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Rock - Released June 3, 2014 | Fantasy Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released August 5, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released August 2, 2019 | Craft Recordings

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Creedence were the first to sign up for Woodstock. In April 1969, the Fogerty brothers' band pocketed a cheque for $10,000. Now that they'd landed such a big fish, the organisers knew that other big names would start looking for their own spot on the bill of what was set to be THE festival of the year... But all the same, the group were disappointed to find themselves with a very late billing, between half past midnight and 1:20am, after the Grateful Dead. But that didn't do anything to dampen a perfect performance, presented here in full and remastered. In 1969, Creedence Clearwater Revival was already one of the most popular acts of the day, thanks to their three albums Creedence Clearwater Revival (May 1968), Bayou Country (January 1969) and Green River (August 1969, released two weeks before Woodstock). At the height of the reign of the Beatles and Stones, John Fogerty's Californian gang had something original up their sleeve: savage, raw rock'n'roll, built from rough-hewn, unadorned blues and country. Creedence marked themselves out with their marriage of redneck ways and a hippie style; of tradition and rock'n'roll modernity. Flanked by his big brother Tom, drummer Doug Clifford and bassist Stu Cook, John Fogerty would serve up Dantean hits like Born On The Bayou, Proud Mary and Green River: which are all given a lively, strong treatment here. As ever, Fogerty brays down the mic like a madman (his version of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins's I Put a Spell on You is a show-stopper) while his brother provides pared-down, sharp and affecting guitar lines. With Creedence, you don't get any blowhard solos or incontinent psychedelics. Just a full-frontal blast. Bam! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Released July 8, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released June 3, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released June 24, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released September 11, 2013 | Rare

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Rock - Released March 10, 2015 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1976 | Fantasy Records

There have been literally dozens of Creedence Clearwater Revival collections released since the band called it quits in 1972, and this is the fourth CCR compilation to go out with the title Greatest Hits. So is there anything new, different, or special about this particular item? Well, no. "Born on the Bayou" appears in an monophonic edited version created for its release as a single in 1969, and that's as close as this set gets to a rarity. The cover art is ordinary, the liner notes are minimal, and there are a mere 12 songs here, which adds up to a rather unambitious release. On the other hand, if you really are just looking for Creedence Clearwater Revival's greatest hits, this disc clearly lives up to the billing, and if you're hoping to support the argument that there was no better American rock band between 1969 and 1970 (or at least not one that released so many first-rate singles), Greatest Hits will do nicely. Radio may have played these songs to death over the past few decades, but "Green River," "Up Around the Bend," "Bad Moon Rising," "Travelin' Band," and "Fortunate Son" remain undeniably brilliant songs played with fierce hoodoo soul, and while John Fogerty may have been the peerless songwriter, singer, and idea man, with Tom Fogerty, Stu Cook, and Doug Clifford he had a band that was up to the challenge of bringing these great tunes to life. If you want a single-disc collection of Creedence Clearwater Revival's finest work, your best best is still Chronicle, Vol. 1 (which is about as good as "best-of" albums get), but if you're just looking for a quick fix of great music from this great band, Greatest Hits will deliver exactly what you're looking for, 33 minutes of superb, heartfelt rock & roll. ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released March 31, 2015 | Fantasy Records

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If anything, CCR's third album Green River represents the full flower of their classic sound initially essayed on its predecessor, Bayou Country. One of the differences between the two albums is that Green River is tighter, with none of the five-minute-plus jams that filled out both their debut and Bayou Country, but the true key to its success is a peak in John Fogerty's creativity. Although CCR had at least one cover on each album, they relied on Fogerty to crank out new material every month. He was writing so frequently that the craft became second-nature and he laid his emotions and fears bare, perhaps unintentionally. Perhaps that's why Green River has fear, anger, dread, and weariness creeping on the edges of gleeful music. This was a band that played rock & roll so joyously that they masked the, well, "sinister" undercurrents in Fogerty's songs. "Bad Moon Rising" has the famous line "Hope you've got your things together/Hope you're quite prepared to die," but that was only the most obvious indication of Fogerty's gloom. Consider all the other dark touches: the "Sinister purpose knocking at your door"; the chaos of "Commotion"; the threat of death in "Tombstone Shadow"; you only return to the idyllic "Green River" once you get lost and realize the "world is smolderin'." Even the ballads have a strong melancholy undercurrent, highlighted by "Lodi," where Fogerty imagines himself stuck playing in dead-end towns for the rest of his life. Not the typical thoughts of a newly famous rock & roller, but certainly an indication of Fogerty's inner tumult. For all its darkness, Green River is ultimately welcoming music, since the band rocks hard and bright and the melancholy feels comforting, not alienating. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released November 6, 2015 | Fantasy Records

