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Rock - Released March 8, 2013 | Columbia

Hi-Res Distinctions 3F de Télérama - 5 étoiles Rock and Folk - 5/6 de Magic - Sélection du Mercury Prize
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Pop - Released June 4, 2012 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Borrowing heavily from Marc Bolan's glam rock and the future shock of A Clockwork Orange, David Bowie reached back to the heavy rock of The Man Who Sold the World for The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Constructed as a loose concept album about an androgynous alien rock star named Ziggy Stardust, the story falls apart quickly, yet Bowie's fractured, paranoid lyrics are evocative of a decadent, decaying future, and the music echoes an apocalyptic, nuclear dread. Fleshing out the off-kilter metallic mix with fatter guitars, genuine pop songs, string sections, keyboards, and a cinematic flourish, Ziggy Stardust is a glitzy array of riffs, hooks, melodrama, and style and the logical culmination of glam. Mick Ronson plays with a maverick flair that invigorates rockers like "Suffragette City," "Moonage Daydream," and "Hang Onto Yourself," while "Lady Stardust," "Five Years," and "Rock 'n' Roll Suicide" have a grand sense of staged drama previously unheard of in rock & roll. And that self-conscious sense of theater is part of the reason why Ziggy Stardust sounds so foreign. Bowie succeeds not in spite of his pretensions but because of them, and Ziggy Stardust -- familiar in structure, but alien in performance -- is the first time his vision and execution met in such a grand, sweeping fashion. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
After the freakish hard rock of The Man Who Sold the World, David Bowie returned to singer/songwriter territory on Hunky Dory. Not only did the album boast more folky songs ("Song for Bob Dylan," "The Bewlay Brothers"), but he again flirted with Anthony Newley-esque dancehall music ("Kooks," "Fill Your Heart"), seemingly leaving heavy metal behind. As a result, Hunky Dory is a kaleidoscopic array of pop styles, tied together only by Bowie's sense of vision: a sweeping, cinematic mélange of high and low art, ambiguous sexuality, kitsch, and class. Mick Ronson's guitar is pushed to the back, leaving Rick Wakeman's cabaret piano to dominate the sound of the album. The subdued support accentuates the depth of Bowie's material, whether it's the revamped Tin Pan Alley of "Changes," the Neil Young homage "Quicksand," the soaring "Life on Mars?," the rolling, vaguely homosexual anthem "Oh! You Pretty Things," or the dark acoustic rocker "Andy Warhol." On the surface, such a wide range of styles and sounds would make an album incoherent, but Bowie's improved songwriting and determined sense of style instead made Hunky Dory a touchstone for reinterpreting pop's traditions into fresh, postmodern pop music. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 8, 2016 | Columbia

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
Rumors were rife: Definitive hibernation or even incurable disease - and then no - David Bowie made a blazing comeback in 2013 with the album The Next Day. Hardly time to fully digest this record and Ziggy is back already with the fascinating Blackstar, his 25th studio album published the day of his 69th birthday! 48 hours later, the shock is total as we learned of the death of the artist, carried away by a cancer after struggling against the disease for 18 months ... With Blackstar, once again we are tempted to say, Bowie surprises and amazes with a bold, and rather protean, experimental work (sometimes harking back to the likes of Station To Station/Low). A beautiful musical UFO that he designed with brilliant jazzmen in New York (including Maria Schneider and her orchestra but also guitarist Ben Monder and saxophonist Donny McCaslin) without forgetting the loyal Tony Visconti, ever behind the console to produce this beautiful black star. The star today is Bowie. Up there. Eternal and obviously immortal ... © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 1, 2013 | Columbia

