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Symphonic Music - Released September 28, 2008 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released August 1, 2004 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or
While it is true that violinist David Oistrakh made earlier recordings of Prokofiev's Violin Concertos in the USSR, for most Westerners his '50s recordings of the works made in London were their first introduction to Oistrakh's Prokofiev Concertos. And what an introduction it is: although there had been superb recordings of the Concertos before Oistrakh -- one thinks immediately of the exquisite Heifetz/Barbirolli recordings -- these recordings are far and away the most soulful, the most lyrical, the most heartfelt, and certainly the most persuasive recordings of the works that had ever been recorded. And half a century later, Oistrakh's Prokofiev Concertos are still the most persuasive recordings ever made. Oistrakh's strong, singing tone, his incomparable virtuosity, his thorough understanding of the music, and his ability to make every note carry the full weight of meaning has yet to be surpassed despite decades of superb performances. Coupling Oistrakh's Concertos with Oistrakh's wonderfully expansive and thoroughly concentrated 1956 recording of Prokofiev's glorious Violin Sonata No. 2 only makes this reissue more appealing. And EMI's remastered mono and stereo sound is almost as rich and warm and clear as the best recordings made in the past half century. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 15, 2003 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or
This isn't the transcendent recording of Brahms' Violin Sonata in D minor by David Oistrakh. That was the 1968 live recording with Sviatoslav Richter, a performance so sublime that women sob and men weep during the Adagio. This is merely the very, very great recording of the Violin Sonata in D minor by David Oistrakh. This is the 1955 live performance with pianist Vladimir Yampolsky, a performance of deep melancholy and profound consolation, a performance of heartrending beauty and ineffable tenderness, a performance of almost unequaled grace and power. Oistrakh plays with such purity of tone, such perfection of technique, and such exquisite expressiveness that almost no other recording can touch it. But great as this recording is, the 1968 recording simply goes further into the essence of Brahms' compassion and sorrow and expresses it with such consummate mastery that even so great a recording as this is but a shadow of its Platonic ideal. A very, very great performance of the D minor, but not the greatest performance of the D minor ever recorded by Oistrakh. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 9 de Classica-Répertoire
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Classical - Released February 20, 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The greatest Russian violinist of the twentieth century is the legendary David Oistrakh, the virtuoso whose muscular tone and tender lyricism were the culmination of the Russian tradition of violin playing and whose influence is still felt in the playing of Gidon Kremer, Vadim Repin, Viktoria Mullova, and dozens of others. But what makes Oistrakh legendary when most of his best work is so easily available? As Philips realized early on, reissuing Oistrakh not only kept his work before the public, but was an assured income. In this reissue of Oistrakh's magisterial set of the ten Beethoven violin sonatas recorded in 1962 with pianist Lev Oborin, Philips kept before the public what is arguably the best set of the sonatas since the classic Fritz Kreisler set of the '30s. Oistrakh's interpretations are fresh but thoughtful, seasoned but still passionately involved with the music. His slow movements sing, his fast movements dance, his melodies are endless, his harmonies flawless, and his form is exquisitely poised between consideration and inspiration. Lev Oborin is wholly as one with Oistrakh and a terrific player in his own right. Together, their performances are perhaps the most satisfying and exalting ever made. Indeed, the only real problem with Oistrakh's recordings is the sound of the recordings. Hazy and recessed, the sound slightly softens Oistrakh's attacks and blurs the balance between Oistrakh and Oborin. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1959 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released August 1, 2004 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released December 2, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 7, 2006 | Warner Classics

Although it is certainly possible to debate the relative merits of violinist David Oistrakh's recordings of the standard nineteenth century German concerto repertoire -- is his Beethoven concerto really the purest? Is his Mendelssohn concerto really the lightest? Is his Brahms concerto really the most lyrical? It is impossible to debate the merits of Oistrakh's recording of the twentieth century Soviet concerto repertoire for the reason that most of the best works in the repertoire were written for, dedicated to, and premiered by Oistrakh. Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Myaskovsky, and Khachaturian all composed concertos for Oistrakh and all listened to him carefully when he pointed out changes that might profitably be made to the violin part. Thus this 1954 recording of Oistrakh performing Khachaturian's Violin Concerto -- written for, dedicated to, and premieried by Oistrakh -- has a particular claim of primacy when it comes to recordings of the work. Oistrakh's muscular attack, his singing lines, his warm colors, and his impeccable technique are all as one with the work. And making the performance even more definitive, if such a thing were possible, is the conducting of Khachaturian himself who leads London's Philharmonia in a strong-willed but tender-hearted performance. Coupled with Oistrakh's 1956 recording of Taneyev's charming Suite de Concert with the inestimable Nicolai Malko leading the Philharmonia, this disc belongs on the shelf next to Oistrakh's recordings of Prokofiev, Shostakovich, and Myaskovsky. EMI's early stereo sound is a wee bit dim but a whole lot of warm, deep, and detailed. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1962 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Concertos - Released January 5, 2018 | ICA Classics

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Chamber Music - Released March 17, 2017 | DOREMI

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Classical - Released January 1, 1955 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released May 2, 2012 | Best Buy Classical

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Classical - Released January 1, 1966 | Decca Music Group Ltd.