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Pop - Released January 23, 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released May 29, 1969 | Rhino Atlantic

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Recorded at Wally Heider's Studio III in Los Angeles and first released 29 May, 1969 on Atlantic Records, this album was remastered in 2012 and reissued in Hi-Res. This Crosby, Stills & Nash self-titled debut album is one of the true masterpieces of the rock'n'roll canon. 
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Pop - Released October 9, 2012 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released January 23, 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

The Crosby, Stills & Nash triumvirate shot to immediate superstardom with the release of its self-titled debut LP, a sparkling set immortalizing the group's amazingly close, high harmonies. While elements of the record haven't dated well -- Nash's Eastern-influenced musings on the hit "Marrakesh Express" now seem more than a little silly, while the antiwar sentiments of "Wooden Ships," though well-intentioned, are rather hokey -- the harmonies are absolutely timeless, and the best material remains rock-solid. Stills' gorgeous opener, "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes," in particular, is an epic love song remarkable in its musical and emotional intricacy, Nash's "Pre-Road Downs" is buoyant folk-pop underpinned by light psychedelic textures, and Crosby's "Long Time Gone" remains a potent indictment of the assassination of Robert Kennedy. A definitive document of its era. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Pop - Released March 14, 2005 | Rhino

Rhino/Atlantic's 2005 compilation Greatest Hits collects the hits and signature songs of Crosby, Stills & Nash -- not Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, which is a subtle difference, and one that would seem to make a greater difference than it actually does. Apart from their debut, CSN always was a bigger deal -- more popular, more critically respected -- when Neil Young was on board, but he only cut one studio album with them in the '70s, so there aren't that many songs from CSNY that really would have made the cut on a Greatest Hits. Then again, CSN themselves didn't cut that many studio albums during their late-'60s/'70s peak. Just three: 1969's eponymous debut, 1970's Déjà Vu with Young, and 1977's CSN. If you were charitable, you could count 1982's Daylight Again as the coda to that peak, since it did produce two excellent (and big) hits in "Wasted on the Way" and "Southern Cross," and it feels more of a piece with the group's classic work than the quartet of albums from 1988 to 1999. That is certainly the perspective taken on this 19-track compilation, which concentrates entirely on material from Crosby, Stills & Nash, Déjà Vu, CSN, and Daylight Again. Even if this means that charting singles from 1988's American Dream and 1990's Live It Up are missing, it does make for a better listen than if they were forced into this set. That said, there are still a couple of major songs missing -- Young's "Helpless" and "Ohio," of course, but also "Woodstock," "Fair Game," and "Almost Cut My Hair" -- but the great majority of the big hits and signature songs are here. When broken down to sheer numbers, this contains seven of the ten songs from Crosby, Stills & Nash, five of the 12 from CSN, four from Daylight Again, and three from Déjà Vu, making this a generous, well-balanced collection that will satisfy the tastes of those who want a good overview of CSN's biggest and best. It may not have everything -- you'll need Déjà Vu or So Far or perhaps just Neil Young's Greatest Hits for that -- but it has enough to be satisfying. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 10, 2012 | CSN Records

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CSN

Rock - Released September 6, 1994 | Atlantic Records

The times had certainly changed since Déjà Vu's release in 1970. Nevertheless, there was a hunger in audiences for a return to the harmony-soaked idealism with which the trio had been catapulted to popularity, and CSN consequently reached number two on the charts, behind Fleetwood Mac's megasuccessful Rumours. The music here is very good, though probably not up to the hard-to-match level of Crosby, Stills & Nash or Déjà Vu. Still, the songs showed a great deal of lyrical maturity and compositional complexity compared to those earlier albums (from a far more innocent time). "Just a Song Before I Go" was the latest of Graham Nash's radio-friendly acoustic numbers, and a Top Ten single. "See the Changes" and "Dark Star" ranked with the best of Stephen Stills' work, while David Crosby contributed three classics from his distinctive oeuvre: "Shadow Captain," "Anything at All," and the beautiful "In My Dreams." Nash's multi-part "Cathedral," a recollection of an acid trip taken in Winchester Cathedral on his 32nd birthday, became a staple of the group's live repertoire. CSN was the trio's last fully realized album, and also the last recording on which the three principals handled all the vocal parts without the sweetening of additional voices. It has held up remarkably well, both as a memento of its time and as a thoroughly enjoyable musical work. © Jim Newsom /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 1, 2009 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released January 23, 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

The Crosby, Stills & Nash triumvirate shot to immediate superstardom with the release of its self-titled debut LP, a sparkling set immortalizing the group's amazingly close, high harmonies. While elements of the record haven't dated well -- Nash's Eastern-influenced musings on the hit "Marrakesh Express" now seem more than a little silly, while the antiwar sentiments of "Wooden Ships," though well-intentioned, are rather hokey -- the harmonies are absolutely timeless, and the best material remains rock-solid. Stills' gorgeous opener, "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes," in particular, is an epic love song remarkable in its musical and emotional intricacy, Nash's "Pre-Road Downs" is buoyant folk-pop underpinned by light psychedelic textures, and Crosby's "Long Time Gone" remains a potent indictment of the assassination of Robert Kennedy. A definitive document of its era. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 23, 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

