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Classical - Released October 24, 2011 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica - Exceptional sound - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 27, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released November 21, 2014 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released July 3, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 27, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
German soprano Diana Damrau, mostly a Mozart specialist, pushes her repertoire forward into the Italian 19th century with the awkwardly titled Fiamma del Belcanto. It might seem a recital that covers territory explored many times before, but in fact it has a lot to it, and is entirely suitable for a singer in mid-career. Damrau follows the moves of bel canto opera, the contrast of dramatic introduction, lyric cavatina, and big, vigorous cabaletta, through the 19th century, showing how they were still present in middle-period Verdi even as he began to ask questions the traditional forms could not answer, and even in the verismo operas of Puccini and Leoncavallo at the century's end, works for which Damrau does not quite have the vocal size. The entire program holds together well, though, and Damrau has both flair and a large variety of vocal textures that make most of the music convincing. Her characterizations are without exception distinctive and well thought out. A subsidiary theme is the German literary presence in Italian opera; three of the operatic stories on the album derive ultimately from Schiller. With crack accompaniment from the Orchestra Teatro Regio Torino under Gianandrea Noseda, this is a well-above-average operatic recital.
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Lieder (German) - Released January 11, 2019 | Warner Classics

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By turns ecstatic and deeply depressed, as is the way with bipolar disorders, Hugo Wolf gave the world great and precious masterpieces in the genre of the lied with his great cycles, in particular Italienisches Liederbuch, for two voices, which represents the soul of the art. 46 lieder speak of love, focusing on the tangled feelings of man and woman across lovers' dialogues in ironic, gallant and impassioned tones. Written around words by Paul Heyse based on anonymous Tuscan poems, this collection is full of ballads, and in particular rispetti (compliments), folksy poems made up of two quatrains. The German translation seriously disfigures the light touch of the Italian original, especially as Hugo Wolf makes no attempt to "do Italian" in his compositions. “I assure you: a warm heart beats in the little chests of my youngest southern children, who, despite everything, cannot hide their German origins. Yes, their hearts beat in German, even though the sun shines in Italian", he told a friend. This Italian collection is made up of, as Stéphanie Goldet writes, "little love stories, moments of impatience or frustration, wishes and warnings, complaints and recriminations, demands and unconditional surrenders". Recorded in concert at the Hesse Philharmonic on 18 February 2018, this new recording ranks alongside other legendary records such as those by Schwarzkopf and Fischer-Dieskau; it will surely become a new reference point version. While it was reasonable to worry about Jonas Kaufmann's voice, we can hear that it has recovered all its strength and its thousand and one miraculous nuances. His partner, Diana Damrau, is radiant, with a song that brings together the many different emotions of a worried and sometimes mischievous young girl. But this dialogue would be nothing without the subtle and refined piano-playing of Helmut Deutsch, who has given these miniatures such an irresistible accompaniment. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 21, 2014 | Warner Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 11, 2019 | Warner Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released May 5, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | Profil

Booklet
It's not for nothing that 1840 is thought of as Schumann's "year of the Lied": Dichterliebe, Frauen-Liebe und Leben , the two great Liederkreis – Heine and Eichendorff – as well as a number of other cycles came to be, plus this Myrten, which was written as a wedding gift for Clara Wieck. The 26 Lieder are in fact not connected by any organic link: rather, they are like a crown made of 26 flowers, all essentially different, all displaying the immense diversity of the composer's art in the domain of the Lied, running from a traveller's scrapbook – in the Orientalist texts of Goethe's West–östlicher Divan , Burns's Scotland or Venice with its gondolieri – to the more domestic and familial, by way of ambiguous moments evoking the Lotusblume (lotus flower) or the bucolic air of Germany. Soprano Diana Damrau and baritone Iván Paley, accompanied on the piano by Stephan Matthias Lademann, share the score, each choosing Lieder which best fit their voice – without any transposition; all the original tonalities are retained. Because, while the texts aren't necessarily organically connected to one another, the transition from one Lied to the next is strongly structured, and any modifications would break the tonal balance. Moreover, the alternation between male and female voices really puts the accent on the feminine-masculine aspect of the cycle, and it avoids any monotony. This is a very fine production indeed. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 1, 2017 | Orfeo

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Sacred Vocal Music - Released January 1, 2005 | Haenssler Classic

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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | Warner Classics International

