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Metal - Released September 14, 2018 | Century Media

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Rock - Released May 18, 1998 | Roadrunner Records

With a shockingly tight performance and a handful of evil anthems, Glen Benton and company managed to craft a death metal classic with their eponymous debut. Taking their Satanism to a new level of seriousness, Benton was burning crosses into his forehead and desecrating churches to promote this album, something that didn't exactly endear them to the mainstream metal media. While similar (and even weaker) groups were getting hyped up as the leaders of the death metal underworld, this album struck a chord that would, for good or bad, instantly inspire legions of like-minded groups. The riffs are actually memorable, with insane blastbeat drums and an uncanny sense of timing guiding the songs as they charge through one by one. "Lunatic of God's Creation" may be one of the best death metal songs written in this period, taking all of these elements to their natural extreme and crafting an ugly Satanic epic. "Carnage in the Temple of the Damned" is a speed-happy chunk of blasphemy that borders on grindcore, while "Dead by Dawn" is another gem that survives on the creative riffing and horrible vocals. Benton's vocals are actually one of the main features, as his guttural growl is touched up by production tricks to sound absolutely hideous and tortured as he spews his Satanic nonsense. At the time it seemed quite evil, and the press surrounding him suggested that he was willingly possessed by demons that sang through him. On top of that, he also claimed that since he was the antithesis of Jesus Christ, that he would kill himself at the age of 32 to mimic Christ's death. Heady stuff for a death metal band, but even though the gimmick may have banished them from the cover of Hit Parader, it didn't take away from the effectiveness of the album. They would later go on to make questionable musical progress and strip away much of the brash suggestiveness of their image (for the record, Benton failed to commit suicide when he claimed he would), but before all of that they still managed to craft one truly great album in the death metal genre that will survive long after the gimmicks are gone. © Bradley Torreano /TiVo
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Metal - Released November 26, 2013 | Century Media

In the Minds of Evil, the 11th long-player from venerable Tampa, Florida-based death metal prognosticators Deicide, invokes the bluesy, blistering, and robust cacophony of early albums like Legion (1992) and Once Upon the Cross (1995). The first outing for the group to feature guitarist Kevin Quirion, who joined the band on the road in 2011 in support of that year's relatively lackluster To Hell with God, In the Minds of Evil features 11 high-quality slabs of muscular, vintage-sounding death metal with highlights arriving via the groove-laden title cut, the neck-snapping "Misery of One," and the brash, blasphemous, and nearly hummable "Kill the Light of Christ." © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1995 | Roadrunner Records

Once Upon the Cross is a typically brutal set from Deicide that is particularly notable for the guitar pyrotechnics of Eric and Brian Hoffman. Lyrically, the band might be reiterating their Satanic themes, but musically, the band continues to grow. © David Jehnzen /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 19, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

Evil to the core, Deicide were one of the more controversial death metal bands of their era, openly championing Satanism, animal sacrifices, and generally hedonistic practices over their dark and blistering metal sounds. The Complete Roadrunner Collection 1990-2001 gathers together six of their earliest albums including their 1990 self-titled debut, Legion, Serpents of the Light, and others. Over the compilation's 55 tracks, some of the band's heaviest and most unholy material is highlighted, including early nihilistic rampages like "Blame It on God" and "Sacrificial Suicide." © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 31, 1992 | Roadrunner Records

This onslaught of ever-shifting double-bass and extreme guitar riffing is considered by many to be an essential (if not the premier) example of Deicide's world-class death metal. While bassist/vocalist and bandleader Glen Benton never accepted the categorization, his band helped define the early '90s death movement with their somewhat complicated, ultra-heavy music and low, growling vocals. Legion stands out as a musically complex but familiar offering from the band. Live favorite "Trifixion" is indeed one of the better cuts from the release, but it's easier to consider this disc (and most records like it) as a whole. Deicide's compositions and performances are solid and serious throughout, but Benton's outspoken anti-Christian beliefs and admitted Satanism are what first brought the group attention, and what ultimately separated them from secondary contributors to the genre. This radical philosophy is stated emphatically within the lyrics of Legion -- just in case fans weren't paying attention to interviews and onstage rants. Listeners who admire death and extreme metal in all its forms are generally aware of Deicide's abilities and outspoken antisocial beliefs, so newer death metal fans will do well to start off their collection with Legion. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 18, 1998 | Roadrunner Records