Throughout 1969 and into 1970, CCR toured incessantly and recorded nearly as much. Appropriately, Cosmo's Factory's first single was the working band's anthem "Travelin' Band," a funny, piledriving rocker with a blaring horn section -- the first indication their sonic palette was broadening. Two more singles appeared prior to the album's release, backed by John Fogerty originals that rivaled the A-side or paled just slightly. When it came time to assemble a full album, Fogerty had only one original left, the claustrophobic, paranoid rocker "Ramble Tamble." Unlike some extended instrumentals, this was dramatic and had a direction -- a distinction made clear by the meandering jam that brings CCR's version of "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" to 11 minutes. Even if it wanders, their take on the Marvin Gaye classic isn't unpleasant, and their faithful, exuberant takes on the Sun classics "Ooby Dooby" and "My Baby Left Me" are joyous tributes. Still, the heart of the album lays in those six fantastic songs released on singles. "Up Around the Bend" is a searing rocker, one of their best, balanced by the menacing murkiness of "Run Through the Jungle." "Who'll Stop the Rain"'s poignant melody and melancholy undertow has a counterpart in Fogerty's dope song, "Lookin' out My Back Door," a charming, bright shuffle, filled with dancing animals and domestic bliss - he had never been as sweet and silly as he is here. On "Long as I Can See the Light," the record's final song, he again finds solace in home, anchored by a soulful, laid-back groove. It hits a comforting, elegiac note, the perfect way to draw Cosmo's Factory -- an album made during stress and chaos, filled with raging rockers, covers, and intense jams -- to a close. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Make no mistake, Willy & the Poor Boys is a fun record, perhaps the breeziest album CCR ever made. Apart from the eerie minor-key closer "Effigy" (one of John Fogerty's most haunting numbers), there is little of the doom that colored Green River. Fogerty's rage remains, blazing to the forefront on "Fortunate Son," a working-class protest song that cuts harder than any of the explicit Vietnam protest songs of the era, which is one of the reasons that it hasn't aged where its peers have. Also, there's that unbridled vocal from Fogerty and the ferocious playing on CCR, which both sound fresh as they did upon release. "Fortunate Son" is one of the greatest, hardest rock & rollers ever cut, so it might seem to be out of step with an album that is pretty laid-back and friendly, but there's that elemental joy that by late '69 was one of CCR's main trademarks. That joy runs throughout the album, from the gleeful single "Down on the Corner" and the lazy jugband blues of "Poorboy Shuffle" through the great slow blues jam "Feelin' Blue" to the great rockabilly spiritual "Don't Look Now," one of Fogerty's overlooked gems. The covers don't feel like throwaways, either, since both "Cotton Fields" and "The Midnight Special" have been overhauled to feel like genuine CCR songs. It all adds up to one of the greatest pure rock & roll records ever cut. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released July 15, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released June 10, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released August 2, 2019 | Craft Recordings

Creedence Clearwater Revival didn't think much of their set at Woodstock. Irritated by being pushed into the midnight slot by a series of misadventures they'd blame on the Grateful Dead, they wrote off their performance, not appearing in either the film or its accompanying soundtrack. Five decades later, they acknowledged the pull of history, consenting to have their performance as part of Rhino's mammoth complete set Woodstock: Back to the Garden, and also allowing it to be released by Craft Recordings. Listening to the nine-song concert in either context, it's bewildering to think that this was dismissed by anybody involved with the band. Throughout their hour-long set, CCR sound ferocious, tearing through their hardest material, playing "Born on the Bayou," "Green River," and "Bootleg" with a nasty edge. The hardness of their choogle is a bit of a revelation, as the band sound fiery in a way that they don't on any of the officially released Creedence live recordings. If CCR stuck to their hits, it'd be one thing, but the band gains momentum as their hour proceeds. Once they play an apocalyptic "I Put a Spell on You," they've set themselves up for a conclusion where they land on two mesmerizing ten-minute concluding songs. "Keep on Chooglin'" and "Suzie Q" stay mean throughout their long jams, leaving the question hanging: if this was Creedence Clearwater Revival on an average night, what on earth did they sound like on a great one? ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1976 | Concord Records, Inc.

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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Universal Music Group International

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Rock - Released July 29, 2014 | Fantasy Records

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Pared down to a trio, Creedence Clearwater Revival had to find a new way of doing business, since already their sound had changed, so they split creative duties evenly. It wasn't just that each member wrote songs -- they produced them, too. Doug Clifford and Stu Cook claim John Fogerty needed time to creatively recharge, while Fogerty says he simply bowed to the duo's relentless pressure for equal time. Both arguments make sense, but either way, the end result was the same: Mardi Gras was a mess. Not a disaster, which it was dismissed as upon its release, since there are a couple of bright moments. Typically, Fogerty is reliable, with the solid rocker "Sweet Hitch-Hiker," the country ramble "Lookin' for a Reason," a good cover of Ricky Nelson's "Hello Mary Lou," and the pretty good ballad "Someday Never Comes." These don't match the brilliance of previous CCR records, but they sparkle next to Clifford and Cook's efforts. That implies that their contributions are terrible, which they're usually not -- they're just pedestrian. Only "Sail Away" is difficult to listen to, due to Cook's flat, overemphasized vocals, but he makes up for it with the solid rocker "Door to Door" and the Fogerty soundalike "Take It Like a Friend." Clifford fares a little better since his voice is warmer and he wisely channels it into amiable country-rock, yet these are pretty average songs by two guys beginning to find their own songwriting voice. If Clifford and Cook had started their own band (which they did after this album) it would be easier to be charitable, but when held up against Creedence's other work, Mardi Gras withers. It's an unpretty end to a great band. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released March 10, 2015 | Fantasy Records