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Electronic/Dance - Released May 3, 2019 | Walk Don't Walk Limited

British electronic band Crazy P have been continually refining their blend of disco, soul, house, and pop since the second half of the '90s, delivering remarkably solid albums and bringing enough live heat to land supporting slots for Chaka Khan and Chic. Age of the Ego, the group's eighth studio album, sounds perfectly in line with their other albums, but this one is unmistakably charged with a greater sense of urgency than anything else they've done. The album's title and cover art, which depicts monkeys taking a selfie, immediately express pointed commentary on the public's social media obsession, and the lyrics go further than that. "The Witness" begins with a text-to-speech sequence about an "Orwellian brave new smart grid," and frontwoman Danielle Moore later declares "The robots are in power" before urging the people to "Fight for the power of love." While this song has a tricky, mid-tempo electro-funk rhythm, the group are up to full disco-house force on tracks like the defiant "We Will F**k You Up," which pledges to combat against the destructive forces of the world. The very Saint Etienne-like "Kari" is a diversion into blissful, heartfelt semi-balladry, but "Barefooted" is a steadfast disco-funk ode to empowerment, graced by inventive, Bernie Worrell-esque synth soloing. "Step Into the Light" and the dreamy "Love Is with You" are more lovestruck, but still poised, confident, and powerful. The eight-minute "This Fire" starts out sounding like an '80s Chaka hit, then gradually builds up with backing vocals that echo Madonna's "Like a Prayer," and somehow manages to fit in a Bowie-sounding vocal part closer to the track's end. All of the songs on Age of the Ego are loaded with determination and revolutionary spirit, and while the group's lyrics have never been more forceful and commanding than they are here, the musicians haven't sacrificed their drive for exploration. The tracks encompass a wide array of tones and influences, and progress into unexpected directions, yet the group exhibit exceptionally tight musicianship, and their work is never less than deeply focused. More importantly, though, the album is joyous, party-friendly, and immensely enjoyable. ~ Paul Simpson
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Electronic/Dance - Released May 11, 2015 | Walk Don't Walk Limited

The disco/house-infused band formerly known as Crazy Penis have had a long recording career, albeit one that hasn't exactly pushed them to experiment or explore their sound too deeply. To focus on the lack of musical boundaries they've crossed is, however, to miss the point. They are a musical act who know what they want, and consistently deliver their vision. Their sound has remained an accessible blend of groovy bass, 4/4 rhythms, and swirling melodies that practically beg for the remix treatment they often receive. So, by their seventh album it should come as no surprise that the music itself is almost indiscernible from their previous album, 2011's When We On. The trick is to compare Walk Dance Talk Sing to their earlier output, and although it follows the same formula, there's an unmistakable difference, at first seemingly unfathomable, but it's the sound of a band who have meticulously refined their approach over two decades; both in their songwriting and studio processes -- they sound honed. All of this goes a long way to explain Crazy P's leading position in the U.K.'s 2010s disco resurgence alongside the likes of Bicep, Horse Meat Disco, and even Floating Points when he's behind the decks. Having based their entire career around danceable hooks has obviously taught them a thing or two, as album-opener "Like a Fool" demonstrates. The song appears to be constructed entirely of hooks, which begin to build until they eventually end up immersing you completely. The tracks that follow utilize more of a straightforward pop structure, complete with verse/chorus/verse; where their previous releases tended to eschew this approach, here Crazy P embraces it, nowhere more exemplified than on "Cruel Mistress." Although one of the few tracks that would feel out of place in a DJ set, it's also one of their finest pop songs to date. The album continues to alternate between hypnotic grooves and vocal-driven songs before hitting something of an anomaly. "The Way" stands out for being one of the only Crazy P tracks to feature little to no percussion, a concept that essentially isn't needed on a Crazy P album. In fairness, it is the shortest song here, and precedes two of the most out-and-out disco tracks, capped by the dizzying eight-minute closer "Witch Doctor," which serves to remind the listener that, at heart, Crazy P can still pull off sprawling disco grooves. Some may create music to challenge the listener or encourage innovation, which is definitely something to commend in an artist, but when an act can stand up and do an impression of themselves that's so good it trumps the original source, then it's hard not to be equally as impressed. If anything, Walk Dance Talk Sing demonstrates that Crazy P has been taking everything on board over the course of their career, and will continue to build upon the "dance music with a soul" underground empire they rightly own. ~ Liam Martin

Dance - Released January 14, 2013 | 2020Vision

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Dance - Released July 14, 2017 | Classic Music Company

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 18, 2015 | Walk Don't Walk Limited

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Dance - Released June 18, 2012 | Concert Live Ltd

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SOS

Electronic/Dance - Released January 30, 2019 | Walk Don't Walk Limited

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 26, 2018 | Walk Don't Walk Limited

Dance - Released January 27, 2013 | 2020Vision

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Electronic/Dance - Released April 5, 2019 | Walk Don't Walk Limited

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House - Released May 31, 2009 | 2020Vision

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 6, 2012 | Om

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 27, 2011 | Om

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 30, 2015 | Walk Don't Walk Limited

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 27, 2011 | Om

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Electronic/Dance - Released September 6, 2011 | Om