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Rock - Released March 19, 1995 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released May 20, 2016 | Relapse Records

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A seminal album that helped establish the death metal subgenre, Scream Bloody Gore may be slightly musically amateurish next to Death's subsequent albums, but it trades polish for savage, gut-wrenching force and speed. Building on the blueprint of Slayer's Reign in Blood, the lyrics match the disturbing, stomach-churning qualities of the music, and Chuck Schuldiner's vocals do their best to live up to the album's title. A necessary item for anyone interested in the genesis of death metal. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Metal - Released April 29, 2014 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released February 15, 2011 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released June 21, 2011 | Relapse Records

Human started to break Death to a wider audience, after Chuck Schuldiner nearly disbanded the group. Schuldiner's playing has improved immensely since Scream Bloody Gore, as have his compositional skills. He writes strange, dissonant, harmonized guitar lines and is one of the few death metal songwriters who changes moods and textures over the course of an album; Human's second half is actually almost subdued by death metal standards. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Rock - Released March 19, 1995 | Roadrunner Records

Nearly a decade into their career, Death show no signs of slowing down on Symbolic. Granted, some of the riffs are beginning to sound a little tired and there is no great leap forward in terms of their musical ideas, but the sheer visceral force of their sound should please their dedicated fans. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Metal - Released October 25, 2011 | Relapse Records

Chuck Schuldiner puts even more emphasis on the guitar harmonies, with the help of King Diamond guitarist Andy LaRocque. Bassist Steve DiGiorgio treats his instrument more like a third guitar, making for some unique ensemble interplay. Individual Thought Patterns cemented Death's reputation as not only one of death metal's founders, but also one of its most creative, musically proficient, and listenable bands. ~ Steve Huey
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Metal - Released February 16, 1999 | Relapse Records

Words cannot do this album enough justice. This is a truly glorious metal release, certainly Death's finest hour, and easily one of the top metal albums of all time. The sheer ferocity and emotion that channels through each of the intricate, progressive guitar melodies shatters every low opinion of the American metal scene. When you combine Chuck Schuldiner's shrieking vocals (his eeriest performance ever) with the most talented, cohesive lineup yet, you get the definitive Death album. This album delicately mixes the best aspects of past albums Human, Individual Thought Patterns, and Symbolic and takes them one step further. The album is more aggressive, more progressive, and certainly more melodic. Therefore, when opener "Scavenger of Human Sorrow" kicks off, the complexity of the music suffocates the listener, allowing him no room to breathe. Even the instrumental piece, "Voice of the Soul," requires the listener's full attention so that he can grasp the raw emotion carefully woven within. No "true" metal listener can ignore the fact that Death have carefully crafted the perfect album for the metal world, an album which draws from the creative pool of Atheist, Dream Theater, and Cynic yet remains pure unadulterated Death. The ungodly solos and leads that swim within "Story to Tell" and "Spiritcrusher" (which contains one of the most terrifying, blood-curdling choruses ever) are among the album's highlights. As is the eight-minute epic "Flesh and the Power It Holds," which runs over the listener with a Meshuggah-like chug before flourishing into a fret-dancing solo from Schuldiner. The ball doesn't really drop until the pure intensity of Judas Priest's "Painkiller" works the listener over with its singalong chorus and over-the-top musicianship. When Schuldiner opens the song with his power metal scream, still with a raspy aftertaste, the listener is treated to arguably his greatest, most dynamic vocal performance ever. The fact that the solos in the song were entirely new Death creations is like icing on the cake. Props go out to new guitarist Shannon Hamm, new bassist Scott Clendenin, and new drummer Richard Christy for rounding out the strongest (albeit unknown) lineup Death has ever had. © Jason Hundey /TiVo
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Metal - Released November 20, 2012 | Relapse Records

1990's Spiritual Healing wrapped up a trilogy of Death LPs delineating the birth of a genre and featuring the childishly provocative splatter-gore cover art of the ever-popular Ed Repka; artwork that, as the years wear on, has increasingly undermined the revolutionary musical accomplishments contained within all three of the legendary Floridian death metal band's first studio efforts. But, more importantly and accurately, Spiritual Healing closed the second chapter of Death's career (the first having consisted of an unusually protracted self-discovery demo period), thus setting the stage for leader Chuck Schuldiner's imminent creative peak. From a personnel perspective (always an intriguing subplot of any Death album), Schuldiner had only recently parted ways with longtime accomplice Rick Rozz and replaced him with a far more refined and versatile shredder in Atlanta-based guitar prodigy James Murphy. After initially turning down the position, Murphy quickly realized his error and relocated to Orlando, where he joined Schuldiner and the returning Terry Butler/Bill Andrews rhythm section in time to begin composing, rehearsing, and recording Spiritual Healing at old, reliable Morrisound Studios with producer Scott Burns in the fall of 1989. Released in February of 1990 through Combat Records, the album was met with surprisingly mixed reviews. On the one hand stood the more conservative, extreme metal contingent that resented the album's sacrifice of sheer musical savagery in the name of cleaner production, improved musicianship, and evident songwriting refinements; and, on the other, the more forward-thinking listeners who embraced it for all of the very same reasons. Love them or loathe them, though, brand new Death standards like "Altering the Future", "Low Life," and the masterful title track (which even contained a brief keyboard part performed by the band's manager) showcased consistently intriguing riff sequences and time changes to go with much more abundant melodic parts and solos traded between Schuldiner and Murphy. Much of remaining material was also rife with individual highlights, but, admittedly, some songs did suffer from lingering bouts of sophomoric lyrics and gratuitously violent concepts (see "Living Monstrosity," "Killing Spree"). It's also important to point out that there was still a thrash-derived tone to Death's guitars -- not to mention thrash-based songwriting elements -- that would finally vanish when the group adopted the thicker sound and lower tunings now seen as the prototypical American death metal sound for their "great leap forward": 1991's seminal Human album. It's really only in comparison to this history-making achievement and Schuldiner's subsequent masterpieces that Spiritual Healing is justifiably diminished, because in every other sense, it's a hell of an album that reflects what was probably Death's most crucial transition phase, to boot. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Punk - New Wave - Released February 17, 2009 | Drag City Records

