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Electronic/Dance - Released May 8, 2020 | Dome Of Doom

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 20, 2019 | Brainfeeder

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Electronic/Dance - Released April 21, 2020 | Dome Of Doom

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 29, 2014 | Brainfeeder

Opening with a bit of Lord Tennyson's poem The Charge of the Light Brigade, Daedelus' 15th long-player was inspired by the Crimean War, but it doesn't evoke death, despair, or destruction. Quite the contrary, The Light Brigade is the multi-genre producer in a serene mode, employing harp, nylon-string guitars, and collaborator Young Dad's cooing vocals for a landscape that only represents the battlefield for those well into their morphine drips. "Onward" is what the Civil Wars would sound like if they freed themselves from songs and just went for "feel"; then "The Victory of the Echo Over the Voice" is as precious and violent as its title, which is to say "yes" for the first and "no" for the latter. "Pre-Munitions" is like three flamenco guitarists giggling through their instruments, while "Baba Yaga" comes on with the poise of a rich Windham Hill cut delivered in the new age label's prime. Laid end to end, the album offers a cool, breezy getaway to a land where one reflects on the nice bits and forgets all the rest; that's until the grave closer "Country of Conquest" comes on with its sobering strings and low tones. Barely any of it fits into the "left-field hip-hop" category, although the album carries the crate-crawler spirit of creating new moods through borrowed music. Don't sweat the concept because if war is hell, The Light Brigade is almost the opposite. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 22, 2010 | Brainfeeder

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Electronic/Dance - Released June 2, 2008 | Ninja Tune

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 28, 2016 | Magical Properties

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 8, 2007 | Ninja Tune

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Experimental - Released June 10, 2003 | Mush

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Electronic/Dance - Released May 25, 2018 | Magical Properties

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 26, 2006 | Alpha Pup Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released June 9, 2008 | Ninja Tune

On his 2006 album Denies the Day's Demise, Daedelus created a sunny whirl of chirpy electronics, frothy samples, and pervasive Brazilian influences that was arguably the best record of his career. Proving that he's not content to make the same record over and over, on 2008's Love to Make Music To Daedelus strips back his sound a bit (a tiny bit) and pumps up the jams a lot. Using a bunch of guest appearances from rappers and vocalists and a beat-heavy sound, he's focused more on the dancefloor than in the past. Instead of just making a straight-up party record, though, the same sense of lighthearted, anything goes soundcraft flows through the album like great bolts of sunshine. Try as he might to make hedonistic, druggy tunes, Daedelus can't help throwing in every sonic idea that might (or might not) fit into his songs, turning them into wonderfully top-heavy and warped jams that hit both your feet and your brain equally. Even the silliest song on the record, "Bass It In" (nice Buffalo Gals sample!), features vocals that are sped up and slowed down at random, making it impossible to enjoy without noticing how clever the production is. And the production is clever. Also, smart and fun and thrillingly daft. In other words, just like every other Daedelus album. Mixed in with the party jams are a couple of more thoughtful tracks (like the melancholy "Only for the Heartstrings" and the fractured New Order tribute "Make It So") that give the record some dynamic flow. The various guest appearances add some variety, too. The rapping from Sa-Ra's Taz Arnold on a couple tracks, the soulful vocals from Paperboy and Erika Rose (on the almost radio-ready "My Beau"), and vocodered harmonies from Laura Darling on the icy smooth "If We Should" are all positive additions to the album. N'fa's innocuous verses on "Twist the Kids" are a definite negative, though. Luckily, they are the only blot on an otherwise excellent record. Love to Make Music To may not be the best Daedelus album, but it's not far from it -- and that makes it just about the best electronic pop you are likely to hear in 2008. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 21, 2011 | Ninja Tune

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 25, 2019 | Magical Properties

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 17, 2013 | Magical Properties

