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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 28, 2018 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Eight years have passed since the Californians of Cypress Hill’s last album yet the band are still all over the scene, both with solo projects and collaborations. Cypress Hill’s energy on stage is unparalleled, which guarantees them a place at most festivals around the world. The promise of this new album, “Elephants on Acid”, is primarily based on the return of DJ Muggs, their brilliant producer, who is picking up right where he left off, between sixties psychedelics, blazing breakbeats and smoky mysticism. Just like on the very detailed gothic album cover, Muggs unearths a monster buried deep underground and resurrects the legend of “Temple of Boom”, the band’s labyrinth album released in 1995. Between drugs and spirituality, B-Real, the main rapper, reinterprets Cypress Hill’s rather dark repertoire, halfway between Los Angeles Latino culture and hallucinating fantasy à la H.P. Lovecraft. With a few more recreational tracks like “Crazy” or “Oh Na Na”, which make the group sound like a mutant gypsy marching band, Cypress Hill are revitalised, though slightly removed from the saturated guitars of their earlier releases. Ending on “Stairway To Heaven” which is reminiscent of the ethereal soul of Portishead or Massive Attack, “Elephants on Acid” is a multi-layered journey around the mind, in which listeners can both lose and find themselves. © Aurélien Chapuis/Qobuz
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 16, 1993 | Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 13, 1991 | Ruffhouse - Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
It's hard enough to transform an entire musical genre -- Cypress Hill's eponymous debut album revolutionized hip-hop in several respects. Although they weren't the first Latino rappers, nor the first to mix Spanish and English, they were the first to achieve a substantial following, thanks to their highly distinctive sound. Along with Beastie Boys and Public Enemy, Cypress Hill were also one of the first rap groups to bridge the gap with fans of both hard rock and alternative rock. And, most importantly, they created a sonic blueprint that would become one of the most widely copied in hip-hop. In keeping with their promarijuana stance, Cypress Hill intentionally crafted their music to sound stoned -- lots of slow, lazy beats, fat bass, weird noises, and creepily distant-sounding samples. The surreal lyrical narratives were almost exclusively spun by B Real in a nasal, singsong, instantly recognizable delivery that only added to the music's hazy, evocative atmosphere; as a frontman, he could be funny, frightening, or just plain bizarre (again, kind of like the experience of being stoned). Whether he's taunting cops or singing nursery rhyme-like choruses about blasting holes in people with shotguns, B Real's blunted-gangsta posture is nearly always underpinned by a cartoonish sense of humor. It's never clear how serious the threats are, but that actually makes them all the more menacing. The sound and style of Cypress Hill was hugely influential, particularly on Dr. Dre's boundary-shattering 1992 blockbuster The Chronic; yet despite its legions of imitators, Cypress Hill still sounds fresh and original today, simply because few hip-hop artists can put its sound across with such force of personality or imagination. ~ Steve Huey
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 10, 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 25, 2000 | Columbia

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 28, 2018 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

