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Jazz - Released May 22, 2009 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released September 15, 1991 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
While greatest-hits albums from jazz artists are sometimes dubious propositions, Dave Brubeck is the rare exception to the rule. Brubeck concentrated on the song as much as the performance, which is one of the reasons why he appealed to such a wide audience and it's also the reason why Greatest Hits is such an entertaining and effective sampler. Featuring such familiar items as "Take Five," "In Your Own Sweet Way," "The Duke," "Trolley Song," "Unsquare Dance," and "Blue Rondo à la Turk," the collection provides a fine introduction to Brubeck's collegiate jazz for the uninitiated. Time Out remains the best place to start a Brubeck appreciation, but this is an excellent single-disc sampler. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Although a touch underrated, Jazz at Oberlin is one of the early Dave Brubeck classic recordings. The interplay between the pianist-leader and altoist Paul Desmond on "Perdido" borders on the miraculous, and their renditions of "The Way You Look Tonight," "How High the Moon" and "Stardust" are quite memorable. Brubeck's piano playing on "These Foolish Things" is so percussive and atonal in one spot as to sound like Cecil Taylor, who would not emerge for another two years. With bassist Ron Crotty and drummer Lloyd Davis giving the Quartet quiet and steady support, Brubeck and Desmond were free to play at their most adventurous. Highly recommended. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released September 25, 1990 | Columbia Jazz Masterpieces