Booklet
Even though she is a celebrated operatic star with many brilliant coloratura roles in her repertoire, Diana Damrau is also a versatile performer in many other styles of vocal music, including concert arias, art songs, pop standards, and songs from musicals and movies. Because she embraces such a wide range of material with affection and technical ease, she is able to move gracefully between the worlds of Viennese operetta, Broadway show tunes, and music from Disney films, with only the slightest indications from her well-supported vocal production and crisp diction that she is much better known for her performances of Mozart, Donizetti, Verdi, and Strauss. This 2013 album brings together songs by many of Damrau's favorite composers of light music, including Franz Lehár, George Gershwin, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Stephen Sondheim, Leonard Bernstein, Harold Arlen, Richard Rodgers, and many more from the golden age of operetta, musical theater, and film musicals. The arrangements are well-suited to her powerful but subtly expressive voice, and David Charles Abell leads the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra with sensitivity to the program's changing moods. Erato's sound is big and full, which gives a certain uniformity to the ensemble's sound, though Damrau is always front and center in the mix.
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Classical - Released May 5, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

Booklet
Giacomo Meyerbeer, the French composer with an Italian-German name (adopted) and a Jewish background, was the toast of Paris for much of the middle 19th century, the musical collaborator of the great Eugène Scribe, and the single person in whose hands the genre of grand opera most clearly took shape. His music fell out of fashion among the late Romantics, was further depressed by Nazi bans, and has taken a while to come back into style. This fine anthology by German soprano Diana Damrau will help his cause. Plainly a labor of love, the album includes arias in German (one very early) and Italian as well as French, and among the latter from opéras comiques as well as grand opera. Some of the music sounds like Rossini, some like Wagner (whom Meyerbeer backed early in his career and was repaid by an anti-Semitic campaign), but most of it has a distinctive voice marked above all by splendid vocal writing. The music often hangs in the soprano's top register, and Damrau evokes how Meyerbeer's audiences must have felt on the knife's edge. There are examples of Meyerbeer's masterful orchestration, such as the flute duo from L'étoile du Nord, and the support from the Orchestra and Chorus of the National Opera of Lyon is top-notch, as is Erato's engineering. One gets the impression here that no expense was spared, rare enough in opera these days, and that the money was well spent. To hear it all tied together, sample "O beau pays de la Touraine", with Damrau excelling in both the haunting middle section and the fireworks of the finale. Brava!
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Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Profil

Booklet
Diana Damrau is arguably one of the finest artists in the opera world in the early 21st century, with exquisite phrasing, drama, and heartfelt emotion. One need only hear her interpretations of German lieder, the Queen of the Night, or even Bernstein. Yet these Verdi canzoni are rather a disappointment, given Damrau's prodigious talent, though César Augusto Gutiérrez and Paul Armin Edelmann seem to be better suited to this repertoire. Damrau's Stornello begins this album, and there is too much scooping and added drama in the voice. The legato lines are lost, and Damrau interprets them in a more spoken fashion. Lo spazzacamino comes across as too bright and shrill; the drama seems to be coming more from the artist putting something into the song, rather than organically coming from the song itself. Sometimes the pitch variation in Damrau's vibrato creates a bit too much distortion, such as when she sings "Perduto ho la pace" in the song of the same name. However, here, one can hear Damrau's beautiful lower voice, and perhaps this song succeeds more because there is more restraint in her interpretation. Brindisi (2nd version) in particular demonstrates the general problem with all of these songs: it needs more darkness and heft in the voice, and these are generally not qualities for which Damrau is renowned. This is not to say that brighter, lighter voices should not sing Verdi, for Gilda is not a spinto role; rather, Damrau's voice is not suited to these particular Verdi canzoni. Regarding the other artists, Edelmann's baritone is tender and lyrical, as in La seduzione and in Nell'orror di notte oscura, for he evokes sympathy in the listener, he has the ability to touch you. His legato and lyricism are like that of a tenor. But sometimes, one feels that the fire and passion needed for Verdi are a bit lacking; Non t'accostar is turned into a lied. The most successful match is Gutiérrez with the Verdi songs. He has more brightness and power, such as in the Brindisi and Il mistero (which is executed flawlessly), solid technique, and a consistent sound that never breaks. Sometimes his phrasing tends to run all the same, as does Edelmann's on occasion. Overall, this is not the most ideal choice of artists for Verdi, but this in no way disregards the great abilities of these opera singers.
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Classical - Released December 7, 2018 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 24, 2011 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released June 1, 2015 | Profil

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Classical - Released May 3, 2011 | Telos Music