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Rock - Released June 30, 2008 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions Sélection Disques de l'année Les Inrocks
Recorded from Bowie's first live American broadcast, this October 20, 1972 concert is a good choice for those who found themselves left cold by the awkward soul and the absence of Mick Ronson on David Live. Coming on the heels of the release of Ziggy Stardust, Bowie is captured here at the height of his creative powers. He gives a nod to the influence of Lou Reed with a fine "Waiting For The Man," and the live renditions of "Jean Genie" and "Rock and Roll Suicide" surpass the studio versions, thanks in no small part to the inimitable Mick Ronson. "Life on Mars?" and other tunes off Hunky Dory can be a bit disappointing, though, without original keyboardist Rick Wakeman, who was now busy becoming a star with Yes. But this is only a minor qualm; the Spiders band is wonderfully aggressive, all the more because live performance was perhaps the true home for its glam theatrics. © Paul Collins /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 28, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

On 9th January 1997, David Bowie celebrated his 50th birthday in style on stage in New York’s Madison Square Garden with Lou Reed, Robert Smith, Sonic Youth, Frank Black and a few other guests. Two months earlier, the Thin White Duke had rehearsed for the event with bassist Gail Ann Dorsey, guitarist Reeves Gabrels and keyboardist Mark Plati. Nine tracks from their rehearsals were recorded. The BBC broadcast them on the 8th January 1997 - the star’s birthday. And now they’re finally available on record: ChangesNowBowie. The album essentially consists of acoustic versions of songs from his huge repertoire. With great finesse and sensitivity, Bowie covers classics like The Man Who Sold The World, Quicksand and Aladdin Sane, as well as the slightly lesser-known tracks The Supermen (from The Man Who Sold The World), Repetition (from Lodger) and Shopping For Girls (from Tin Machine’s second album). There’s also an anxiety-inducing cover of White Light/White Heat by The Velvet Underground, where Gabrel’s guitar part is pyrotechnic. All throughout ChangesNowBowie it’s Bowie’s impeccable voice that hits you. On several tracks he even deigns to share his mic with Gail Ann Dorsey, a resident in Bowie’s band since his 1995 tour… This release is another wonderful testimony to add to the expansive discography of a constantly-evolving genius. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 14, 1983 | Parlophone UK

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After summing up his maverick tendencies on Scary Monsters, David Bowie aimed for the mainstream with Let's Dance. Hiring Chic guitarist Nile Rodgers as a co-producer, Bowie created a stylish, synthesized post-disco dance music that was equally informed by classic soul and the emerging new romantic subgenre of new wave, which was ironically heavily inspired by Bowie himself. Let's Dance comes tearing out of the gate, propulsed by the skittering "Modern Love," the seductively menacing "China Girl," and the brittle funk of the title track. All three songs became international hits, and for good reason -- they're catchy, accessible pop songs that have just enough of an alien edge to make them distinctive. However, that careful balance is quickly thrown off by a succession of pleasant but unremarkable plastic soul workouts. "Cat People" and a cover of Metro's "Criminal World" are relatively strong songs, but the remainder of the album indicates that Bowie was entering a songwriting slump. However, the three hits were enough to make the album a massive hit, and their power hasn't diminished over the years, even if the rest of the record sounds like an artifact. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released July 3, 2020 | Parlophone UK

Since his death on January 10th, 2016, David Bowie’s unreleased archives and essential live recordings have been rife. Recorded in the Starplex Theatre in Dallas on the 13th of October, 1995, during his Outside tour, Ouvrez Le Chien takes its title from the lyrics of All The Madmen from the album The Man Who Sold The World. In this concert, the Briton is surrounded by his faithful musicians of the time: Carlos Alomar on rhythm guitar, Reeves Gabrels on lead guitar, Gail Ann Dorsey on bass, Zachary Alford on drums, Peter Schwartz and Mike Garson on piano and synth. This was the Bowie era in which he didn’t hide his fascination for the Industrial scene led by groups such as Nine Inch Nails (who incidentally played support for these concerts). Such a fascination can indeed be heard on this record, especially in its garish guitar solos, stakhanovite rhythms and sweeping urban synths. This sound is applied to his then contemporary tracks (The Hearts Filthy Lesson, Outside, I Have Not Been to Oxford Town, I’m Deranged) as well as past hits (Andy Warhol, Breaking Glass, The Man Who Sold The World, Teenage Wildlife). There is an electric and rhythmic exuberance (the very full-on drumming can occasionally become tiresome) in this live recording that goes hand in hand with Bowie’s tendency for excess. An essential record for hardcore fans. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz 
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Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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David Bowie returned to relatively conventional rock & roll with Scary Monsters, an album that effectively acts as an encapsulation of all his '70s experiments. Reworking glam rock themes with avant-garde synth flourishes, and reversing the process as well, Bowie creates dense but accessible music throughout Scary Monsters. Though it doesn't have the vision of his other classic records, it wasn't designed to break new ground -- it was created as the culmination of Bowie's experimental genre-shifting of the '70s. As a result, Scary Monsters is Bowie's last great album. While the music isn't far removed from the post-punk of the early '80s, it does sound fresh, hip, and contemporary, which is something Bowie lost over the course of the '80s. [Rykodisc's 1992 reissue includes re-recorded versions of "Space Oddity" and "Panic in Detroit," the Japanese single "Crystal Japan," and the British single "Alabama Song."] © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 6, 2020 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released September 29, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 30, 2018 | Parlophone UK

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Bowie first stepped onto the Glastonbury stage in 1971. “As of 1990 I got through the rest of the 20th century without having to do a big hits show. Yes, yes I know I did four or five hits on the later shows but I held out pretty well I thought…big, well-known songs will litter the field at Glastonbury this year. Well, with a couple of quirks of course”, David Bowie wrote at the time. In the year 2000, the Thin White Duke made an unforgettable impression on the UK’s largest music festival. Indeed, his set-list comprising of 21 tracks is a testament to the extent of his legacy. It includes the favourites: Starman, China Girl, Heroes, The Man Who Sold The World, Let’s Dance, Life On Mars?, Changes, Under Pressure, but also some quirkier gems: Stay, Golden Years, Wild Is The Wind, and the leading track from Station to Station (1975), the unusual, melancholic album that Lester Bangs considered to be his masterpiece.  Performing on stage with his long mane of hair, his ¾ Alexander McQueen coat and his XXL charisma, Bowie is on fire. He is joined by guitarist Earl Slick who replaced Mick Ronson when the Spiders From Mars broke up in 1974 and who at the time was the mastermind behind Diamond Dogs and David Live, Bowie’s first live recording. A true wonder to behold. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Pop - Released April 15, 2013 | Parlophone UK