Although Crosby, Stills & Nash had, in effect, been together for well over a decade when Daylight Again (1982) was issued, it was only their third studio long-player of concurrently new material. Initially, the project began as a collaborative effort between Stephen Stills (guitar/banjo/keyboards/percussion/vocals) and Graham Nash (guitar/keyboards/percussion/vocals), as David Crosby was descending into a self-induced state of perpetual drug dependency. However, Crosby was included, although arguably in name alone, and his hauntingly lyrical "Delta" stands as one of his finest contributions. Perhaps the most telling element in the trio's state of affairs was the addition of the Eagles' Timothy B. Schmit and CSN bandmember Mike Finnigan (keyboards/vocals) on vocals throughout. Despite that obvious setback, the other two primary namesakes supply some genuine and uniformly excellent material to the proceedings. Among the most notable are Nash's "Wasted on the Way" -- which was lyrically an ode to the status of the group's union -- and Stills' collaboration with the Curtis Brothers on "Southern Cross." Both were extracted as singles and became among the best-known tracks not only on Daylight Again, but also in the post-'60s CSN canon. The disc also includes a few thoroughly affective ballads such as "Song for Susan" -- which Nash wrote for his spouse -- and Stills' equally emotive "You Are Alive." By contrast, the album's opener, "Turn Your Back on Love," as well as "Too Much Love to Hide" and "Since I Met You" are all up-tempo, full-throttle rockers co-composed by Stills, and include some of the guitarist's most blistering fretwork under the CSN moniker. The disc concludes with Stills' lone solo composition on the album -- a two-part track marrying the newly penned Civil War elegy to a chorus of the 1970 anthem "Find the Cost of Freedom." Again, Crosby's absence is noted with the incorporation of Art Garfunkel's vocals where Crosby's should have been. Daylight Again is by no means as insipid as their next studio effort, Live It Up (1990). In the wake of their eponymously titled debut and the CSN (1977) follow-up, there is a notable change in the direction and quality of material. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 23, 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released December 19, 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

When they began singing together, CSN could bring shivers to the spines of even the hardest of rock cynics. After the Storm doesn't do that. It doesn't even come close, and while there is some first-rate material here, this is pretty much a botched disc. A cover of the Beatles' "In My Life'' is interesting, but Stills did it much more convincingly on his solo effort. Only "These Empty Days" and the title cut, both from Graham Nash, have any of the old magic in them. The rest sounds like tracks made for solo discs that never saw the light of day and were combined in this form so as to sell product. A rather sad reminder of what once was a vital musical force. © James Chrispell /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 10, 2012 | CSN Records

Booklet
Unlike previous albums bearing CSN somewhere in the title, CSN 2012 is not a studio album: it is a live set capturing the formidable trio on their 2012 tour. It is an unabashed stroll with CSN peppering their standards with the occasional cover -- Bob Dylan's “Girl from the North Country” -- and a few newer tunes. At times, signs of age are evident -- there are certain high harmonies they can no longer hit, Stills is particularly gravelly -- but the crack team of pros help patch up potholes, keeping things smooth and easy. This live set was primarily intended as a home video release, so it’s perhaps best appreciated as a DVD or BluRay, but in any form it’s warm, friendly nostalgia. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 31, 2010 | Rhino Atlantic

This poorly conceived and ultimately redundant compilation suitably came out just in time for the 1980 holiday season. The strong showing of Stephen Stills' titles and the fact that he chose to rewrite history by "updating" (read "altering") two of his own compositions, "Carry On" and "I Give You Give Blind," provide enough evidence to indict him for overseeing such an extraneous anthology. Although a majority of Replay (1980) consists of better-known selections from the Crosby, Stills & Nash canon, tellingly there is as much missing as there is included. Presumably, the idea behind this collection was to augment the So Far (1974) hits package without overlapping material, as well as provide a sampling of side projects. In theory that might seem a noble enough cause; however, there are no David Crosby or Graham Nash cuts. Instead, Stills' "Love the One You're With," "Change Partners," and "First Things First" clutter this otherwise haphazard aggregate, but it is the remixed and re-recorded rendering of "Carry On" that is probably the worst offender. For starters, to facilitate the removal of the "Questions" section from the Déjà Vu (1970) version, the drums and bass have been overdubbed and a new lead guitar solo from (who else?) Stills has been inserted in its stead. All the while, the vocal-and-acoustic-guitar introduction remains intact from the original. When CS&N resumed touring in the early- to mid-'80s, they adopted this altered arrangement for their live performances. The most obvious change to "I Give You Give Blind" has been the removal of the somewhat superfluous string section, resulting in a leaner and edgier feel. The rest of this hails from Crosby, Stills & Nash (1969), Déjà Vu (1970), and CSN (1977). The sole Crosby & Nash inclusion, "Wind on the Water," comes off of the long-player of the same name. . © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Released December 31, 2010 | Rhino Atlantic