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This CD, a straight reissue of the original LP, contains 11 songs written for the soundtrack of the long-forgotten television series Mr. Broadway. It pays tribute to New York in a more abstract way than Jazz Impressions of Japan celebrated Japan for Brubeck had to concern himself with having the music fit in with the show. In general these themes and the melodic improvisations of Brubeck and altoist Paul Desmond hold their own without the show although none of the songs became standards. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 15, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
During 1968-72, Brubeck's Quartet usually featured baritonist Gerry Mulligan, bassist Jack Six and drummer Alan Dawson. For this very logical record, altoist Paul Desmond (who was with Brubeck from 1951-67) makes the group a quintet and his interplay with Mulligan is consistently delightful. Together they are heard live in Europe on "Truth," Mulligan's "Unfinished Woman," "Rotterdam Blues" and a definitive 16-minute rendition of "Take Five." In addition, Desmond is showcased on "Koto Song" and as an encore Brubeck plays a lighthearted if brief "Sweet Georgia Brown." © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released November 12, 2010 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions Pianiste Maestro
Just in time for Dave Brubeck's 90th birthday celebration, Sony Legacy issues this double-disc compilation of tunes recorded between 1954 and 1970, beginning a year-long birthday campaign at the label and predating the screening of Dave Brubeck: In His Own Sweet Way, a documentary film whose executive producer is Clint Eastwood. (Another clebratory release, the Concord Music Group's the Definitive Dave Brubeck--also a double disc--covers the rest of his career before and after what is represented here.) Legacy of a Legend's 21 tunes were handpicked by the pianist. Of course his selections include favorites like "Take Five," "Blue Rondo à la Turk," "Jeepers Creepers," and his familiar takes on tunes from the movies and the theater, including "Gone with the Wind," and "Somewhere." Hardcore Brubeck fans will have almost everything here, but there is one previously unreleased cut, a live take of "Three to Get Ready" from the Dave Brubeck Quartet's final concert in 1967. That said, hearing this music assembled in this way offers startling proof of Brubeck's truly iconic genius for the musical depth and range he displays as a composer, arranger, and pianist, both live and in the studio. He revisits the haunting (and now legendary) "Thank You (Dziekuje)," recorded live in Poland with its gorgeous tribute to Chopin that is still provocative. The harmonic interplay between the pianist and Paul Desmond showcased on "Camptown Ladies" and "Something to Sing About" (to mention just two places) is furthered by the subtly insistent but utterly innovative rhythm section of Eugene Wright and Joe Morello. There are trio cuts here as well, and a couple of memorable vocal performances, too: there's Carmen McCrae fronting on "My One Bad Habit" from 1961's The Real Ambassadors and Louis Armstrong from the same album in an unusual setting with two pianists (Billy Kyle being the other) on "Summer Song." While there can be no arguing this is yet another compilation of Brubeck's material for Columbia, the quirky picks by the pianist provide a solid introduction for new listeners. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 20, 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released May 25, 1976 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
All the Things We Are is a bit unusual in the Dave Brubeck discography. The pianist is heard in a quartet with altoist Lee Konitz on "Like Someone in Love" and a brief "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," with avant-garde giant Anthony Braxton (also on alto) featured on "In Your Own Sweet Way," while both Konitz and Braxton team up for "All the Things You Are." In addition, the Brubeck Trio (with bassist Jack Six and drummer Alan Dawson) plays an exquisite and frequently exciting 21-minute, five-song "Jimmy Van Heusen Medley." A total success, this "experimental" Brubeck set is highly recommended. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released October 20, 1998 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
One of the better Dave Brubeck LPs from the later period of the Quartet with altoist Paul Desmond, this set is unusual in that it only contains one Brubeck original. On such tunes as "Cielito Lindo," the beautiful "La Paloma," "Besame Mucho" and "Estrellita," the Quartet is augmented by guitarist Chamin Correa and percussionist Rabito Agueros. The results are melodic but swinging treatments of a variety of famous themes. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 23, 1991 | Legacy - Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This excellent CD reissues the LP Brubeck Time plus half of Red Hot and Cool. One of the few early studio (as opposed to club) recordings by the early Dave Brubeck Quartet (this version has bassist Bob Bates and drummer Joe Dodge in addition to pianist Brubeck and altoist Paul Desmond), the fine unit performs nine standards plus three new compositions: "Stompin' for Mili," "Audrey" (dedicated to Audrey Hepburn) and Brubeck's classic, "The Duke." © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1990 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
One of Brubeck's three recordings of the 1959-61 period that featured clarinetist Bill Smith in the place of altoist Paul Desmond with the Quartet, this one finds Smith contributing ten originals that use various modes and unusual scales. The music generally swings and there are some fine solos but none of the individual pieces are all that memorable. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Dave Brubeck's second solo piano album differs from the first in that only two of the nine songs he performs are his originals. However Brubeck's versions of such standards as "Imagination," "Our Love Is Here to Stay" and "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" sound quite fresh and contain more than their share of surprises. Fortunately the formerly rare music is now available on this CD. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released September 28, 1998 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Four of the five selections on Brandenburg Gate: Revisited (1963) are new interpretations of Dave Brubeck (piano) classics scored by the pianist's older sibling, Howard Brubeck, who is likewise the author of the "G Flat Theme," which is offered here for the first time. By the time of this 1963 platter, the perpetually touring Dave Brubeck Quartet had played behind a few of the North America's finest ensembles -- commencing with a personal invitation extended by Robert Shaw and the San Diego Symphony in 1956. In fact, these expanded arrangements were actually done live before they were recorded in the studio. A similar fate befell material from Brubeck Plays Bernstein Plays Brubeck (1960), which was the Quartet's earlier orchestral collaboration. "Brandenburg Gate" has been significantly expanded from the version heard on Jazz Impressions of Eurasia (1958). The selection has developed into a side-long suite that includes substantial emotive counterpoint connecting the moody and contemplative strings and the swinging melodic contributions of Paul Desmond (alto sax), Eugene Wright (bass), and Joe Morello (drums). The subtle tension and liberation that exists between the two arguably disparate aggregates prevent either from overpowering the other. Likewise, spirited leads and improvisations from Brubeck and Desmond keep the elaborate piece agile and firmly rooted in jazz. "Summer Song" is given a stately update, reflecting the easygoing nature of the Jazz Impressions of the U.S.A. (1956) reading. Desmond once again reels off impressive lines that never detract from the tastefully understated string augmentation. The affective "In Your Own Sweet Way" has evolved from the piano solo that initially graced Brubeck Plays Brubeck (1956). The accompaniment is pronounced as it wafts beneath Brubeck's spontaneous chord progressions and nimbly executed keyboarding. As previously mentioned, "G Flat Theme" is the only tune debuted on Brandenburg Gate: Revisited. What begins as dark and melancholy dissipates into a mid-tempo groove that drives both Brubeck and Desmond into some very interesting spaces as they quickly adapt their sound to the slightly noir, but highly memorable chorus. "Kathy's Waltz" benefits from a more thorough examination, as compared to the Time Out (1959) rendering. There is a stately air present on this interpretation that remains conspicuously discreet on the more familiar outing. On the whole, of all the reworkings this one seems to be the most rewarding, especially as Desmond is backed with the lush full-bodied orchestra. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 15, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The Dave Brubeck-Gerry Mulligan quartet is heard in a very inspired performance at the Newport Jazz Festival, just a short time before a riot by the audience closed the festival. These versions of "Take Five" and "Open the Gates" are memorable, but it is the extended "Blues for Newport" that is truly classic. Mulligan and Brubeck (backed by bassist Jack Six and drummer Alan Dawson) constantly challenge each other during this exciting performance, making this set well-worth searching for. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Tenor-saxophonist Dave Van Kreidt, a former member of Dave Brubeck's octet in the late '40s, had a reunion with the pianist, altoist Paul Desmond and bassist Bob Bates for this unusual session; Brubeck's new drummer Joe Morello made the group a quintet. Van Kreidt supplied all of the compositions (some of which are fairly complex), giving this set a sound very much different than the usual Brubeck Quartet outing. Interesting if not essential classical-influenced music that predates the Third Stream movement. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 1996 | Telarc