Detroit in the early 1970s was rife with raucous wild music of all kinds: the psychedelic funk of George Clinton's crew, the raging rock of MC5, the Stooges, the Frost, SRC, Bob Seger getting ready to crack the big time, the entire Motown scene, Grand Funk Railroad banging on the upper reaches of the charts, etc. It was all happening in various places around Southeastern Michigan, but in full view. Music was one of the only places in the Motor City where notions of race and class became virtually invisible. And Detroit radio stations, albeit in off-hours, supported local music. The influence all these bands had on the local scene was tremendous, as was the influence of Alice Cooper, who'd begun by making music in the Motor City before relocating to Los Angeles. Enter the Hackney Brothers: guitarist David, bassist Bobby, and drummer Dannis (aka Death). These three brothers had been woodshedding in various funk and soul units until about 1973 when they began digging into the heavier sounds of the day, particularly the Stooges and Alice Cooper. They adopted their rather macabre moniker and began playing loads of parties and garage shows and the occasional ALSAC Teen dance bashes on Sunday afternoons. In 1973 they recorded a demo that they gave away at shows that were becoming hot word of mouth affairs. They got it into the hands of producer Don Davis, who brought them into United Sound and cut the singles that have become--thanks to Drag City-- For the Whole World to See, which finally saw a complete release after 35 years. The sound here is a whomping, woolly blast of garage rock in the grand Detroit tradition. The songs are beautifully written, raw but very tight, rhythmically compelling, guitar-drenched and feedback-littered but focused. Check out the band's best-known tracks such as "Where Do We Go from Here?" and the hyper-political "Politicians in My Eyes." Here ultra-sonic bass rumble, staggered kick drum and snare attacks merge with blistering shards of six-string mayhem. This is proto-punk at its best. Period. Stop-start cadences meet overdriven power chords and slippery riffs and the primal testosterone energy that the very best of Detroit rock & roll brought to bear: frustration, rage, hedonism, and a Fuck You attitude. The feedback and distortion squalls at the end of "Politicians...." are the equal of anything that ever came from the era. Add to this the smoking party anthem "Keep on Knocking," the no-holds barred rave-up of "Rock 'n' Roll Victim," and the Hendrix-ian guitar blast of "You're a Prisoner" and you'll be left shaking your head in wonder and even awe. The music on For the Whole World to See is not a collection of dead dog cuts assembled for a quick buck. In an era where "lost" albums and "classics" seem to come from every label on the planet, Death's meager 26-and-a-half minutes of recorded sound become a proper chapter in the secret history of rock. Yes, it's true that the hardcore collector crazies have been paying a fortune for the original singles, but it's the music that matters. This amazing record is more evidence of Detroit music's secret story. Fans of Bad Brains, Hendrix, Iggy and the Stooges, etc., take note. The word "classic" in this sense is not only accurate, it cannot be overstated. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Metal - Released April 4, 2011 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released June 21, 2011 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released April 29, 2014 | Relapse Records

Chuck Schuldiner gets even darker and bleaker on Leprosy, the follow-up to Death's long-awaited 1987 debut, Scream Bloody Gore. Schuldiner recorded the album with a completely different Death lineup, but the record isn't terribly different from its predecessor, aside from a bit more polish in the production and composition. © Steve Huey /TiVo
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Metal - Released November 20, 2012 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released October 25, 2011 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released May 20, 2016 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released April 4, 2011 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released April 4, 2011 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released April 4, 2011 | Relapse Records

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Metal - Released February 28, 2012 | Relapse Records

Death's Vivus! is a double-disc set of live performances that pairs Live at Eindhoven 1998 and Live in L.A.: Death & Raw. These are soundboard recordings from the iconic death metal group's 1998 tour in support of The Sound of Perseverance. They were originally never intended for distribution, but in 2001, Nuclear Blast released the albums as a way to raise money for vocalist Chuck Schuldiner's fight against cancer. Because they are essentially bootlegs, the fidelity is mediocre and the track list doesn't differ much from one set to the next, but the performances are commendable and the band's last lineup is heavy as hell, making it a worthwhile two-fer for fans who want to dig past the discography. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo