodman. Special guest performances by Branford Marsalis, Eddie Daniels, Roland Hanna, and Gerry Wiggins add to the excitement of the newly mastered collaborations. Produced by Michael Abene and Mercer Ellington, the three days spent at Clinton Recording Studio in New York City sets out to improve the relationship between the generations and their long-term appreciation of the swing era. Executive producers Dave Grusin and Larry Rosen decided to concentrate on Ellington pieces that became standards in the jazz repertory. Digitally updating the Duke's music, which was always defined by common musical threads, distinctive harmonies, unique piano playing, and unusual combinations of instruments, would require only the best musicians. The result is a timeless tribute to one of the greatest musicians of the 20th century. The essence of traditional and contemporary concepts come together on "Cottontail." It showcases an extraordinary Branford Marsalis saxophone solo honed in the Ellington style. He satisfies listeners again, at just the right tempo, with his impeccable tenor saxophone on "Take the 'A' Train." The easy pace is exactly right, as Gerry Wiggins' piano intros the time-honored ode that soon became Duke's trademark. Eddie Daniels adds a new, velvet-like, clarinet solo to the timeless, three-horn favorite "Mood Indigo." Louis Bellson, who was Duke's drummer in the early '50s and again on many reunions, is in great form on "Perdido" and "In a Mellotone." Digital Duke is a very special project, thoughtfully executed by Mercer Ellington and company. © Paula Edelstein /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Pop - Released February 7, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

From
CD$3.99

Jazz - Released December 20, 1940 | Kent Music Group Ltd

From
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released February 19, 2016 | Storyville Records

From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1985 | Fantasy Records

Taken from a concert in Stockholm, Sweden, this well-recorded CD mostly features trumpeters Cootie Williams and Cat Anderson, tenor-saxophonist Paul Gonsalves and altoist Johnny Hodges as the main soloists in a set with Duke Ellington's orchestra. "The Opener," "Blow by Blow" and "The Prowling Cat" have rarely been recorded and even the more familiar pieces are given new life, highlighted by a definitive rendition of "Harlem." © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$10.99

Jazz - Released June 1, 1967 | RCA Victor - Legacy

Duke Ellington could have been forgiven if, by the time he was 67, he had gradually lost his creative desire not to mention his writing skills. But his genius never dimmed as witness the new music ("The Far East Suite" and "Ad Lib on Nippon") on this superb set. "The Far East Suite" is in reality eight separate compositions of which the beautiful "Isfahan" (a memorable Johnny Hodges feature) became the best-known melody; Paul Gonsalves and Jimmy Hamilton are also among the main stars with the clarinetist being showcased throughout "Ad Lib on Nippon." But it is the writing of Ellington and Strayhorn in their late prime that makes this one of his more memorable recordings. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1976 | Fantasy Records

It took until 1976 before these three extended works ("The Queen's Suite," "The Goutelas Suite" and "The Uwis Suite") were released and their obscurity is somewhat deserved. Although there are some good moments from Ellington's orchestras of 1959 and 1971-72, few of the themes (outside of "The Single Petal of a Rose" from "The Queen's Suite") are all that memorable. But even lesser Ellington is of great interest and veteran collectors may want to pick this up. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$9.99

Jazz - Released December 2, 2016 | RCA - Legacy

From
CD$12.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Original Jazz Classics

It took until 1976 before these three extended works ("The Queen's Suite," "The Goutelas Suite" and "The Uwis Suite") were released and their obscurity is somewhat deserved. Although there are some good moments from Ellington's orchestras of 1959 and 1971-72, few of the themes (outside of "The Single Petal of a Rose" from "The Queen's Suite") are all that memorable. But even lesser Ellington is of great interest and veteran collectors may want to pick this up. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Fantasy Records

By the mid-1960s, the Duke Ellington Orchestra were hardened world travelers and a well-oiled machine that could handle time zones and European audiences with nary an off night. This collection of tracks from Norman Granz' "Jazz At The Philharmonic" master holdings brings together highlights from concerts in Berlin in 1965 and Paris in 1967 and shows what a fine playing and occasionally improvisational unit the band always was. With only a couple of personnel changes between the two years, the Ellington orchestra plays with verve and flair, kicking off with Billy Strayhorn's "Midriff" from the Berlin concert. This is followed by a 14-minute piece called "Ad Lib On Nippon" based on the band's travels to Japan, featuring the clarinet work of co-composer Jimmy Hamilton. Another Strayhorn composition, "Chelsea Bridge," provides an ample showcase for tenor saxophonist Paul Gonsalves, who invests his solo passages with so much emotion that Ellington calls for an encore at tune's end. "Happy-Go-Lucky Local" (originally part of his Deep South Suite) was one of Duke's most successful "train tunes," and again, Gonsalves provides most of the fireworks on this Ellington flag waver. The 1967 Paris concert begins with one of Billy Strayhorn's final compositions, "Blood Count," a somber, reflective piece that features a beautiful solo from Johnny Hodges. Hot on the heels of that is the jumping "Harmony In Harlem," which features Hodges doing some atypically (for him) fast solo work. This sets the stage for Johnny's extended workout on "Things Ain't What They Used to Be," a pithy reminder that the alto sax great was a great blues player as well as a master of ballad artistry. The response to this number is so overwhelming that Ellington features him again on "Drag," a soulfully constructed 16-bar piece that finds Hodges in a most playful mood and the audience responding wonderfully in kind. Ellington follows this with a 30-year-old staple of his band book, "Rockin' In Rhythm," featuring marvelous solos from Harry Carney on clarinet, Lawrence Brown on trombone and Cat Anderson blasting the band out on the coda, hitting high notes at the end with Al Killian-like authority. The concert and disc finish with Duke answering a request for "The Second Portrait of the Lion," a lively example of Ellington's seldom-heard stride piano playing. Surviving tapes sound reasonably good, and this makes a wonderful addition to Duke's legacy of live recordings. © Cub Koda /TiVo