Dave Brubeck covers a host of favorite carols on this solo outing. His chime-like "Joy to the World" and striding "Winter Wonderland" are treasures. His festive opening version of "Jingle Bells" contrasts with the weary version signaling the end of an evening's festivities; anyone who has ever worked a holiday party will relate to it. His originals include the delightful "Run, Run, Run to Bethlehem" and the meditative "To Us Is Given." This is a Christmas CD worth repeated hearings. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 10, 1982 | High Fidelity Masters

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Jazz - Released September 2, 2008 | Columbia - Legacy

Time In, issued in 1965, was the last of pianist and composer Dave Brubeck's "Time" recordings, and one of his most musically adventurous. Gone are the moody, silky textures and glissando moves of Time Out, or Time Further Out. In fact, of all the "Time" recordings, this is the least commercial and, in places, almost hard bop-oriented among them. This set goes beyond the entire West Coast idea as well. That's not to say there are no ballads -""Softly, William, Softly"" is one of the most gorgeous ballads Brubeck ever composed, with a memorable solo by Paul Desmond, who plays a slow, bluesy articulation over the pianist's augmented harmonic changes. But there's so much more. The title track has Stravinsky-esque chords that introduce a delicate theme, which disintegrates into a dissonant swing. There is also Brubeck variation on "Frankie and Johnnie," on "He Done Her Wrong." This track comes charging out of the box à la the Ramsey Lewis trio in a fit of pure one-four-five groove, with Desmond playing ostinato throughout the chorus. And here, Brubeck shows his love of tradition: Inside his solo, comprised of chords and striated intervallic figures that are just off the harmonic series, he never leaves the original behind; it is always readily evoked at any moment in the tune. The set closes with "Cassandra," a piece with sleight-of-hand rhythms and fleet soloing by the pianist and Desmond. Brubeck himself comes out of the melody with a series of 16th notes that blaze into 32nds before he comes back to the changes for Desmond. All the while, Joe Morello is triple-timing the band even in the slower passages just to keep the pulse on target as Gene Wright and Brubeck move all around the time figures to create a sense of space around Desmond's solo. Though it is seldom celebrated as such, this is one of Brubeck's finest moments on Columbia. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Telarc

It's not uncommon for anyone to turn toward nostalgia as the years wear on, and at age 86, with nearly 60 years of recording behind him and nearly 50 since he shook up the jazz world with his landmark Time Out album, Dave Brubeck is certainly entitled to look back and take stock of his life. Indian Summer -- the phrase itself suggests an acknowledgement of a waning in progress -- is something of a companion piece to 2004's Private Brubeck Remembers. Like that gem, Indian Summer is a solo piano work comprised of Brubeck's ruminations on standards of the mid-20th century, the period when he was just coming up as an artist and blossoming as a young man. These are reflective, meditative ballads, softly but skillfully played and hinting at melancholy. On time-worn Americana such as "Georgia on My Mind," "September Song," "Sweet Lorraine," and "Spring Is Here," Brubeck is restrained but soulful, out to prove nothing. It's not that age has dulled him; Brubeck's performance is uniformly exquisite, imaginative, and elegant; it's just not edgy. A small handful of original material nicely complements the standards, adding up to one of the more intimate entries in Brubeck's enormous discography. © Jeff Tamarkin /TiVo
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Miscellaneous - Released June 4, 2020 | Nostalgic Melody Music Production

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Dave Brubeck in the magazine
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