Thirty years into any music career, the pressure is generally off. Cypress Hill, active since 1988 and best known for their weed-friendly gangsta rap hits from the '90s, could easily rewrite and revisit the ideas that made them famous for the rest of their days and fans would delight in the familiarity. Certainly, Elephants on Acid, Cypress Hill's ninth studio album and first since 2010's Rise Up, is full of their trademarks -- hits from the bong, puffed-up bravado, and ominously creepy flows or sunny stoned soliloquies. Less expected is a creative rebirth from a cartoonish crew that could rest on their past accomplishments and enjoy life as a legacy act. Elephants on Acid is just that, however, a deeply imaginative and risky set of new material from a group of old heads still interested in pushing their craft to new places. The 21-track album is the first collection produced by DJ Muggs since 2004's 'Til Death Do Us Part. Muggs' signature siren squalls and booming bass have morphed into a drifting, psychedelic treasure chest here, with trippy beats meeting multiple instrumental interludes. Some sessions for the album took place in Egypt, where Muggs not only hired street performers to play sitar, oud, flute, and other live instruments, but also worked with Egyptian pop vocalists Sadat and Alaa Fifty Cent who sing the chorus for single "Band of Gypsies." B Real's wheezing rhymes here are standard, but the backdrop of searing guitar solos and hazy, loping percussion put a psychedelic filter on the song informed by both the country where it was recorded and a heavy classic rock influence. Adventurous production on the cloudy, organ-heavy "Jesus Was a Stoner" and the horror-movie-soundtrack-anxiety of "Pass the Knife" are eons ahead of the frantic stoner rap the group made their name on. Repeat listens locate Muggs at the core of the album's creative push. He built the tracks here mostly from scratch, using a single Hiroshima sample and otherwise working with other musicians or playing all of the instruments himself, resampling his own work until it sounded like the worn-out vinyl sources he grew up working with. Elephants on Acid breaks new ground for Cypress Hill, but they don't commit entirely to an artistic about face. Pressure cooker tracks like "Put Em in the Ground" and "Locos" split the difference between Muggs' sonic exploration and the group's time-tested approach. There's a cheese factor here, as well. Formulaic romps like "Crazy" and "Through the Rabbit Hole" are pandering, cobbled together from tired big beats and too-stoned lyrics. They aim for the zany energy of the group's glory days but land closer to Insane Clown Posse levels of mediocrity. Ultimately, superfans might be polarized by the experimental musings of Elephants on Acid, but those with some distance will find this curiously assembled collection pleasantly puzzling in its layers of trippy appeal. Something this unexpected from such an established act can't help but feel refreshing. ~ Fred Thomas
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 3, 2018 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2010 | Priority Records

Cypress Hill's first album for Priority -- released under Snoop Dogg’s tenure as the label's creative director -- is a four-years-in-the-making, against-all-odds success that earns its victory march cover art, at least for the most part. There are a couple merely good tracks -- “Pass the Dutch” being the most merely good -- that act as speed bumps on this otherwise exciting ride, which in typical Cypress Hill style, ramps up on the hater-slaying tracks and chills out on the weed numbers. Best of the former is the title track with special guest Tom Morello from Rage Against the Machine, while the best of the latter is the strain-listing “K.U.S.H.” produced by B Real and Cypress-associate Sick Jacken. Somewhere in between is the slay-and-toke “Light It Up” where B-Real offers “I eat MCs up, you might wanna ease up/I squeeze on the trigger like I squeeze on a C-cup,” while producer Pete Rock brings the soul with a Barry White sample. Usual producer Muggs only turns in two cuts, one being the dusty-sounding heart wrencher “Take My Pain” with Everlast on the bluesy chorus. Other genres like emo-rap (“Carry Me Away” with Mike Shinoda), crunching rock-rap (“Trouble Seeker” with Daron Malakian), and spicy Latin rap (“Armada Latina” with Pitbull, Marc Anthony, and a sweet Stephen Stills sample) are explored then conquered, and in spite of all these flavors and guest artists, the album remains Cypress’, or at least B Real’s, as the group’s leader is more dominant than ever. At 15-songs long the album can stand tall after the required trimming, making Rise Up a giant leap in the right direction after the lukewarm Till Death Do Us Part. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 1, 2005 | Columbia