Daedelus' thirteenth album and first outing for Anticon finds the Los Angeles electronica veteran continuing to cleverly splice up ambient textures into bouncy beats. Unlike prior releases, there are no guest vocalists on this one, and hyper-compressed synthesizer swells play a bigger part, giving all the instrumentals a pumping pulse. Surprisingly, electric guitar loops come into play this time around, too. He shows off his greatest talent throughout, however, and proves himself a master of tricking out a wide variety of samples, from a swirling choir singing John Dowland's "Come Again! Sweet Love Doth Now Invite" in the mighty "Tiptoes," to a chopped-and-screwed version of 2Pac's "I Get Around" in "Keep Still," to a field recording of skateboarders grinding curbs on "Music Concrete." The album is wonderful background music, with its light and airy style of skittering digital beats and symphonic sound bites. Also worth noting is how Drown Out manages a live quality, not found on most releases from electronic producers who use out-of-the-box laptop software, and this is due to Daedelus' unique "on the fly" style of creating, which involves the punching of pads on of his custom-made bit box controller. Anyone lucky enough to catch his live show knows he is one of the most animated electronic performers in the game, and this energy transfers over to the soundscape of this recording relatively well. It's the type of album that will be most apt to impress aspiring producers, but also hip enough that it could serve as a backing soundtrack for a dinner party too. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
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Experimental - Released October 3, 2006 | Mush

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Electronic/Dance - Released February 24, 2004 | Magical Properties

The second full-length album from this enigmatic Santa Monica DJ/producer continues his exploration of curiously pleasant post-electronic musique concrète. "Post-electronic," because his source material tends to be analog rather than digital -- accordions, reed instruments, toy percussion, and samples from old LPs covering a wide variety of musical styles. But while Daedelus' music partakes of the collage aesthetic of 20th-century musique concrète, the results are invariably easy on the ear, and sometimes quite melodically sophisticated even when the rhythms are jungly or the textures glitchy. The interaction of jittery drum'n'bass rhythms, and bass clarinet on "Scaling Snowdon" is one such example, as is the funky but sweet 1970s movie-soundtrack flavor of "Taking Wing." "Overdressed" flirts with chaotic drill'n'bass, but in a gentle way, and the similarly quirky "Was Waiting" flirts with being an actual song, but in a rather demented way. The whole album leaves you feeling a bit bewildered, but strangely happy. How Daedelus does this is a mystery, and it would probably be best if it remained one. © Rick Anderson /TiVo
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 15, 2005 | Magical Properties

Daedelus' fourth album finds the Santa Monica-based producer at the peak of his considerable powers. Exquisite Corpse is a near perfect blend of the densely packed, sample heavy, nearly symphonic electronica and off-kilter hip-hop that the last three albums have featured. The main difference here is that for the first time a Daedelus record is loaded up with collaborations; MF Doom, Prefuse 73, Mike Ladd, French rappers TTC and Laura Darling among others, and while a few of them add some luster to the proceedings (MF Doom unspools a typically unhinged rap on the hilarious "Impending Doom," Mike Ladd drops a typically heavy rap into the melancholy and political "Welcome Home") for the most part the guests don't add or subtract much from the sound of the album. That sound is a clattering and sparkling blend of junk shop sampladelica, post-rock sound sculptures, fractured experimental techno and underground hip-hop that will have you clutching the arms of your chair as the record lurches and whirls from one song to the next. Just trying to wrap your head around a track like "Just Briefly" with its glitchy string samples, ghostly vocals piped in from some old opera record, mumbled bits of raps and a Can-like rhythmic drive is enough entertainment to justify the cost of the disc. That almost each track has the same exuberant feeling, brilliant construction and whacked-out sense of glee makes the record an unfettered joy to listen to. Only a couple of tracks like "Drops," the collaboration with rapper Cyne that suffers from less than inspired rapping, and "The Crippled Hand," which goes on too long, are less than wonderful. Along with Prefuse 73, Dabrye, Jason Forrest and a few others, Daedelus is keeping experimental techno (or whatever you want to call it) alive with records like this, records full of humor, brains, passion and breathtaking sounds. Exquisite Corpse definitely lives up to half of its title and you would have to be the other half to pass up a chance to check it out. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Electronic/Dance - Released November 1, 2012 | Magical Properties

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Electronic/Dance - Released April 8, 2020 | Dome Of Doom

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