With a sudden onslaught of death metal bands in the late '90s (Cradle of Filth, Dimmu Borgir, etc.), many forget that one of the first bands to merge speed metal with Satanic lyrics was Florida's Deicide. Unlike many of the groups that have played death metal over the years, Deicide is comprised of actual practicing Satanists. Fronted by the unmistakable and truly menacing bassist/vocalist Glen Benton (who sings in an unbelievably deep growl, and has the imprint of an upside-down cross burned into his forehead), the band has issued their very first live album, When Satan Lives. Recorded in August 1998 at Chicago's House of Blues, Deicide are heard grinding through all of their dark classics, to the delight of their fans. Included are speed-fueled versions of "Serpents of the Light," "Blame It On God," and "Dead By Dawn," as well as the more moderately paced "When Satan Rules His World" (which leads off the album). Drummer Steve Asheim is flawless with his metronome-perfect fills and beats, while guitarists Eric and Brian Hoffman shred with delight throughout. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 23, 2001 | Roadrunner Records

Things get off to a pretty nice start as the title track to Deicide's seventh and final Roadrunner release, In Torment, in Hell, breaks out of its mid-tempo grind and into some traditional, inspired death metal double bass riffing. Bandleader Glen Benton (bass and vocals) certainly rates as high as usual on the cookie-monster vocal scale and guitarists Brian and Eric Hoffman are typically tight and large sounding. It all adds up to another winner for fans of Benton's unqualified musical service of Satan, but nothing new for listeners searching for the most daring musicians and lyricists that the metal genre has to offer. Artists who just do one thing but do it well deserve more than a little credit for understanding their talents and limitations, and Deicide seems more than content to bash out familiar but confident music on In Torment, in Hell, making the disc desirable for fans of the band and death metal; however, as is practically the case with every offering in the genre, few outside the small legion of committed fans will be able to appreciate the belched vocals and speed-for-its-own-sake musical excess. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 10, 1993 | Roadrunner Records

One thing that can be said about Deicide: they mean what they're saying. Outspoken Satanist and bandleader Glen Benton's vocals on Amon: Feasting the Beast emit a palpable conviction that's rare in metal, and music in general. Even without knowledge of the musician's many conflicts with Christians, or his hatred for God in general, the wrath and terror he exudes on record comes across as being very real. This is no showbiz put on -- it's the real thing. As unnerving as that might strike some people, there's a certain frivolousness associated with extreme music that this conviction strips away, making Deicide a much more noteworthy (and perhaps worthwhile) act. It's hard to say that so much venom necessarily makes for good music, but it is definitely what fans of this kind of music (generally considered death metal, although Deicide fervently renounces this or any categorization) are looking for. Things are at their scariest on "Crucifixiation" and the angular "Day of Darkness," but there isn't a song included that's anything short of relentless. Amon: Feasting the Beast doesn't rank among the best Deicide offerings, however, the record adheres to the group's high standard of heaviness. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 2, 2007 | Roadrunner Records

Love 'em or hate 'em, you have to respect Deicide's willingness to remain true to their original musical vision. On Serpents of the Light, the band offers fans more of its infamous dark metal, complete with vocal growls from Glen Benton (who also plays the bass), perfectly in-sync dual guitar work (courtesy of Eric Hoffman and Brian Hoffman), and insanely metronome-perfect double bass drumming from Steve Asheim. Although such early-'80s metal bands as Venom and the Possessed helped invent this radically heavy sound, Deicide continue to expand upon death metal's groundwork. Admittedly, Deicide's music and heavily satanic lyrics aren't for everyone. The album's opening title track certainly sets the tone for the rest of the album, encompassing all of Deicide's musical trademarks. What follows is nothing less than a bloody musical onslaught -- you know what you're in for with song titles like "Blame It on God," "Slave to the Cross," "Bastards of Christ," and "This Is Hell We're In." Not music for the faint of heart. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 19, 2000 | Roadrunner Records

Not that Deicide care, but Insineratehymm is that rarest of death metal records that fans of all heavy music have a chance to enjoy. Continuing their late-'90s trend of simplifying their music and focusing on memorable riffs and stripped down arrangements, the songs on this 2000 release each have unique qualities, and even some near-melodicism. That's not to say that bassist/vocalist and bandleader Glen Benton decided to actually sing. His patented growls and groans remain unchanged, but within the slower, more focused riffs and arrangements, his godless messages has the room needed for maximum clarity and impact. Unlike so many of his contemporaries, it isn't always necessary to read the lyrics in order to understand what he's saying -- which adds greatly to the demonic affect. Standout tracks include the almost catchy "Bible Basher" and the double-bass juggernaut "Halls of Worship." One of the strongest collections in their oeuvre, Insineratehymm is certainly one of Deicide's strongest offerings. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 15, 2003 | Roadrunner Records

