Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released February 3, 2017 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Bold, turbulent defiance sit alongside pained introspection and bittersweet reverie in this penetrating recital of Brahms piano works by the acclaimed young Russian pianist Denis Kozhukhin in his eagerly awaited second recording for Pentatone. By turns placid, sparse, restive and impassioned, the highly personal and contemplative late piano pieces of Brahms have been described as “the mirrors of his soul”. The seven pieces comprising the Fantasias, Op. 116 are quite different in mood but are nevertheless intricately constructed to produce poetic miniatures of great depth and sonority, requiring sensitive artistry to convey their sense of unity and poignancy. Brahms is in a more full-bloodied and demonstrative mood with the four character pieces in the much earlier Ballades, Op 10. But these too show moments of transcendent beauty as in the closing ballade where the tenor melody is woven into the mellifluously undulating pianissimo accompaniment. And in the rarely heard Theme and Variations, Op. 18b, Brahms makes a sumptuous and instantly seductive arrangement of the second movement of his own String Sextet, producing an arresting and magisterial work with exquisite tone colorations and a hushed, sublime ending. “Technically flawless and musically imperious” wrote Classical Source of Denis Kozhukhin, “his detail and articulation was immaculate, and his daredevil playing was thrilling … Kozhukhin was a knockout.” (a Pentatone Introduction)
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Keyboard Concertos - Released April 1, 2016 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The pianist may be Russian, the orchestra German, and the label Dutch, but this audiophile recording of two of the most-played piano concertos of the 19th century tends rather to incline toward England, the place that bestowed honors on the young Denis Kozhukhin and launched his flourishing career. One hesitates to apply national stereotypes, yet a stiff upper lip is characteristic of Kozhukhin's approach here. Technically, the playing is unimpeachable all around, both from Kozhukhin and from the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra under Vassily Sinaisky, who attain a lush string sound usually associated with the Berlin Philharmonic in its classic days. The technical accomplishments, in fact, tend to crowd out the drama and tumult that have traditionally been part of playing the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1 in B flat minor, Op. 23, and the poetic spirit of the Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16. Sample perhaps the last movement of the Grieg (track 6) to find out whether you'll be dazzled or somewhat bored. Whatever the case, audiophiles will find this a worthwhile acquisition. The detail of Kozhukhin's playing is captured with almost uncanny crispness in Pentatone's studio sound, which even on ordinary reproduction equipment creates an almost physical sense of space that is filled up by degrees. It's a wonderful use of the medium, but it's one that diverges from the Romantic expressive tradition. Whether that's good or bad will depend on individual listeners.
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released June 28, 2019 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES$17.99
CD$11.99

Classical - Released April 6, 2018 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
Exuberant high spirits, pulsating rhythms and breathless virtuosity jostle with urbane sophistication and deeply felt sentiment in these scintillating jazz-inspired concertos by Maurice Ravel and George Gershwin. A sparkling divertissement with witty orchestration and sizzling virtuosity, Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G major is and one of his best-loved works thanks to its impeccable style, dashing humour, and its hauntingly beautiful slow movement. In a change of mood, Ravel’s Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major is a darkly hued, powerful work with a heroic grandeur realised in a fearsomely difficult piano part that traverses the keyboard to dazzling effect. And Tin Pan Alley beckons with Gershwin’s breezily confident and polished Piano Concerto in F major. With an inventive score that artfully combines jazz elements, heart on sleeve melodies and brilliant pianistics, the result is irresistible. © Pentatone