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Ziggy Stardust wrote the blueprint for David Bowie's hard-rocking glam, and Aladdin Sane essentially follows the pattern, for both better and worse. A lighter affair than Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane is actually a stranger album than its predecessor, buoyed by bizarre lounge-jazz flourishes from pianist Mick Garson and a handful of winding, vaguely experimental songs. Bowie abandons his futuristic obsessions to concentrate on the detached cool of New York and London hipsters, as on the compressed rockers "Watch That Man," "Cracked Actor," and "The Jean Genie." Bowie follows the hard stuff with the jazzy, dissonant sprawls of "Lady Grinning Soul," "Aladdin Sane," and "Time," all of which manage to be both campy and avant-garde simultaneously, while the sweepingly cinematic "Drive-In Saturday" is a soaring fusion of sci-fi doo wop and melodramatic teenage glam. He lets his paranoia slip through in the clenched rhythms of "Panic in Detroit," as well as on his oddly clueless cover of "Let's Spend the Night Together." For all the pleasures on Aladdin Sane, there's no distinctive sound or theme to make the album cohesive; it's Bowie riding the wake of Ziggy Stardust, which means there's a wealth of classic material here, but not enough focus to make the album itself a classic. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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When David Bowie's second album appeared in late 1969, he was riding high. His first ever hit single, the super-topical "Space Oddity," had scored on the back of the moon landing that summer, and so distinctive an air did it possess that, for a moment, its maker really did seem capable of soaring as high as Major Tom. Sadly, it was not to be. "Space Oddity" aside, Bowie possessed very little in the way of commercial songs, and the ensuing album (his second) emerged as a dense, even rambling, excursion through the folky strains that were the last glimmering of British psychedelia. Indeed, the album's most crucial cut, the lengthy "Cygnet Committee," was nothing less than a discourse on the death of hippiness, shot through with such bitterness and bile that it remains one of Bowie's all-time most important numbers -- not to mention his most prescient. The verse that unknowingly name-checks both the Sex Pistols ("the guns of love") and the Damned is nothing if not a distillation of everything that brought punk to its knees a full nine years later. The remainder of the album struggles to match the sheer vivacity of "Cygnet Committee," although "Unwashed and Slightly Dazed" comes close to packing a disheveled rock punch, all the more so as it bleeds into a half minute or so of Bowie wailing "Don't Sit Down" -- an element that, mystifyingly, was hacked from the 1972 reissue of the album. "Janine" and "An Occasional Dream" are pure '60s balladry, and "God Knows I'm Good" takes a well-meant but somewhat clumsy stab at social comment. Two final tracks, however, can be said to pinpoint elements of Bowie's own future. The folk epic "Wild Eyed Boy from Freecloud" (substantially reworked from the B-side of the hit) would remain in Bowie's live set until as late as 1973, while a re-recorded version of the mantric "Memory of a Free Festival" would become a single the following year, and marked Bowie's first studio collaboration with guitarist Mick Ronson. The album itself however, proved another dead end in a career that was gradually piling up an awful lot of such things. © Dave Thompson /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 7, 1975 | Rhino

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David Bowie had dropped hints during the Diamond Dogs tour that he was moving toward R&B, but the full-blown blue-eyed soul of Young Americans came as a shock. Surrounding himself with first-rate sessionmen, Bowie comes up with a set of songs that approximate the sound of Philly soul and disco, yet remain detached from their inspirations; even at his most passionate, Bowie sounds like a commentator, as if the entire album was a genre exercise. Nevertheless, the distance doesn't hurt the album -- it gives the record its own distinctive flavor, and its plastic, robotic soul helped inform generations of synthetic British soul. What does hurt the record is a lack of strong songwriting. "Young Americans" is a masterpiece, and "Fame" has a beat funky enough that James Brown ripped it off, but only a handful of cuts ("Win," "Fascination," "Somebody Up There Likes Me") comes close to matching their quality. As a result, Young Americans is more enjoyable as a stylistic adventure than as a substantive record. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 14, 1969 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released September 25, 2015 | Parlophone UK

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Even though it contained no hits, The Man Who Sold the World, for most intents and purposes, was the beginning of David Bowie's classic period. Working with guitarist Mick Ronson and producer Tony Visconti for the second time Bowie developed a tight, twisted heavy guitar rock that appears simple on the surface but sounds more gnarled upon each listen. The mix is off-center, with the fuzz-bass dominating the compressed, razor-thin guitars and Bowie's strangled, affected voice. The sound of The Man Who Sold the World is odd, but the music itself is bizarre, with Bowie's weird, paranoid futuristic tales melded to Ronson's riffing and the band's relentless attack. Musically, there isn't much innovation on The Man Who Sold the World -- it is almost all hard blues-rock or psychedelic folk-rock -- but there's an unsettling edge to the band's performance, which makes the record one of Bowie's best albums. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Rhino - Parlophone

Originally issued in 1999 as a subscription-only release via Bowie's BowieNet website, this live album brings together tracks recorded on his 1997 Earthling Tour. The set includes songs performed in Amsterdam, Rio de Janeiro, New York, and at the Phoenix Festival in the U.K., with tracks coming from his Earthling and 1. Outside albums of the time. © Rich Wilson /TiVo

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David Bowie in the magazine
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