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Classical - Released November 6, 2012 | Dacapo SACD

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The ninth in a cycle of symphonies and other Mozart orchestral works by the veteran Hungarian conductor Adam Fischer, this release falls into a long tradition of rather dry Mozart that's characteristic of Central European conductors. The tradition is updated here by Fischer and the Danish National Chamber Orchestra, who succeed in producing something that's fresh and stands out from among the large crowd of Mozart symphony recordings on the market. Stylistic edges are smoothed down -- the Symphony No. 31 in D major, K. 297 ("Paris"), does not sound terribly French, and the outer movements of the two later symphonies are carefully controlled -- yet the performances are far from characterless. There's a lot of detail in the winds, leading often to a kind of brisk humor. Sample the very crisp, tense finale of the Symphony No. 33 in B flat major, K. 319, for a taste of Fischer's bracing style. One is reminded a bit of another Hungarian, George Szell, and his quip that "one does not pour chocolate sauce on asparagus" in response to someone who asked why he did not invest Mozart with more emotion. Fischer is alert to many small details, such as the foreshadowing of the "Jupiter" symphony finale in that of the Symphony No. 31. While this rather skittering Mozart may not be to all tastes, it's well worth hearing even for the most perfect Mozartian, with a spacious acoustic from the Dacapo label very well suited to the performers' aims. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 3, 2013 | Dacapo SACD

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Adam Fischer's audiophile series of the symphonies of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on Dacapo is a serious investment, perhaps recommendable only to listeners who like this music played on modern instruments in a rather brusque and cerebral style. The first volume, naturally enough, covers the short and simple symphonies the boy Mozart composed between 1764 and 1767, and the music is appealing in a naïve way, though not as involving as what he developed in the mature symphonies. As precocious as Mozart was, he was still writing under the tutelage of his father, Leopold Mozart, and the music often seems rudimentary and predictable. This SACD series is among the last recordings made before the Danish National Chamber Orchestra was dissolved in 2014, so there's value here for collectors of albums by this late lamented ensemble. However, unless one is determined to own the entire cycle, this is the least interesting volume and not essential for casual listeners, least of all in a market overflowing with brilliant Mozart recordings. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 5, 2013 | Dacapo SACD

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Classical - Released September 3, 2013 | Dacapo SACD

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Miscellaneous - Released November 5, 2013 | Dacapo SACD

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Classical - Released May 17, 2019 | Naxos

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Look through online reviews of conductor Ádám Fischer's Haydn and Mozart recordings with the Danish Chamber Orchestra, and you'll see a lot of five-star evaluations, and a lot of one-star judgments as well. He's just that kind of interpreter, and his Beethoven symphony cycle is more of the same, and perhaps even a bit more outrageous/inspired, depending on your point of view. The Fischer trademarks are all here: the fast tempos, the clipped phrases that seem to trail off (although this is very carefully controlled), the way of plowing through phrases without a hint of expressive shaping. The last of these suggests Fischer's priorities: he prizes large-scale structure over local effect, and his inner lines are as important as the melodies. The thing is, all these oddities are amplified in Beethoven, who usually isn't played by a chamber orchestra. In his own time, of course, the orchestras he worked with might have been closer to the Danish Chamber Orchestra's size than to the Berlin Philharmonic, and one way to look at Fischer's work is to consider that he may be stripping away Romantic accretions to the music. Sample the Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67, whose first movement hardly seems a titanic struggle with fate; of course, Beethoven never said it was anything of the sort, and Fischer's horns come through with what might have been something of the impact they had for Beethoven's audiences. A much-talked-about feature of this set is the presence of a countertenor, Morten Grove Frandsen, as a soloist in the finale of the Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125. Plainly this is ahistorical, but as it turns out, it makes only a subtle difference in the sound with all the other singers belting out their lines at top volume. Throughout, the players of the Danish Chamber Orchestra excel. They have worked with Fischer for a long time on interpretations like this, and they respond to him with a praiseworthy level of detail. One possible bottom line: if you enjoy hearing a conductor rethink music from the ground up, check this out, even above Fischer's other recordings. Another: the Ninth Symphony here has little of its grandly humanistic effect, which Beethoven surely intended. Lastly, as a technical accomplishment, these versions fall into a great European tradition. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 1, 2013 | Dacapo

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Originally released as separate hybrid SACDs between 2006 and 2013, Adam Fischer's recordings of the 45 symphonies of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart are reissued as standard CDs in this 12-disc box set from Dacapo. While audiophiles will want to collect the individual volumes for their exceptional clarity and depth, less particular listeners may be contented with the perfectly fine stereo reproduction of these discs. The main issue for all, however, is the style of Fischer's performances, in which he combines period performance practices and the modern instrumentation of the Danish National Chamber Orchestra, a compromise that is surprisingly effective and practical. Fischer's tempos are usually quick and his emphasis on energetic, even brusque, playing gives the symphonies a sharp edge, so there is little here that could be considered gemütlich. Rather, Fischer's approach has a certain dry, cerebral quality that encourages intellectual appreciation, and urges active exploration of the symphonies instead of listening for relaxation. © TiVo