This disc was originally to have coincided with the release of the cinematic film War Games -- as the song had been written, recorded, and was even used in early promotional trailers. Likewise, it became both the opening for this album as well as the A-side of a 45 rpm single with the belief that it would be prominently featured in the film. At the 11th hour -- and for mostly political reasons -- the song was removed from the project. So what hit record racks as Allies was a perplexing collection of studio and live tracks -- some dating back over half a decade. Although haphazardly compiled, the lack of cohesion doesn't diminish the value of a majority of the album's performances. In addition to Stephen Stills' up-tempo synth-laden rocker "War Games," Graham Nash co-wrote Allies' other new tune -- the comparatively tame ecologic and politically aware "Raise a Voice." Tellingly, neither tune contained involvement from David Crosby, who was out of commission during most of the '80s. His presence was felt, however, in the concert recordings which were chosen primarily by Nash and derived from two different shows: a 1977 Houston, TX, performance and a more recent 1982 show at the New Universal Amphitheatre in Universal City, CA. From CSN's November 22, 1977, Houston show is one of the highlights of this package -- David Crosby's acoustic cover of Joni Mitchell's "(He Played Real Good) For Free." Crosby's interpretation gives a lonesome renegade quality to the composition that is subdued from Mitchell's own readings. During the final lines, Nash joins Crosby for some unmistakably gorgeous harmony vocals -- proving their inherent value as a duo. The band version of "Shadow Captain" that also hails from the 1977 show is indeed passable, if not a bit reserved, as it varies little from its studio counterpart. The entire Houston performance was simulcast throughout North America and truncated segments of the show have been rebroadcast on the King Biscuit Flower Hour syndicated radio program ever since. The remaining six performances come from a November 19, 1982, show that not only was simulcast live, highlights were compiled for the Daylight Again home video release. Again, the conspicuous absence of David Crosby's normally robust vocals and fretwork indicate the nonentity/liability his on-stage presence had sadly become. Among the highlights in this batch is the cover of Paul McCartney's "Blackbird" -- which easily bests the Beatles' White Album version with some surprisingly agile vocal blends from the trio. A rambunctious electric "For What It's Worth" closes Allies on a definite high note with Stills asserting himself as the preeminent electric guitarist that he was during this era. As the album failed at the cash register and subsequently on the charts, it remained out of print in North America since the mid '80s. In August of 1990, Atlantic Records Japan licensed Allies for compact disc. Few import copies made it to the States before the title became the subject of international legal wrangling at which point it was deleted -- making it highly sought after by fans and collectors alike. While it is certainly not an accurate career retrospective or really even a decent live album, Allies has a few bright moments and is worth at least a listen. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 29, 2009 | Rhino Atlantic

As part of their ongoing reissue of the Crosby, Stills & Nash catalog, Rhino put out Demos, a collection of early home recordings of staples from the CSN catalog, demos recorded both alone and together between the years of 1968 and 1971. Unlike some similar collections, not much here is especially revelatory; apart from "Love the One You're With," here almost droning at the beginning, there are no great differences in lyrics or approach, with such solo recordings as "Almost Cut My Hair" pointing clearly to their latter full-blown incarnations. Apart from "Long Time Gone," recorded by Crosby and Stills before Nash joined the group and bearing a full electric arrangement, everything here is simple and spare, recorded with just acoustic guitars and pianos, often lacking harmonies. All this makes the songs themselves the focal point -- and it makes the handful of tracks with some combination of the group stand out, particularly "Music Is Love" with Crosby, Nash, and Neil Young -- and it's easy to appreciate their construction when they're heard stripped down to their bare bones as they are here. Ultimately, what Demos winds up doing is offering a newfound appreciation for what Crosby, Stills & Nash bring to each other, for as good as these demos are -- and there's not a bad cut here -- none of it sounds as complete as when the three harmonize together. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 22, 1990 | Rhino Atlantic

1990's LIVE IT UP fully embraces the era's slick production ethos--right from the bombastic opening title track, the album is timely take on CSN's timeless sound. Graham Nash performs the big power rock epics, from the singalong "If Anybody Had A Heart" to the tender ballad "House Of Broken Dreams." Stephen Stills indulges his Latin-tinged shuffle muse on "Tomboy" and slows things down for the gritty, acoustic 'Haven't We Lost Enough?" Crosby brings his sweet, melodic gift to bear on some of the album's lighter numbers--from the philosophic "Yours and Mine" to the chiming, synth-driven "Arrows." The album's powerful social statement, "After The Dolphin" unites all three, in a vocal blend which instantly harkens back to the group's early classic works, combining masterful musicianship with a stirring message. © TiVo
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Rock - Released November 18, 1989 | Cult Legends

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Pop - Released September 15, 2009 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released July 3, 2009 | Rhino Atlantic