For all of their important contributions to the advance of pure American death metal, Florida's Deicide will probably be remembered in the end for the exaggerated publicity stunts of outspoken frontman Glen Benton -- possibly the only man to take his anti-crusade against Catholicism seriously enough to brand an inverted cross onto his forehead, only to almost get blown up by animal rights activists. Who would have thought those bunny lovers were the true enemy? But hey, any publicity is good publicity, right? And if nothing else, Benton was probably the only American death metal musician to challenge those wacky, church-burning Norwegians for extracurricular activities inadvertently leading to a lot of headlines -- and for the sheer entertainment value involved, fans can thank him. Anyway, since Deicide's surprisingly long career challenged but never quite matched the likes of Sepultura, Death, and Morbid Angel in death metal's lofty, upper echelons of brilliance and glory, Roadrunner's nearly career-spanning The Best of Deicide offers many metal fans a perfect chance to sample the crème de la crème of the band's material in one fell swoop (of the axe). Listening to these 20 tracks spanning a decade and five albums (their final Roadrunner album 2001's In Torment, in Hell, 1998's live When Satan Lives, and 1993's Amon: Feasting the Beast demos collection are represented), one certainly has to give Deicide credit for such unwavering commitment to their vile and misanthropic cause. Conversely, as track after bludgeoning track storms by decapitating innocents left and right, one can't help but notice the dearth of ideas resulting from the group's infinitesimal evolutionary pace. In fact, about the only serious variety in terms of recorded sound takes place via the downright crappy production gracing the scant submissions from 1997's arguable career-low Serpents of the Light. As such, later offerings like "Bastard of Christ," "This Is Hell We're In," and even the mildly melodic (gasp!) "Bible Basher" are reliably brutal, consistently speedy, and remarkably blasphemous, but never as memorable as the ten -- or was it 20? -- that came before. However, for all those extreme metal fans with aspirations of sampling all of the key contributors to their favorite musical style, Deicide, and therefore this best-of set, should not be overlooked. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released July 13, 2018 | Century Media

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Rock - Released April 19, 2019 | Earache Records Ltd

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Rock - Released April 19, 2019 | Earache Records Ltd

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Metal - Released August 31, 2018 | Century Media

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Rock - Released April 19, 2019 | Earache Records Ltd

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Metal - Released August 10, 2018 | Century Media

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Rock - Released October 21, 2016 | Earache Records Ltd

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Rock - Released March 25, 2009 | Earache Records Ltd

Just four years after being placed on life support (again) by most critics due to the departure of long-serving twin guitarists Eric and Brian Hoffman, Deicide's career appears to be very much back on track, as if any other scenario were possible for a band whose leader -- Glen Benton -- once branded an inverted cross into his forehead. Their third album for Earache, Till Death Do Us Part, even addresses this refusal to surrender with its title, then attempts to live up to PR billings describing it as Deicide's "fastest, most brutal album ever!" Needless to say, fans will never reach an agreement on whether this is true, but all will invariably consent that it's pretty darn fast, pretty darn brutal -- just not during the slow-building instrumental opener, "The Beginning of the End," nor the terrific ensuing title track. The latter's mid-paced menace is nevertheless an album highlight, in advance of some truly devastating, inexorable death metal sprints like "Hate of All Hatreds," "Severed Ties," and "Angel of Agony." Another strike against these (and other decapitating cuts like "In the Eyes of God" and "Worthless Misery") in terms of the "most ever" claim is that recently added guitarists Jack Owen and Ralph Santolla solo with inherent musicality, rather than pursuing the scorch and shriek, Slayer-like technique preferred by the Hoffmans before them, but some listeners may actually prefer the added contrast their melodic sensibilities provide. All speeds -- fast, sort of fast, and really, really fast -- get a little airtime on the album's arguable climax, the sensory holocaust "Not as Long as We Both Shall Live," and perhaps as some kind of insurance against future six-string shenanigans, even drummer Steven Asheim is invited to join in on the lead guitar action now and then, really taking charge for "Horror in the Halls of Stone." By the time concluding instrumental "The End of the Beginning" puts the icing on Deicide's latest blackened cake, fans may just be looking at this storied band's most consistent and satisfying release in over a decade. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo