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Electronic - Released June 24, 2021 | Mute

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Daniel Avery's Together in Static consists of material he composed for a pair of seated, socially distanced concerts at the Hackney Church in London. Continuing a prolific streak for the artist, it arrives the year following a collaboration with Alessandro Cortini (Illusion of Time) and the surprise-released solo effort Love + Light. Even more so than his other albums, this is decidedly a reflective set designed for home listening, with much of the material in ambient or downtempo mode. A thumping industrial techno track called "Yesterday Faded" appears early in the program, and its tough, craggy beats are surrounded by soft, atmospheric synths like a layer of mist partially obscuring a massive iceberg. "Nowhere Sound" is much closer to the Casino Versus Japan/Ulrich Schnauss school of downtempo IDM, with slightly tangy synths shining over slo-mo beats. "Fountain of Peace" seems like an exaggeration of trip-hop, with an absurdly blown-out, hissy drum loop and synths that seem to be reaching deep inside one's soul; the effect is both soothing and bludgeoning. Recalling early-'90s ambient techno at its most melancholy, "A Life That Is Your Own" also has a mystical vibe, but isn't sludgy. "Hazel and Gold" is much sunnier, sounding like an attempt to leave fear and tragedy in the past and look on the bright side. The only other uptempo track on the album, "Endless Hours," has more focused, energetic beats than "Yesterday Faded," and overall it seems more determined and motivated. The gorgeous closer "The Midnight Sun" is a straight-up flashback to the Artificial Intelligence era, and without getting bombastic, its optimism seems to outshine the lingering darkness of the rest of the record. Considering how quickly the album came together, it feels like a spontaneous rush to translate the emotions of being away from dance clubs for a year into music, with hope and anticipation winning in the end. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released October 7, 2013 | Phantasy

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After a string of impressive singles and an exciting entry in the Fabriclive series, techno producer Daniel Avery's debut album Drone Logic fulfills all the promise of his early work and delivers something pretty special. Inspired by classic albums by the likes of the Chemical Brothers and Underworld, which were more than just a seemingly random series of tracks strung together and more a kind of listening experience where the sounds, moods, and beats ebb, flow, and build into a cohesive whole, Avery aims very high here. Taking elements from a wide range of electronic styles from acid house and classic Detroit techno to IDM and electro, throwing in some unexpected hints of shoegaze and Neu!, and always making sure to weld mind-expanding melodies onto his alternately soothing and slamming beats, Avery has crafted an album that equals his inspirations and definitely rewards repeated spins. The extremely precise care and feeding of both the rhythms and bleepy synth melodies give the album depth, making it easy to sink deeply into the album's warm textures. Even though almost every song breaks the six-minute mark, there's never a moment of boredom or a time when you start to wonder what the next song sounds like. Avery's skills as a producer and songwriter keep you riveted to the matters at hand, whether you're dancing to the bouncing beats of jams like "All I Need" or drifting off on an inner space journey on songs like the very Autechre-sounding "Free Floating" or the burbling "Need Electric." Even when the beats are tightly wound and punchy, the overall musical equation is tilted more toward the introspective side, with a predominance of melancholy bleeps, chopped-up vocals, and an overall lost-in-thought feeling that gives the album a weighty feel and makes a deep imprint on the listener's brain. That Avery is able to get this deep while still making sure the songs, and therefore the album, have a gently propulsive forward motion is the trick that makes the album something worth exploring. The more you do, the more you'll discover, and the stronger its grip on you will become. The times have changed enough in the music world that Drone Logic won't get the same recognition and acclaim that albums by Underworld or the Chemical Brothers (or even Plastikman or Orbital) received 20 years previously, but it's every bit as good and expansively musical as anything from that era. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Electronic - Released November 11, 2016 | !K7 Records

"‘A Mechanical Sky’ is the mix’s second half curveball, invading the monochrome palette with a burst of acid....‘Space Echo’ is a dark, dubby ambient piece that keeps things cinematic as the mix recedes out of the light." © TiVo
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Electronic - Released June 26, 2020 | Mute

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Three months after his album Illusion of Time with Italian ambient musician (and Nine Inch Nails keyboard player) Alessandro Cortini, Daniel Avery has made a sudden return, this time with Love + Light. The album was put together and sent straight to press for Erol Alkan's eclectic label Phantasy Records, with neither marketing nor promotion. When explaining the decision to release the album this way, Avery stated, “[it] felt like a decision made by an outside force yet one I agreed with entirely". This ‘outside force’ clearly had it right as everything is perfectly in place on this two-part album. Love, the first part, is a dancefloor record made up of hazy techno, dark 90s sounds (Dusting for Smoke) and occasionally dreamy atmospheres (Dream Distortion). It climaxes with Darlinnn, a trancey tune composed with Avery's labelmate Ghost Culture, who is credited as a writer on three quarters of the tracks. The record is flavoured with interludes of ambient music (Katana) and noisier passages (Searing Light, Forward Motion, with Wolverhampton producer Manni Dee). “This record has been a real positive force of energy in my life, to the point where it almost formed itself in front of me”, Daniel Avery explained. Everything becomes clear upon listening to the second part, Light, which is a much more down-tempo record that moves between electronic arabesques (Fuzzwar) and the cosmic odysseys of A Story in E5 and One More Morning, the latter of which closes the album by setting us afloat down a river in search of light. Truly a heaven-sent record.
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Lounge - Released April 6, 2018 | Mute

Daniel Avery's astounding 2013 full-length Drone Logic tested the boundaries of what could be considered club music, adding shoegaze-like distortion and IDM experimentation to a heady mix of propulsive techno and electro, earning heaps of comparisons to electronic music's most celebrated acts during the '90s without directly aping them. Long-awaited follow-up Song for Alpha goes even further left-field, with the artist chiefly inspired by the more reflective moments of the clubgoing experience, resulting in another album which blurs the line between home listening and DJ ammo. There's no shortage of steady, hypnotic beats here, but this album seems more abstract and hazy compared to the electro-influenced club singles included on Drone Logic. Tracks such as "Stereo L" and "Slow Fade" are midtempo acid-ambient baths, weaving scintillating webs of cerebral beats and swirling fuzz. The latter track was given a typically otherworldly remix by Actress prior to the album's release, and it's not hard to liken the hissy, distant thump of cuts like "Projector" and "Sensation" to his work. While Drone Logic contained several appearances by Kelly Lee Owens, who has since become a star in her own right, this one only limits vocals to two brief, vaporous interludes. Instead of more overtly melodic, indie-friendly club tracks like "Knowing We'll Be Here," Alpha is primarily made up of potent audio hallucinogens like "Diminuendo" (which could pass for a remix of Teste's 1992 classic "The Wipe") or "Clear," which adds a flooding rush of distortion to pleasantly dancing astral synth loops. It might take more listens to connect with Alpha than with Drone Logic, but it's just as powerful and fascinating. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 27, 2020 | Mute

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Electronic - Released November 24, 2020 | Mute

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Electronic - Released January 30, 2020 | Mute

Illusion of Time is the result of several years' worth of collaboration between techno producer/DJ Daniel Avery and analog synth master Alessandro Cortini (a member of Nine Inch Nails). The two developed ideas remotely, previewing the fruits of their labor with a limited single available at a festival in 2017, then convened in a hotel room while Avery was touring with NIN in 2018, completing the album in a matter of hours. The release is far removed from Avery's hazy, acid-bath techno, but minus the propulsive beats, his frayed, shoegaze-like textures are unmistakable, and mesh well with Cortini's isolated electronics. The album veers between haunting, slightly apocalyptic moodscapes and more reflective moments that are almost soothing, yet there's still an unshakeable sense of melancholy throughout. Illusion of Time's title track is certainly one of its more refreshing pieces, with a gorgeous, Cluster-like keyboard melody drenched in trippy delay, but instead of making it sound clear and cloudless, they cover it in a wash of hiss and distortion. "At First Sight" similarly buries a lonesome yet irrepressible melody in thick fog, like a battered heart that refuses to break down completely. A steady, gentle analog synth pulse frames the lapping waves of feedback during "Enter Exit," and while the track generally feels a bit chaotic but hopeful, "Inside the Ruins" has a similar push/pull effect yet sounds much more desolate and closer to the brink of destruction. Close to the end of the album is "Water," an astonishingly pretty piece of shimmering drone-gaze that originally appeared as the A-side of the duo's 2017 single. (The much darker B-side, "Sun," is sequenced as the full-length's foreboding intro.) Illusion of Time fittingly sounds rougher and more spontaneous than any of Avery's work or Cortini's preceding recordings, particularly his 2019 Mute release Volume Massimo, but its highlights seem to pull divine inspiration out of practically nothing. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2018 | Mute

"On his introspective new four-track EP, SLOW FADE, Avery finds as much drama in the negative spaces as in the concrete forms." © TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 2, 2015 | Phantasy

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Electronic - Released September 1, 2020 | Mute

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Electronic - Released April 5, 2019 | Mute

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Electronic - Released April 15, 2021 | Mute

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Electronic - Released May 20, 2021 | Mute

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Dance - Released October 12, 2018 | Mute

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Electronic - Released November 11, 2016 | !K7 Records

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Electronic - Released June 16, 2014 | Phantasy

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Electronic - Released July 6, 2018 | Mute

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House - Released January 1, 2018 | Mute

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Electronic - Released November 11, 2013 | Phantasy