The first proper "best-of" from Cypress Hill arrives nearly 15 years after their debut, a surprisingly long time considering how compilation-happy their parent label, Sony, has been. Whatever the reason for it, the wait for this comp was entirely worth it, since Greatest Hits from the Bong is filled with top-notch tracks and saves the consumer from having to purchase the group's disappointing albums -- Temples of Boom, IV -- while leaving enough of their classics -- Skull & Bones, Black Sunday, and their nearly perfect debut -- unheard until the decision is made to dig further. The mostly chronological layout may seem dry, but it displays the growth of the group and all the risk-taking and genre-blending that happened along the way. Raw gangsta tracks and hedonistic odes to pot smoking give way to reggae-influenced numbers, layered Clash samples, and more intricate smoking songs. Two new tracks toward the end -- the Ambrosia-sampling "The Only Way" and the tight and hardcore "EZ Come EZ Go" -- offer something new for the regulars and while "EZ" is very good, "Only Way" is a hooky triumph. Including the reggaeton remix of "Latin Thugs" with Tego Calderón is a very 2005 move, but it's a hot track and if there ever were a hip-hop act that seemed a natural for the reggaeton explosion, it's this Latin, reggae-loving crew. With a running time of less than 50 minutes and the lack of an essay or words from the band, Greatest Hits from the Bong isn't perfect, but being all killer and no filler, it's close enough. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 25, 2000 | Columbia

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 24, 2018 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 1, 1993 | Ruffhouse

Black Sunday made Cypress Hill's connection to rock & roll more explicit, with its heavy metal-like artwork and noisier, more dissonant samples (including, naturally, stoner icons Black Sabbath). It's a slightly darker affair than its groundbreaking predecessor, with the threats of violence more urgent and the pot obsession played to the hilt (after all, it was a crucial part of their widespread appeal). Apart from those subtle distinctions, the sound of Black Sunday is pretty much the same as Cypress Hill, refining the group's innovations into an accessible bid for crossover success. In fact, it's a little startling how often Black Sunday recycles musical ideas and even lyrical catch phrases from the endlessly inventive debut. And the rock-derived, verse-chorus song structures start to sound a little formulaic by the end of the record (how many choruses feature Sen Dog repeating part of whatever B Real just said?). But in spite of that, Black Sunday still sounds vital and lively, since the group has a surer sense of craft. Most of the tracks are fleshed out into structured songs, in contrast to the brief sketches that punctuated Cypress Hill. The album benefits immensely from the resulting clutch of excellent singles (and songs that could have been), and while a couple of tracks feel redundant and underdeveloped, Black Sunday is overall a consistent, engaging listen, especially the flawless first half or so. Unfortunately, it's also the group's last great album, thanks to the musical recycling operation that began here and would handicap much of their subsequent work. ~ Steve Huey
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 1, 1993 | Ruffhouse - Columbia

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 13, 2006 | Columbia

The first proper "best-of" from Cypress Hill arrives nearly 15 years after their debut, a surprisingly long time considering how compilation-happy their parent label, Sony, has been. Whatever the reason for it, the wait for this comp was entirely worth it, since Greatest Hits from the Bong is filled with top-notch tracks and saves the consumer from having to purchase the group's disappointing albums -- Temples of Boom, IV -- while leaving enough of their classics -- Skull & Bones, Black Sunday, and their nearly perfect debut -- unheard until the decision is made to dig further. The mostly chronological layout may seem dry, but it displays the growth of the group and all the risk-taking and genre-blending that happened along the way. Raw gangsta tracks and hedonistic odes to pot smoking give way to reggae-influenced numbers, layered Clash samples, and more intricate smoking songs. Two new tracks toward the end -- the Ambrosia-sampling "The Only Way" and the tight and hardcore "EZ Come EZ Go" -- offer something new for the regulars and while "EZ" is very good, "Only Way" is a hooky triumph. Including the reggaeton remix of "Latin Thugs" with Tego Calderón is a very 2005 move, but it's a hot track and if there ever were a hip-hop act that seemed a natural for the reggaeton explosion, it's this Latin, reggae-loving crew. With a running time of less than 50 minutes and the lack of an essay or words from the band, Greatest Hits from the Bong isn't perfect, but being all killer and no filler, it's close enough. ~ David Jeffries
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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 7, 2017 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 14, 2018 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 1, 1995 | Ruffhouse - Columbia

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 31, 1995 | Ruffhouse - Columbia

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 2, 2010 | Columbia

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2010 | Priority Records