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Jazz - Released May 10, 2019 | Sunnyside

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released June 12, 2020 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1983 | ECM

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Jazz - Released May 11, 2018 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released November 13, 2015 | SBCMG

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Jazz - Released July 8, 2014 | Sunnyside

Pianist Denny Zeitlin's 2014 studio album, Stairway to the Stars, is an intimate, standards-centric, jazz trio album. Joined by bassist Buster Williams and drummer Matt Wilson, Zeitlin delves a batch of atmospheric, lyrical songs including takes on such tunes as "There Will Never Be Another You," "I Could Have Told You," "Spring Is Here," and more. This is romantic, sophisticated music that should appeal to longtime Zeitlin fans and lovers of lyrical jazz alike. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 8, 2016 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released February 10, 2009 | Sunnyside

With a full-time psychiatric practice and work as a medical school professor, Denny Zeitlin is only able to break away to tour for short periods at a stretch. One of his favorite trios includes bassist Buster Williams and drummer Matt Wilson, both of whom are not only bandleaders themselves but are in-demand sidemen as well. When all the stars align, the three men look forward to getting together to play. This live CD compiles performances from three different dates between 2001 and 2006. Zeitlin has always given a fresh touch to standards, but his extended interpretation of "The Night Has 1000 Eyes" incorporates extensive free improvisation, dramatic changes in direction, and a wonderfully disguised introduction, with all three musicians playing brilliantly. His reworking of "All of You" has a loping gait and adds new harmonies, approaching it in an angular fashion. Zeitlin's rapid-fire attack is at the forefront in the introduction to John Coltrane's "Mr. P.C.," though it switches gears midway to offer a more relaxed (but no less intense) groove. The pianist has long been a gifted composer. "The We of Us" was written for his wife Josephine, an intimate ballad that shimmers in the trio's gifted hands. The multifaceted "Prime Times" constantly shifts its shape, with a surprisingly soft ending. Williams sets up the finale number by improvising a brilliant unaccompanied solo, leading into a romp through David Friesen's bluesy, infectious "Signs & Wonders." Highly recommended. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 1, 2016 | MAXJAZZ

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Jazz - Released July 3, 2012 | Sunnyside

Denny Zeitlin has balanced careers as a psychiatrist, medical school professor, and jazz pianist/composer since earning his MD at Johns Hopkins in 1964. Equally at home performing with his working trio and as a solo pianist, Zeitlin focuses on the latter in this striking session which he recorded himself in his home studio. His imaginative arrangements of the familiar standards that make up much of this collection put them into a new light, perfect for late-night listening with someone special. "Body and Soul" has been recorded so frequently in the decades since Coleman Hawkins' landmark 1939 record that it would seem that there is little left to explore within it, but Zeitlin's lush reharmonization reveals new glistening facets in this timeless gem. "Good-Bye," long associated with Benny Goodman as his sign-off theme, packs an even greater emotional punch with Zeitlin's deliberate, thoughtful setting. Jazz musicians have often turned the '40s ballad "I Hear a Rhapsody" into an uptempo swinger, though Zeitlin's introspective rubato treatment returns it to its romantic roots, seducing the listener with his lyrical playing. The pianist's fresh rendition of the poignant ballad "You Don't Know What Love Is" begins with him improvising on its bridge and slowly working his way into it, adding a subtle Latin undercurrent as he reharmonizes its familiar theme. Zeitlin also revisits two of his originals, the mysterious "Time Remembers One Time Once" and the richly textured "Wherever You Are." This compelling solo piano CD is destined to become one of Denny Zeitlin's landmark recordings. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 4, 2014 | Intuition

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Jazz - Released December 16, 1964 | Columbia

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Jazz - Released October 16, 1967 | Columbia - Legacy

Denny Zeitlin's fourth Columbia record has a pair of studio sessions featuring two separate trios, but both show his growing interest in abstract arrangements; the music is so exciting that one could believe it was recorded before a live audience if not for the pristine sound. Charlie Haden and Jerry Granelli join him on the pianist's long free piece "Mirage." After replacing them with bassist Joe Halpin and drummer Oliver Johnson, Zeitlin packs a powerful wallop with an aggressive dissonant take of "I Got Rhythm." Briefly available as a reissue in the 1970s, this fine LP deserves to be out on CD. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released December 26, 1964 | Columbia

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Jazz - Released June 21, 2011 | Sunnyside

Since the mid-'60s, Denny Zeitlin has balanced his multiple careers as a psychiatrist, medical school professor, and jazz pianist/composer. Late in his career he has focused more frequently on solo piano, including this second live CD for Sunnyside of unaccompanied performances, drawn from concerts in 2008 and 2010. Zeitlin's touch is so distinctive that his longtime fans will recognize his playing immediately, particularly in his introspective, inventive approach to Wayne Shorter's modal masterpiece. Zeitlin strums and hand mutes the piano's strings, interweaves magical improvised lines, and keeps this familiar work fresh with his dramatic interpretation. His lyrical take of trumpeter Tom Harrell's "Sail Away" is a masterful, subtle exploration. The pianist's galloping treatment of John Coltrane's "Lazy Bird" is similar to his earlier version on his CD At Maybeck, though he takes even more chances this time around. Zeitlin is also at home with standards, offering a lush, spacious treatment of "As Long as There's Music" and a slow, shimmering setting of "People Will Say We're in Love." The pianist's originals are just as striking. Zeitlin has recorded his infectious "Brazilian Street Dance" on several CDs, though this playful version includes a subtle introduction with the pianist strumming and tapping the beat on the piano strings, then becoming a one-man Brazilian band with his rhythmically charged performance. For the other two originals, he revisits works he wrote early in his career. The eerie "Labyrinth" keeps the listener guessing as to its direction, often sounding as if it was a totally improvised piece. Zeitlin's edgy "Slipstream" blends an improvised introduction and a wide-ranging exploration incorporating adept use of dense chords, pedal technique, and string manipulation in a breathtaking finale. Like the vintage wines that Denny Zeitlin collects, the masterful pianist keeps getting better with age. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 18, 2010 | Sunnyside

Denny Zeitlin's career as one of the greatest but woefully under-appreciated modern jazz pianists, may have taken a turn with the release of his early period Mosaic/Columbia trio reissue studio sessions, and several fine recordings for the Sunnyside label. This solo concert done at the Ralston House in Santa Barbara, CA recalls older standard favorites of Zeitlin's and adds on some of his beautifully conceived originals, exuding a spirit that suggests both renewal and determination of continuance. As a diversified modernist, Zeitlin is as easily capable of playing beautifully as he is of ripping up be-bop, but it is his advanced harmonic sense that sets him above and beyond most others. He's also capable of modal music, interpretations of show tunes, funky underpinnings, or introspective sounds that reflect his influences -- Bill Evans, McCoy Tyner, and Thelonious Monk. Perhaps originals like the playful, active "On the March" gives you more an indication of how ultra-melodic a performer Zeitlin can be, but when you hear the rhapsodic, romantic "The We of Us" there are more layers to reveal. Always a champion of jazz giants, Zeitlin tears the speedy Sonny Rollins bop standard "Oleo" as if child's play, and uses soul-stirring, cascading harmonics during Wayne Shorter's lesser-known "Deluge." Whether in tricky time signature, loving discourse of lyrical proportions, or the occasional angular flight of fancy, Denny Zeitlin's expertise shines through familiar music and the spontaneously derived jazz that marks his a true master of the idiom, time after time. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 16, 2013 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released January 25, 2016 | MAXJAZZ

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Living Music